Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Dallas Art Fair 2016 and Houston Roundup

By Dorothée Dupuis Dallas, Texas 04/15/2016 – 04/17/2016
nickandjake

Nick Vaughan and Jake Margolin at Devin Borden, Houston.

What’s the difference between prejudice and fantasy? Texas incarnates a big chunk of the American dream, notably in relation to a specific landscape, the one of the Wild West, with its reddish canyons and strategically designed myths of autochthon tribes fighting heroic cowboys whitewashed as straight and Caucasian. On this image is superimposed others of oil derrick pumping endlessly in arid plains and deep-sea waters, as well as skyscrapers drawn from what seems a Yankee version of Dubai. But the reality of the third largest art market of the USA is of course something else: a wide range of climates gives to its eastern part a pleasantly temperate, although a bit humid, landscape with big trees, rivers, and national parks. If the state is very conservative on many points, notably in regard to social issues like women’s rights and immigration policies, it also hosts an excellent network of public schools and leading universities, hosting science and humanities departments that conduct cutting edge research programs entrusted with ideological pressure from generous sponsoring from patrons eager to push forward the thriving economy of their state.

RR_AD_march2016_008

American Dirt. Found photographs by Jeff Ferrell. Organized by Gavin Morrison and Fraser Stables/Atopia Projects at the Reading Room, Dallas.

For few years now the push to feature more content about Texas has prevailed in Mexico City, driven by a sense of necessity, timing, and crucial personal intuition. For if the two neighbors share the history of a fluctuating border that has repeatedly excited tensions during the last centuries, especially for the daily life and politics of inhabitants of border towns such as Laredo, Brownsville or El Paso, the cultural aspect of the relationship remains a myth. If the north of Mexico definitely acknowledges being influenced by US culture, the contrary isn’t always true for Texas, where many people of Mexican origins disregard this aspect of their genealogy. At the same time, a lot of younger American people of Mexican descent come to Mexico City in search of their roots, notably linguistic. Visiting Texas definitely leads to a finer understanding of both cultures, breaking away from clichés to access finer approaches of identity and territory-related notions applied to art, theory and cultural production.

LABOR_Dallas

Pedro Reyes and Terence Gower at Labor, Mexico City. Dallas Art Fair 2016.

Texas, in the lineage of its universities, which themselves host interesting contemporary art programs (like the Blaffer in Houston or the Blanton in Austin) host a great deal of strong institutions. The Menil Collection in Houston is an almost century-old collection rooted in a deep understanding of modern vanguards as seen from the upper class US provincial codes. In a humanistic attempt, the Menil gathered in their collection as much occidental art from their immediate artistic entourage as masterpieces from ancient, non-occidental cultures. The Menil also bought the houses in the immediate vicinity of the collection in order to offer affordable housing to the artistic community of the city, lastingly positioning Houston as the hospitable place for artists, a position recently challenged by thriving hip neighbor Austin. Around that legacy first gravitates the Museum of Fine Arts, whose program has been pioneering, for instance, in Latin American art (Gabriela Rangel now director of the Americas Society in NY used to work there). The collection-less Contemporary Art Museum is an agile institution whose curator Dean Daderko is not afraid of feminists, people of color, and queer heroines such as recently Joan Jonas, Gina Pane, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Wu Tsang or MPA: a bold program interestingly supported by the local board. Local galleries embrace the mission of unveiling local talents, such as lately Anthony Sonnenberg at Art Palace, Rodrigo Valenzuela at David Shelton, and Nick Vaughan and Jake Margolin at Devin Borden, with a remarkable project about LGBT life during the American Frontier era entitled 50 States. Sicardi Gallery establishes since the 90s a quite successful intra-Americas dialogue among local collectors and institutions. Visited to know more about late Pop Mexican-American artist Luis Jimenez, Gallerist Betty Moody –who opened her space in the 60s– confessed to me that, “Texas artists had never formed any formal movements because they were too individualist”.

holmqvist

Karl Holmqvist at the Power Station, Dallas. April 2016.

To name a few interesting works I saw during the Dallas Art Fair opening include: Yamini Nayar at Wendi Norris, San Francisco; TR Ericsson at Harlan Levey Projects, Brussels; Lauren Woods at Conduit Gallery, Dallas; Gelitin at Massimo de Carlo, Milano; Trevor Shimizu at Misako & Rosen; Ida Ekblad at Karma International, Zürich/Los Angeles; Naama Tsabar at Páramo, Guadalajara; John Dilg at Jeff Bailey Gallery, Hudson, NY; Terence Gower at Labor, Mexico City, among others.

laurenwood

Lauren Woods, video still from Tempest Tossed Variations 1 & 2 // Courtesy of Zhulong Gallery.

 

In town, Rebecca Warren at the Dallas Museum of Art and Mai Thu Perret at the Nasher Sculpture Center offered meditative visits over both distinct, femininely engaged sculptural practices. In the Fair Park neighborhood, Karl Homlqvist presented a successful installation at the Power Station, a great not-for-profit, privately run initiative that I have admired from the Internet for quite a while. Nearby is located CentralTrak, a residency program of University of Texas hosting artists studios and an exhibition space –where a quite intriguing painting show by Angelika J.Trojnarski is up currently. The tiny Reading Room led by facetious Karen Weiner, is also worth the visit. It’s a space interested in the links between contemporary art, literature and concrete poetry, and where transparent vinyls by Kenneth Goldsmith adorn the shelves and Scottish curators do shows about found material garbage –the show reminded me of my first artworks as much as it celebrated the past richness of a life unspent on Instagram. The Warehouse, presenting the museum-quality collections of Howard Rachofsky and Vernon Faulconer to the public, was featuring works such as an impressive Cell by Louise Bourgeois or an uncanny puppet by Maurizio Cattelan, chanting the pace of the rushed public that is the one in-town-for-the-fair kind of one. There, my friend Stefan was participating in a sensationalist panel featuring Hauser and Wirth’s partner Paul Schimmel and Sotheby’s head Amy Cappellazzo, moderated by Sarah Thornton, author of the masterpiece 7 days in the art world. The political incorrectness of this conversation, where all notions of good and evil were twisted to make the market appear as the Invisible Heroic Force behind all celebration of (waspy, straight, and male) artistic genius was simply embarrassing for everyone. In Texas, land of contrast, the emperor’s clothes seem to be more transparent than ever.

nickandjake

Nick Vaughan y Jake Margolin en Devin Borden, Houston. Dallas Art Fair 2016.

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre el prejuicio y la fantasía? Texas encarna gran parte del sueño americano, notablemente en relación a un paisaje específico, el del Wild West, con sus valles rojos y sus mitos diseñados de tribus autóctonas peleando cowboys heroicos blanqueados. Sobre esta imagen se sobreponen torres de perforación para extraer petróleo, bombeando infinitamente en desiertos calurosos y mares profundos, al igual que rascacielos traídos de lo que parece un Dubai el estilo yanqui. Aun así, la realidad del tercer mercado del arte más grande de todo Estados Unidos, por supuesto es otra cosa: una amplia gama de climas dota de su lado este de una temperatura agradable, aunque un poco húmeda, un paisaje de árboles grandes, ríos y parques nacionales. Si el estado es conservador en muchos sentidos, especialmente en relación a cuestiones sociales como los derechos de mujer y las políticas de inmigración, también auspicia una excelente red de escuelas públicas y universidades con departamentos de humanidades y ciencias conduciendo incisivos programas de investigación encomendadas con la presión ideológica de los generosos patrocinios de los patronos ansiosos por impulsar la próspera economía de su estado.

RR_AD_march2016_008

American Dirt. Found photographs por Jeff Ferrell. Organized by Gavin Morrison and Fraser Stables/Atopia Projects en el Reading Room, Dallas.

Desde algunos años existe la inquietud de promover más contenido artístico sobre Texas en la Ciudad de México, impulsado por la necesidad, el tiempo y la intuición personal. Si los dos vecinos comparten una historia fronteriza fluctuante que ha excitado tensiones repetidamente durante los siglos pasados, especialmente en la vida diaria y la política de los habitantes de ciudades fronterizas como Laredo, Brownsville o El Paso, el aspecto cultural de la relación sigue siendo un mito. Si el norte de México definitivamente reconoce la influencia de la cultura americana, al contrario no es siempre cierto, donde mucha gente de origen mexicano ignora este aspecto de su genealogía. Al mismo tiempo, muchos jóvenes americanos de descendencia mexicana viaja a la Ciudad de México en busca de sus raíces, particularmente lingüísticas. Visitar Texas definitivamente lleva a un mejor entendimiento de ambas culturas, rompiendo con los clichés para dar acceso a acercamientos más finos de identidad y nociones relacionadas con el territorio, aplicadas al arte, la teoría y la producción cultural.

LABOR_Dallas

Pedro Reyes y Terence Gower en Labor, Ciudad de México. Dallas Art Fair 2016.

Texas, en el linaje de sus universidades, que auspician sus propios programas de arte contemporáneo (como el Blaffer en Houston o el Blanton en Austin) también cuenta con un buen número de instituciones fuertes. The Menil Collection en Houston es una colección de casi un siglo, arraigada en un entendimiento profundo de las vanguardias modernas vistas desde los códigos provincianos de la clase alta estadounidense. En un esfuerzo humanístico, la Menil reunió en su colección tanto arte occidental de su entorno artístico inmediato como obras maestras de culturas antiguas no-occidentales. La colección Menil compró las casas aledañas a su sede para poder ofrecer alojamiento accesible a la comunidad artística de la ciudad, finalmente posicionando a Houston como un lugar de auspicio de las artes, una posición que recientemente fue retada por su próspero vecino Austin. Alrededor de ese legado gravita el Museum of Fine Arts, cuyo programa ha sido pionero, por ejemplo, en arte latinoamericano (Gabriela Rangel, ahora directora de la Americas Society en Nueva York, solía trabajar ahí). El Contemporary Art Museum, que no tiene colección, es una institución ágil, cuyo curador Dean Daderko no le teme a feministas, gente de color o heroínas queer como Joan Jonas, quien recientemente expuso en el museo, Gina Pane, LaToya Ruby Frazer, Wu Tsang o MPA; un audaz programa, interesantemente apoyado por el patronato local. Las galerías locales adoptan la misión de descubrir talentos locales, como los recientemente presentados: Anthony Sonnenberg en Art Palace, Rodrigo Valenzuela en David Shelton, Nick Vaughan y Jake Margolin en Devin Borden, con un notable proyecto sobre la vida LGBT durante la era de la American Frontier, titulada 50 States. La Galería Sicardi ha establecido, desde los 90s, un diálogo inter-estadounidense bastante exitoso entre coleccionistas e instituciones locales. Visité  a la galerista Betty Moody, quien abrió su espacio en los sesentas, para saber más sobre Luis Jimenez, un artista pop mexicano-americano fallecido en los novntas, y ella me confesó que “los artistas tejanos nunca han formado un movimiento porque siempre fueron muy individualistas”.

holmqvist

Karl Holmqvist en el Power Station, Dallas. Abril 2016.

Para nombrar algunas obras interesantes que vi durante la inauguración de Dallas Art Fair, incluiría a: Yamini Nayar en Wendi Norris, San Francisco; TR Ericsson en Harlan Levey Projects, Bruselas; Lauren Woods en Conduit Gallery, Dallas; Gelitin en Massimo de Carlo, Milán; Trevor Shimizu en Misako & Rosen; Ida Ekblad en Karma International, Zürich/Los Angeles; Naama Tsabar en Páramo, Guadalajara; John Dilg en Jeff Bailey Gallery, Hudson, NY; Terence Gower en Labor, Ciudad de México, entre otros.

laurenwood

Lauren Woods, video still from Tempest Tossed Variations 1 & 2 // Courtesy of Zhulong Gallery.

En la ciudad, Rebecca Warren en el Dallas Museum of Art y Mai Thu Perret en el Nasher Sculpture Center ofrecían visitas meditativas alrededor de prácticas escultóricas comprometidas con la feminidad. En el barrio de Fair Park, Karl Holmqvist presentó una exitosa instalación en The Power Station, una increíble institución sin fines de lucro, una iniciativa privada que he admirado a través de Internet por un tiempo. Cerca de ahí está CentralTrak, un programa de residencias de la Universidad de Texas que auspicia talleres de artistas y un espacio de exposición donde actualmente se muestra una intrigante pintura de Angelika J. Trojnarski. El pequeño Reading Room, dirigido por la ingeniosa Karen Weiner, también vale la pena visitar. Es un espacio interesante por la relación entre arte contemporáneo, literatura y poesía concreta, y en donde un vinil transparente de Kenneth Goldsmith adorna las repisas y unos curadores escocéses hacen exposiciones sobre material de desecho encontrado –esta exposición me recordó a mis primeras obras tanto y celebraban la pasada riqueza de una vida sin Instagram. The Warehouse, mostrando las colecciones (de calidad de museo) de Howard Rachofsky y Vernon Faulconer al público, presentaba obras como la impresionante Cell de Louise Bourgeois o la siniestra marioneta de Maurizio Cattelan, coreando el paso de ese público acelerado que acude a la ciudad solamente para la feria. Ahí, mi amigo Stefan participaba en un panel sensacionalista con uno de los socios de Hauser and Wirth, Paul Schimmel, y la directora de Sotheby’s, Amy Cappellazzo, moderado por Sarah Thornton, autora del bestseller Seven Days in the Art World. La incorrección política de esta conversación, en la que todas las nociones de bueno y malo eran moldeadas para hacer parecer al mercado como una fuerza heroica invisible detrás de toda celebración del (blanco, heterosexual y masculino) genio artístico, fue simplemente vergonzoso para todos. En Texas, tierra de contrastes, la vestimenta del emperador parece ser más transparente que nunca.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

SITU #6

Not Much Futher

Las quince letras

Quieren Dinero