Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

ARCO Madrid 2016

By Rosa Lleó Madrid, Spain 02/24/2016 – 02/28/2016

As a reader, articles on art fairs are the texts I take up when I have my coffee —or in quick, uncomplicated moments of procrastination. They receive the same short-span attention we tired spectators offer up in person at the events they describe. The most feasible option for writers —aware that a detailed analysis of this forum for networking, parties and hangovers is impossible— is to clearly disclose they will present a deeply skewed and subjective view of what, because of scheduling and degrees of exhaustion, they manage to remember over the course of its four days.

LARA

Lara Favaretto, Homage to Jas Ban Ader, 2015, brass, soil, iron sealed box, 270 × 140 × 180 cm.

I’ll say that in my case, this edition of ARCO made it pretty easy. The fair has featured defined sections for years now, as well as a roster of major galleries. Two specific events to celebrate the event’s thirty-fifth anniversary constituted a novelty: there was a solo-show tour of Madrid as well as a new section with galleries that participated in past editions, showcasing projects by two artists from different generations. This last section, curated by María and Lorena del Corral, Catalina Lozano and Aaron Moulton, presented projects from 32 galleries and included some brilliant statements that revealed an underlying curatorial strategy. At Annet Gelink, for example, Ed van der Elsken portraits were alternated with a series of superimposed commercial photography images by David Malkjovic. Their presentation juxtaposed two photographic tendencies, one more urban and documentary, by an established hand, beside archive-produced imagery. Also related to notions of photography, Franco Noero presented a series by Simon Starling on the photographic apparatus used to portray museum shows, revealing the complex system of proofs, negatives and large-format cameras behind key works from the history of art. These “representations of representation” found a counterpoint in Lara Favaretto’s grand gilded sculpture in which reflection constructed a third representation of us, the spectators, as we take in the artwork. Marian Goodman made a show of its power with a fantastic John Baldessari installation, featuring wallpaper that repeated his celebrated quote, I will not make any more boring art, covering a dark room that was in turn a forum for a Tino Sehgal performance. Here two artists one would not imagine together, at least a priori, work as a complete exhibition experience. From the outside fair’s horror vacui, you migrate to a moment of darkness and full intimacy, where you once more experience the fear audiences felt before a similar Sehgal piece at the last edition of dOCUMENTA. I was also pleased to be able to take in Brazilian artist Erika Verzutti’s work directly at Fortes Vilaça: a set of stone sculptures somewhat resembling melons unloaded from a fruit truck, forms that suggest the artist’s highly particular universe of formal associations. It was a pleasure to make my way among projects where an interest in display can be intuited, for which visitors who want to go beyond the idea of the fair as a street market should be thankful.

pepo salazar

Pepo Salazar, Galerie Joseph Tang at ARCOmadrid 2016. Courtesy of Galerie Joseph Tang.

Generally speaking, all the galleries this year took care not to bring in too many artworks and tried to create small shows featuring two or three artists, above all those that, after participating in the introductory sections, made the leap to the general section, where booths might occupy even more square meters than their namesake galleries. Amid the other curated sections, Opening, by Juan Canela and Chris Sharp, included interesting surprises like Pepo Salazar’s installation at Joseph Tang. Both the artist and the dealer traveled from Paris in a rented van that ended up as a major piece in their booth, alongside other objects like a steam iron on top of a stack of Nike shoeboxes or cheap, generic office chairs. The gaze travels to an observation of the most banal and corporate design, and to commercial brands’ more stylized aesthetic, that can take as much or more care than contemporary art when it comes to display. It was also a surprise to discover performance and sculpture by Osías Yanov, Fernanda Laguna’s metaphysical drawings and paintings, and Lux Lindner’s unsettling drawings, all at Galería Nora Fisch. These three Buenos Aires artists also happen to be as many emblematic personalities on the Argentine scene, not just as visual artists but as poets and theorists. The artworks served as an introduction to the country that will be next year’s guest nation at the fair.

nora fisch

Osías Yanov, Un año de petróleo gratis, 2015, iron sculpture meant to be “activated” by a performance, bodysuit, video, 150 × 20 cm.

This year the section called Solo Projects: Focus Latinoamérica gathered pieces by artists that Irene Hoffmann, Lucía Sanromán, Ruth Estévez and Maria de Pontes selected. In most cases their quality was exceptional. I was able to talk to Chilean artist Patricia Domínguez, whose installation Los ojos serán lo último en pixelarse fascinated me for the complexity of its references —everything from anthropology to animist practices by means of a highly contemporary formalization— where digital images and devices portray classic painterly tropes such as the horse, that in turn serves as an element representing military power and connects to New World colonization. Also worthy of note was a rather marked line formed by numerous projects that recuperate 70s- and 80s-era Latin American conceptual and performance artists such as Carlos Ginzburg (at Henrique Faria) or Alberto Greco (at Buenos Aires’s Galería del Infinito). Outside that specific section but quite worthy of mention along these lines were Galeria Jaqueline Martins and artworks by Hudinilson Jr, from the framework of marginalized social sectors such as homosexuals in 1980s Brazil.

16-arco8

Patricia Domínguez, Los ojos serán lo último en pixelarse, HD video, audio, 09:00 min, loop, 2016. Courtesy of Patricia Ready.

The city of Madrid itself became part of ARCO over the course of the fair. Año 35 Madrid, curated by Javier Hontoria, gathered nine projects by contemporary artists that were inserted into different historic museums throughout the city. It allowed for entry into the Spanish capital’s more traditional and “pure” universe, a complete colonial deployment per se that set off a curious relationship to the fair’s longstanding goal of being a bridge to Latin America. The most interesting aspect of this gesture is recognizing these historic frictions at venues like the Museo Antropológico Nacional or the Museo Naval, whose subtle interventions more invited observation of the museums’ objects and classification than the new artworks themselves. In contrast to such historically over-freighted and -weighted environments, we stumbled on Adriano Amaral’s intervention in the Estudios de Tabacalera’s empty, abandoned space. The projection of a swimming crocodile, lit in fluorescent tones, gave rise to an apprehension of the space based on the fluid and malleable nature of the materials, light and sound, and created a magnificent moment of minimal, somewhat enigmatic gestures.

Arco_Año_35 Tabacalera 094

Adriano Amaral, Tabacalera Estudios, Año 35 Madrid.

In general, this year’s edition was serious and professional, featuring no scandals onto which the mainstream press could glom; they left us alone, carping it was boring this time around. They could not attend the five hundred parties thrown by the time of the fair’s closing, always a big part of ARCO, too, that fosters a social and professional “moment.” Maybe in the past everything revolved around that; but now you can also talk about the quality of what you saw during the day, and not just based on what’s coming out of Museo Reina Sofía.

Como lectora, los artículos sobre ferias son textos que leo mientras tomo el café o en momentos de procrastinación, rápidos y sencillos. Se les dedica el mismo tipo de corta atención que la que tenemos como espectadores cansados en estos eventos. Para el que escribe, consciente de que el análisis detallado en ese lugar de encuentros, fiestas y resacas es imposible, la opción más factible es la de exponer claramente que dará una visión profundamente sesgada y subjetiva de lo que, por horarios y grado de fatiga, consiguió retener en su memoria durante esos cuatro días.

LARA

Lara Favaretto, Homage to Jas Ban Ader, 2015, brass, soil, iron sealed box, 270 × 140 × 180 cm.

Cabe decir que, en mi caso, esta edición de ARCO me lo ha puesto relativamente fácil: una feria con secciones definidas desde hace unos años y una lista de galerías consolidadas. Como novedad, dos eventos específicos por la celebración de su 35 aniversario: un recorrido de exposiciones individuales por Madrid, y una nueva sección con galerías que participaron en ediciones pasadas con proyectos de dos artistas, de diferentes generaciones. Esta última sección, comisariada por María y Lorena del Corral, Catalina Lozano y Aaron Moulton, presentó proyectos de 32 galerías con algunos statements brillantes, donde se podía ver una estrategia curatorial. Como ejemplo, en Annet Gelink, se intercalaron los retratos de Ed van der Elsken con una serie de piezas de imágenes de superposiciones de fotografías comerciales de David Malkjovic. Dos tendencias de la fotografía, la más urbana y documental de la mano de un clásico, junto a la imagen producida de archivo. En relación con el concepto de la fotografía también, Franco Noero presentó una serie de Simon Starling sobre el apparatus fotográfico utilizado para retratar exposiciones en museos, develando el entramado de pruebas, negativos y cámaras de gran formato detrás de obras clave de la historia del arte. Estas “representaciones de la representación” tenían su contrapunto con una gran escultura dorada de Lara Favaretto en la que el reflejo construía una tercera representación de nosotros mismos mirando esas obras. Marian Goodman demostró su poderío con una fantástica instalación de John Baldessari de papel de pared con la repetición de su célebre frase I will not make any more boring art que cubría una habitación oscura donde se encontraba un performance de Tino Sehgal. Dos artistas que a priori uno no imagina juntos, pero que en este caso funcionan como experiencia expositiva. Del horror vacui del exterior de la feria se pasa a un momento de oscuridad e intimidad total donde uno vuelve a sentir esa sensación de miedo que tuvo en la última dOCUMENTA delante de una pieza similar de Sehgal. También me hizo feliz poder ver en directo el trabajo de la brasileña Erika Verzutti en Fortes Vilaça. Un conjunto de esculturas de piedra con forma de algo parecido a melones descargados de un camión de frutas, formas que sugieren el universo de asociaciones formales tan particular de la artista. Un placer poder pasearse por proyectos donde se puede intuir un interés por el display, que son de agradecer para el visitante que quiere ir más allá de la idea de feria como mercadillo.

pepo salazar

Pepo Salazar, Galerie Joseph Tang en ARCOmadrid 2016. Cortesía de Galerie Joseph Tang.

En general todas las galerías hicieron esmero este año en no llevar demasiados trabajos e intentar crear una pequeña exposición con dos o tres artistas, sobre todo aquellos que después de haber participado en las secciones introductorias daban el salto a la sección general, donde podía ocurrir que su stand tuviese más metros cuadrados que su propia galería. Dentro de las demás secciones comisariadas, Opening, curada por Juan Canela y Chris Sharp, incluía sorpresas interesantes como la instalación de Pepo Salazar en Joseph Tang. Artista y galerista viajaron desde París en una furgoneta de alquiler que acabó como pieza principal del stand además de otros objetos como una plancha doméstica encima de una pila de cajas de zapatillas Nike o las típicas sillas baratas de oficina. La mirada se dirige hacia la observación del diseño de lo más banal y corporativo, la estética más estilizada de las marcas comerciales que pueden llegar a cuidar su display tanto o más que el arte contemporáneo. También fue una sorpresa poder descubrir a través de la galería Nora Fisch tres artistas de Buenos Aires que son a su vez tres personajes emblemáticos de la escena argentina, no sólo como artistas visuales sino como poetas y teóricos: el performance y la escultura de Osías Yanov, el dibujo y las pinturas metafísicas de Fernanda Laguna y los inquietantes dibujos de Lux Lindner. Una introducción al que será el próximo año país invitado a la feria.

nora fisch

Osías Yanov, Un año de petróleo gratis, 2015, iron sculpture meant to be “activated” by a performance, bodysuit, video, 150 × 20 cm.

La sección Solo Projects: Focus Latinoamérica este año traía proyectos de artistas seleccionados por Irene Hoffmann, Lucía Sanromán, Ruth Estévez y Maria de Pontes. Destacaba la calidad de la mayoría. Estuve conversando con la artista chilena Patricia Domínguez cuya instalación Los ojos serán lo último en pixelarse me dejó fascinada por la complejidad de sus referencias, desde la antropología a las prácticas animistas a través de una formalización muy contemporánea, donde las imágenes y aparatos digitales representan conceptos de la pintura clásica como el caballo, que a su vez le sirve como elemento que representa el poder militar y que conecta con la colonización de América. También cabe destacar una línea bastante visible con numerosos proyectos que recuperan artistas conceptuales y de performance de los años setenta y ochenta latinoamericanos como Carlos Ginzburg en Henrique Faria o Alberto Greco en Galería del Infinito en Buenos Aires. Fuera de la sección específica pero de importante mención en esta línea también estaría la galería Jaqueline Martins con los trabajos de Hudinilson Jr, que corresponde al marco de un campo social marginal como el de la homosexualidad en los años 80 en Brasil.

16-arco8

Patricia Domínguez, Los ojos serán lo último en pixelarse, video HD, audio, 09:00 min, loop, 2016. Cortesía de Patricia Ready.

La ciudad de Madrid también se convirtió en parte de ARCO estos días. Año 35 Madrid, comisariado por Javier Hontoria, reunió nueve proyectos de artistas contemporáneos insertados en diferentes museos históricos de la ciudad, hecho que permitía adentrarse en el universo más tradicional y castizo de la capital española, todo un despliegue colonial en sí mismo que causa una curiosa relación con la vocación que ha tenido la feria de ser el puente con Latinoamérica. Lo más interesante de este gesto es reconocer esas fricciones históricas en lugares como el Museo Antropológico nacional o el Museo Naval, cuyas sutiles intervenciones invitaban más a observar los objetos del museo y su clasificación que los nuevos trabajos. En contraposición a estos ambientes tan recargados y pesados históricamente, encontrábamos la intervención de Adriano Amaral en el espacio vacío y abandonado de los Estudios de Tabacalera. La proyección de un cocodrilo nadando iluminado, de tono fluorescente, generaba una aprehensión del espacio a partir de lo líquido y lo maleable de los materiales, la luz y el sonido generando un momento magnífico de gestos mínimos y un tanto enigmáticos.

Arco_Año_35 Tabacalera 094

Adriano Amaral, Tabacalera Estudios, Año 35 Madrid.

En general, una edición seria y profesional, donde la prensa generalista ya no tuvo ningún escándalo donde apoyarse y nos dejó en paz para comentar que fue una edición aburrida. No pudieron atender las quinientas fiestas que tenían lugar al cerrar la feria, porque de eso siempre se ha tratado ARCO también, de generar un momento social y profesional. Antes quizá todo giraba alrededor de eso, ahora también uno puede hablar de la calidad de lo visto durante el día, y no sólo desde lo producido por el Museo Reina Sofía.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Doble fondo

Ways of doing: actions from TEOR/éTica

359 días en 19 meses

Night Tide Part II