Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

The Year I Stopped Making Art. Why the Art World Should Assist Artists Beyond Representation: in Solidarity

Paul Maheke

Traveling through time, in this prose originally published on Documentations.art, the artist Paul Maheke presents resistance embodied in vulnerability memories to question the systematic precariousness involved in participating in the art system, which is exacerbated day by day in the context of the pandemic.

Viajando en el tiempo, en esta prosa publicada originalmente en Documentations.art, el artista Paul Maheke presenta resistencias encarnadas en memorias de vulnerabilidad para cuestionar la precariedad sistemática que implica participar en el sistema del arte, la cual se agudiza día a día en el contexto de la pandemia.

The mushroom book. A popular guide to the identification and study of our commoner Fungi, with special emphasis on the edible varieties by Nina L. Marshall (New York, ed. Doubleday, 1902). Image: The Biodiversity Heritage Library

The year I stopped making art was the year I became a single parent. It was 1622, I got enslaved and was taken by force to North America to work in a field. It was 2003 and I had to travel to another country to get an abortion. The year I stopped making art was 1997. When I had to save thousands for my tritherapy and to provide for my mother who had just lost her job. It was 2017 when I fell short of money to pay the registration fee of the photo contest, of the art residency, of the entrance exam at the prestigious Uni.

The year I stopped making art, I just stopped. I wasn’t just being slowed down in my progress, I didn’t take a detour, it just stopped. Life didn’t throw me curveballs, at least not more than usual… My whole life felt like a curveball.

I had no more stamina. Not a single drop of blood left. My body collapsed. That’s the year when I couldn’t hold it together any longer. You failed me.

One day, it felt like the ground went missing and there was nothing below to prevent the fall from happening. This was the year I came out as trans*. This was the year I had to pay for my gender-affirming surgery. This was the year I got scapegoated and shit-talked.

The year I stopped making art, it was before COVID-19. It didn’t take a global pandemic to end my career. I just didn’t manage to pay my tax return on time. It was 2019 and I had a bike accident on one of my shifts when I delivered food to people’s door. The year I stopped making art, it didn’t take for the wealthiest parts of the world to go in total lockdown, to be made redundant from the arts industry.

It was so mundane no one noticed.

No one noticed because I couldn’t make an artwork out of it. It couldn’t be turned into art. It just ended. My shows were canceled and no one paid me and no one saw me.

I had made art for too long by now to be hired by any company outside the field. No restaurant would give a job to someone with little to no experience in hospitality.

The mushroom book. A popular guide to the identification and study of our commoner Fungi, with special emphasis on the edible varieties by Nina L. Marshall (New York, ed. Doubleday, 1902). Image: The Biodiversity Heritage Library

The year I stopped making art is the year my secondary school teacher decided I would make a good factory technician. This was the year my parents had to move further away, away from the center; barely on the outskirts in suburbia. The year I stopped making art is when I realized I needed to speak several languages in order to be an artist, to have a computer with unlimited access to the internet and a smartphone to answer your emails on the go. The year I had to stop, is the year I couldn’t afford to commute to your museum to meet you. I was wrestling with depression and mental illness.

It was 1957 and my husband had to endorse every single spending made. It was 1578, I was thrown into a river, my hands tied to my feet. This was the year they thought I was a witch. It was 2008 when I became homeless because my benefits were cut and you didn’t pay me. It all stopped when I realized I was the only person of color at your opening. It stopped when I had to clean floors of hotel rooms, airports, and trains to make ends meet. That’s also when I saw you walk in the business lounge. I smelled your fragrance when you passed by. Turns out, they sell a fake version of your perfume at the local market down the estate. I almost smelled like you the year I stopped making art. Me smelling like you was my camouflage. It didn’t make a difference when in 2020, I was forced to stop because of the fragile state of my finances.

The next day, you and I still smelled the same fig leaf scented fragrance you spray in your hair and your neck every morning. You were at your office, in the museum, on the day our president decided to bar access to various institutions across the country to prevent a virus to spread. You carefully applied the alcohol-based gel on your hands and your wrists, which would prevent you from getting contaminated. Then, you went on to check your bank account on your phone. You thought “it should be fine until it all ends”. You just had collected the money from the rent of your tenant, your paid sick leave, the bitcoins someone mined for you overnight. The year I stopped making art you started trading them.

In 2016 you made sure I wouldn’t talk to anybody about what happened in the studio, at your office, in your flat, in the toilets at the fair. It’s the year you repeatedly twisted my words. You made sure your verbal abuse would be deemed as innuendoes to anyone hearing your side of the story. The side where your true power lies. This was the year I felt too ashamed to talk about it: the year I stopped making art was the year I was made to feel small. The year I was reminded that my visibility would never measure up to your financial stability.

The mushroom book. A popular guide to the identification and study of our commoner Fungi, with special emphasis on the edible varieties by Nina L. Marshall (New York, ed. Doubleday, 1902). Image: The Biodiversity Heritage Library

So when in the last months of 2020, I was home, still bed-bound and the museum didn’t pay me, I knew this was the year I would have to stop art. How was I to pay for my living expenses otherwise? This was going to last for a while, they said. “I am sorry to hear you’re experiencing difficulties. It’s a tough time for us all”, you said. I wondered who you meant when you were saying “us” because I didn’t feel like a part of your “we.”

The year I stopped making art, is when I realized how you couldn’t care less because you didn’t have to. How you were not part of this, because you never had to. That’s the year I gathered that when you were saying “us” you were meaning “them”, and that was the reason why you were still able to talk and tweet when no one else could. You embody the savviest form of ignorance.

The year I stopped making art is the year I was reminded I did not have a safety net or support structure to carry me through the testing of time like you did. That I was too naive to think I could make it all the way through, just like you.

“Jog on!”. You made a swerve and I couldn’t follow. Leaving me to chew on the sillage of your perfume/our perfume.

The year I stopped making art is the year I almost smelled like you, but only to realize that, to you, I was always gonna be the smell of forgery.

March, 2020

—-

Paul Maheke (b. 1985, France) lives and works in London. With a focus on dance and through a varied and often collaborative body of work comprising performance, installation, sound, and video, Maheke considers the potential of the body as an archive in order to examine how memory and identity are formed and constituted.

—-

This article was first published by DOCUMENTATIONS in March 2020. DOCUMENTATIONS is a participatory media fighting against the conservative and hegemonic discourse that governs art today.

The mushroom book. A popular guide to the identification and study of our commoner Fungi, with special emphasis on the edible varieties por Nina L. Marshall (Nueva York, ed. Doubleday, 1902). Imagen vía The Biodiversity Heritage Library

El año que paré de hacer arte. Por qué el mundo del arte debe ir más allá de la representación y optar por la solidaridad

El año en que paré de hacer arte fue el año en que me convertí en xadre solterx. Fue en 1622, cuando fui esclavizadx y llevadx a Norteamérica en contra de mi voluntad. Era el 2003, y tuve que viajar a otro país para hacerme un aborto. El año en el cual paré de hacer arte fue en 1997, cuando tuve que ahorrar miles para mi triterapia y proveer para mi madre, quien había perdido su trabajo. Fue en el 2017, que me sentí cortx de dinero y no pude pagar la inscripción para el concurso de fotografía, ni de la residencia de arte, ni del examen para entrar a la uni de prestigio.

El año en el cual paré de hacer arte, simplemente paré. No había ralentizado mi proceso solamente; no me desvié, sólo paré. La vida no me envió obstáculos, al menos no más de los usuales… Toda mi vida se sentía como un gran obstáculo.

No tenía más aguante. No quedaba ni una sola gota de sangre. Mi cuerpo colapsó. Ese fue el año en el que no pude más. Me fallaste.

Un día, sentí como si el suelo estuviera ausente y no había nada que impidiera mi caída. Este fue el año en el que salí como trans*. Fue el año en el que tuve que pagar por la cirugía que afirmaba mi género. Este fue el año en el que fui el chivo expiatorio y se me dijo mierda a la cara. 

El año en el que paré de hacer arte, fue antes del COVID-19. No se necesitó de una pandemia para terminar con mi carrera, simplemente no pude pagar mi declaración de impuestos a tiempo. Era 2019, y tuve un accidente en bicicleta durante uno de mis turnos entregando comida a las puertas de la gente. El año en el que paré de hacer arte, para ser despedidx del arte, no hubo necesidad de que los países más ricos del mundo se fuesen a un total confinamiento.

Fue tan mundano que nadie se dio cuenta.

Nadie se dio cuenta porque no pude hacer una obra sobre eso. No pude convertirlo en arte. Simplemente terminó. Mis exposiciones fueron canceladas, y nadie me pagaba, nadie me veía.

Había sido artista por demasiado tiempo como para ser contratadx por cualquier compañía fuera de ese mundo. Ningún restaurante daría trabajo a alguien con tan poca experiencia en hospitalidad.

The mushroom book. A popular guide to the identification and study of our commoner Fungi, with special emphasis on the edible varieties por Nina L. Marshall (New York, ed. Doubleday, 1902). Imagen: The Biodiversity Heritage Library

El año en el que paré de hacer arte fue el año en el que mi maestra de secundaria decidió que sería un buen técnico de fábrica. Aquel, fue el año en el que mis padres se mudaron lejos, lejos del centro; apenas a las afueras de los suburbios. El año en el que paré de hacer arte fue cuando caí en cuenta de que debía de hablar múltiples idiomas para poder ser artista; que tenía que tener una computadora con acceso ilimitado a Internet y un smartphone para responder a todos mis correos al instante. El año en el que tuve que renunciar fue el año en el que tuve que ir a tu museo para verte. Me encontraba luchando contra la depresión y mi enfermedad mental.

Era 1957, y mi esposx tuvo que respaldar cada gasto realizado. Era 1578, fui lanzado a un río, mis manos atadas a mis pies. Ese fue el año en el que pensaron que era una bruja. Fue en 2008, cuando me volví vagabundx porque todos mis beneficios me fueron retirados y no me pagaste. Todo terminó cuando descubrí que era la única persona negra en tu opening. Terminó cuando tuve que limpiar los pisos de habitaciones de hotel, aeropuertos y trenes para llegar a fin de mes. Fue entonces cuando te vi caminar en el salón de negocios. Reconocí tu olor al pasar. Resultó que vendían una versión falsa de tu perfume en un mercado local. Casi olía igual que tú durante el año en el que paré de hacer arte. Oler como tú era mi camuflaje; lo cual no hizo ninguna diferencia en 2020, cuando me vi forzado a parar debido al frágil estado de mis finanzas.

Al día siguiente, tú y yo aún olíamos la misma fragancia perfumada de hoja de higuera que rocías en tu pelo y en tu cuello cada mañana. Estabas en tu oficina en el museo, el día en el que el presidente decidió prohibir el acceso a varias instituciones del país para prevenir que el virus se esparciera. Te aplicaste gel antibacterial en las manos y muñecas cuidadosamente, lo cual prevendría que te contaminaras. Acto seguido, checaste tu cuenta de banco en tu celular. Pensaste: “todo estará bien hasta que termine”. Recién habías cobrado la renta a tu inquilinx, tu baja por enfermedad remunerada, los bitcoins que alguien extrajo por ti durante la noche. El año en el que paré de hacer arte comenzaste a intercambiarlos. 

En el 2016 me aseguré de que no hablaría con nadie sobre lo que pasó en el estudio, en tu oficina, en tu apartamento, en los baños de la feria. Fue el año en el que, repetidamente, torcías mis palabras. Te aseguraste de que tu abuso verbal fuera considerado una insinuación para cualquiera que escuchara tu versión de la historia; el lado en el que yace tu verdadero poder. Este fue el año en el que me sentí demasiado avergonzadx como para hablar de ello: el año en el que dejé de hacer arte fue el año en el que me hice pequeñx. El año en el que me recordaron que mi visibilidad jamás estaría a la medida de tu estabilidad económica. 

The mushroom book. A popular guide to the identification and study of our commoner Fungi, with special emphasis on the edible varieties por Nina L. Marshall (New York, ed. Doubleday, 1902). Imagen: The Biodiversity Heritage Library

Así fue que, en los últimos meses del 2020, en casa, en cama, y sin recibir pago alguno por parte del museo, supe que este sería el año en el que pararía el arte. O, ¿cómo es que iba a lograr pagar mis gastos? Esto iba para largo, decían. “Siento escuchar por lo que estás pasando. Son tiempos difíciles para todxs nosotrxs,” me dijiste. Me pregunto a quiénes te referías con “todxs”, ya que no me sentí parte de tu nosotrxs.

El año en el que paré de hacer arte, es cuando me di cuenta que no te podría importar más porque no tenías el porqué de hacerlo. No eras parte de esto, porque no tenías que serlo. Ese fue el año en el que me percaté que cuando dijiste “nosotrxs” quisiste decir “ellxs”, y que esa era la razón por la que aún podías hablar y twittear cuando nadie más lo hacía. Personificaste la forma más sabia de la ignorancia.

El año en el que paré de hacer arte es el año en el que recordé que no tenía en qué caer muertx; que no tenía soporte alguno que me sostuviera durante esta prueba del tiempo, como tú. Que era demasiado ingenux para pensar que podría salir de esto, como tú.

“¡A trotar!”. Tomaste la curva y no te pude seguir el paso, dejándome saborear la estela de tu perfume, nuestro perfume.

El año en el que paré de hacer arte es el año en el que casi huelo igual que tú, pero sólo para descubrir que, para ti, yo siempre iba a ser un aroma falso. 

Marzo del 2020

—-

Paul Maheke (n. 1985, Francia) vive y trabaja en Londres. Con un enfoque en la danza y a través de un cuerpo de trabajo variado y a menudo colaborativo que comprende performance, instalación, sonido y video, Maheke considera el potencial del cuerpo como un archivo para examinar cómo se forman y constituyen la memoria y la identidad.

—-

Este artículo fue publicado por DOCUMENTATIONS en marzo de 2020. DOCUMENTATIONS es un medio de comunicación participativo que lucha contra los discursos conservadores y hegemónicos que gobiernan al arte actualmente. 

Tags: , , , ,

El CIPEI -f,+s (Menos Foucault, más Shakira) presenta su bloque IV: “Ficciones y regímenes de representación”

Ontologías pictóricas

Marginalia 54

Los justos desconocidos