Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Texas Contemporary 2015

by Andy Campbell Houston, Texas 10/01/2015 – 10/04/2015
DSC00766 copy

Brandon Vickerd, Sputnik Returned, 2013, Stainless Steel, 60 feet by 12 x 6 feet. Courtesy of Texas Contemporary and Art Mûr

There’s a 1931 Gershwin love song whose first verse goes like this:

Blah blah blah blah moon
Blah blah blah blah above
Blah blah blah blah croon
Blah blah blah blah love

Perhaps you already know where I’m going with this. The song is both knowing and droll, letting a listener in on the fact that it’s okay to be charmed by an over-simplistic rhyming scheme, and to even revel in a genre which relies on such oversimplification, just as long as one keeps in sight the broader game. With the Gershwins, we might call the broader game “popular song,” with the Texas Contemporary, it’s “art fair.”

Begun in 2011, the Texas Contemporary is an annual event produced by Art Market Productions, a Brooklyn-based company that also generates fairs in Miami, New York, and Seattle. Art Market Productions claims, via its website, to be “dedicated to improving the art world by creating platforms and expanding networks of connection.” That may be so, but platforms for whom? Connections to whom? Questions left unanswered.

It is neither original nor revelatory to critique an art fair for supporting and iterating the worst of Late Capitalism—and believe, there’s plenty to fuel such a critique: non-profit art spaces given impoverished exhibition space and slummed together at the back of the exhibit hall; colorful and inviting spaces to rest are marked off for VIP access only; and an under-conceptualized grouping of public projects that vacillate wildly between shiny crowd pleasers and politically-minded art (the latter defanged by its context).

Yet there was at least one aspect of the Texas Contemporary that was both surprising and generative, a special curated section of seven galleries and two non-profit spaces from Mexico City, entitled The Other Mexico. This should ring a bell for anyone familiar with the history of Mexican literature, as it is a call to Octavio Paz’ 1973 text of the same name. The curator of The Other Mexico, Leslie Moody Castro, is right to invoke such a luminous set of essays in the context of an art fair. For example, Paz writes about insidious notions of progress in his “Critique of the Pyramid,” stating that, “It has given us more things but not more being.” Paz’s words seem tailor-made for art fairs, spare and incriminating language for theaters of excess.

But what The Other Mexico has going for it is precisely what separates it from the fair at-large, namely that it gives a sense of breadth and depth in regards to Mexico’s thriving contemporary gallery scene. The Mexican Consulate paid for the galleries’ booth spaces, and there was a small clutch of programming (parties and walkthroughs, mostly) geared towards boosting the signal of the eight participating spaces from Mexico City. Two of the eight galleries representing Mexico City, MARSO and Yautepec Galería, began as non-profits and have since transitioned into commercial galleries—making the case for a particularized hybrid coming out of D.F. Castro also programmed Casa Maauad into the mix, whose funding model includes selling a handsome suite of artists’multiples. The galleries included in The Other Mexico showed a tendency towards photo conceptualism and abstract painting: the small, earthen bilds by Tomás Díaz Cedeño (Yautepec Galería) betraying the industrial materials that frame them, and the large-scale photograph of a plane breaking the sound barrier by Andrea Galvani (MARSO) that pushes the limits of photography. These are just two examples of a rich showcase of artists from The Other Mexico galleries.

IMG_0261

View of MARSO Gallery at Texas Contemporary. Left: Andrea Galvani. Right: Tomás Díaz Cedeño.

Andrea Galvani © 2015 Llevando una pepita de oro #7

Andrea Galvani, Llevando una pepita de oro a la velocidad del sonido #7, courtesy of MARSO Gallery

As for the rest of the fair, if there is a poetics to be found it’s distinctly Houstonian in its flavor. While the art fair continued over four days in a third floor exhibit hall of the George R. Brown Convention Center, the largest exhibit hall on the first floor was being prepared for Breakbulk Americas —a conference for large-scale shippers and cargo companies. (An aside: people complain about art jargon, but this critic finds corporate portmanteaus and jingoisms more offensive: a Breakbulk conference banner outside the convention center proclaims of “micro-seminars” and “swim-up sessions”). Houston’s art scene has always been predicated on the oil business and its related industries (shipping included), and so the fact that contemporary art is spatially “floated” atop petroleum, is too good to ignore.

There’s a vast heterogeneity, as with most any fair, to the quality of the work being shown. And if a viewer can get over their internal critic (“What are woven baskets doing here?” or, “Word Art? Hate it!”), the experience can be pretty enlivening. That the work of Camel Collective and Yoshua Okón (both appearing at the booth of the youngest gallery in the fair, Parque Galería) are shown a short walk away from gee-whiz, colored pencil relief sculptures of Federico Uribe (Adelson Galleries), or the barely tongue-in-cheek art historical riffs of Chris Antemann and Deborah Azzopardi (Cynthia Corbett Gallery) is indicative of the fact that we live in art worlds, not an art world. Good medicine or depressing news, depending on your outlook. This goes for the visitors who came out to the Texas Contemporary as well. Beyond the collector’s VIP opening night party, for the most part, fair attendees tended to be middle-class folks, perusing the fair on a weekend afternoon and then maybe later going to the Greek Festival in nearby Montrose for some souvlaki.

WalMartShoppers-Chiken-YoshuaOkon-Parque

Yoshua Okón, Wall Mart Shoppers, 2015. Courtesy of Parque Galería

WalMartShoppers-Frogs-YoshuaOkon-Parque

Yoshua Okón, Wall Mart Shoppers, 2015. Courtesy of Parque Galería.

Perhaps, then, I should return to my initial comments regarding the unoriginality of critiquing an art fair for being the art market’s prima facie. I actually don’t mind that an art fair is the face of a system that places an exchange value on art and what artists produce—I’m truly happy to see artists and their gallerists get a payday—rather, I care what kind of Capitalism is being invoked in the framing of the fair. Saying this will no doubt drive all my hard-liner Marxist friends mad, because there is only one kind of Capitalism in their view, in which everything is a piece, but stay with me, comrades. The aforementioned treatment of the non-profit spaces at the Texas Contemporary, for example, is not just a nitpicky gripe about wallspace and placement, but rather illuminates, because it cleaves too closely to the ways in which non-profits have to scrounge, beg, and vie for limited economic resources outside of the convention center walls. In other words, the Texas Contemporary takes as its model a strand of corporate Capitalism that imagines itself to be beneficent cultural patrons, the motto being “something is better than nothing.” The treatment of non-profit art spaces who can’t or won’t shell out the significant sums of cash for a proper booth, re-performs the logic that non-profit spaces are loss leaders in purely economic terms, without paying enough attention to the projects and energy they could bring to the table. Seeing Project Row Houses, a storied Houston institution,which has consistently drawn attention to the complex racial politics of this city, given five feet of space to play with is not only depressing, but demoralizing. The flip side of this could be valuing and gifting non-profit spaces a significant (or at least equal) amount of space to realize projects and programming that could be central to the art fair experience. It’s a tricky proposition to be sure, because the danger would then become how to make use of the goodwill and talents of non-profits and associated artists without grossly instrumentalizing them. Still, I think we can agree that such a scenario would be better than a ghettoized section near the bathrooms.

And so, with apologies to both Gershwins and to Octavio Paz:
Blah blah blah blah less
Blah blah blah blah things
Blah blah blah blah more
Blah blah blah blah being.

 

DSC00766 copy

Brandon Vickerd, Sputnik Returned, 2013, acero inoxidable, 60 pies x 12 x 6 pies. Cortesía de Texas Contemporary y Art Mûr.

Hay una canción de amor de Gershwin 1931 cuya primera estrofa dice así:

Blah blah blah blah moon
Blah blah blah blah above
Blah blah blah blah croon
Blah blah blah blah love

Tal vez usted ya sabe a donde voy con esto. La canción es tanto sabia como graciosa, diciéndole al oyente que está bien ser encantado por un esquema de rima excesivamente simplista e incluso deleitarse en un género que se basa en dicha simplificación, siempre y cuando uno tenga en mente el juego más amplio que se está jugando. Con los Gershwin, este juego más amplio podría llamarse “canción popular,” con Texas Contemporary sería “feria de arte.”

Iniciado en 2011, Texas Contemporary es un evento anual producido por Art Market Productions, una compañía con sede en Brooklyn que también genera ferias en Miami, Nueva York y Seattle. Art Market Productions afirma en su sitio web estar “dedicados a mejorar el mundo del arte mediante la creación de plataformas y ampliando redes de conexión.” Eso puede ser cierto, pero, ¿para quién son estas plataformas? ¿A quién conectan? Preguntas que quedan sin respuesta.

No es ni original ni revelador el criticar una feria de arte por apoyar y resaltar lo peor del capitalismo tardío, y de hecho en este caso hay muchos factores para alimentar tal crítica: los espacios de arte sin fines de lucro estaban ubicados en los peores lugares, apretados en la parte posterior de la exposición; los espacios coloridos y acogedores para descansar estaban marcados sólo para el acceso VIP; y un grupo de proyectos públicos pobremente conceptualizados vacilaban entre agradar a la multitud con piezas vistosas por un lado, y arte político por otro (este último desarmado por su contexto).

Sin embargo, al menos un aspecto de Texas Contemporary era a la vez sorprendente y generativo, una sección especial curada con siete galerías y dos espacios sin fines de lucro de la Ciudad de México, titulado El Otro México. Esto debe sonar conocido para cualquiera familiarizado con la historia de la literatura mexicana, ya que es una guiño al texto de Octavio Paz de 1973 del mismo nombre. La curadora de El Otro México, Leslie Moody Castro, tiene razón al invocar un conjunto tan luminoso de ensayos en el contexto de una feria de arte. Por ejemplo, Paz escribe sobre nociones insidiosas de progreso en su Crítica de la pirámide, afirmando que “nos ha dado más cosas, pero no más ser.” Las palabras de Paz parecen hechas a la medida para las ferias de arte, un lenguaje libre y de denuncia para estos teatros del exceso.

Pero lo que El Otro México tiene a su favor es precisamente lo que lo separa de la feria en general, y es que da una sensación de amplitud y profundidad en cuanto a la próspera escena galerística contemporánea de México. El Consulado de México pagó por los espacios de los stands de las galerías, y había una porción de programación (fiestas y recorridos, en su mayoría) orientada a impulsar la actividad de los ocho espacios participantes de la Ciudad de México. Dos de las ocho galerías que representan a la ciudad de México, MARSO y Yautepec, comenzaron como espacios sin fines de lucro, y desde entonces han vivido una transición a galerías comerciales – figuras de híbridos particulares que salen del DF. Castro también programó a Casa Maauad en la mezcla, cuyo modelo de financiación incluye la venta de un atractivo paquete de múltiples de artistas. Las galerías incluidas en El Otro México mostraron una tendencia hacia el conceptualismo fotográfico y la pintura abstracta: las pequeñas imágenes de Tomás Díaz Cedeño (Yautepec Galería) que traicionan los materiales industriales que las enmarcan, y la fotografía a gran escala de un avión rompiendo la barrera del sonido de Andrea Galvani (MARSO) que empuja los límites de la fotografía. Estos son sólo dos ejemplos de una rica selección de artistas de las galerías del Otro México.

IMG_0261

View of MARSO Gallery at Texas Contemporary

Andrea Galvani © 2015 Llevando una pepita de oro #7

Andrea Galvani, Llevando una pepita de oro a la velocidad del sonido #7, courtesy of MARSO Gallery

En cuanto al resto de la feria, si hay una poética en ella, es claramente muy “de Houston.” Si bien la feria de arte tuvo lugar durante cuatro días en una sala de exposiciones del tercer piso del Centro de Convenciones George R. Brown, la mayor sala de exposiciones en el primer piso se estaba preparando para Breakbulk Americas –una conferencia para transportadores de gran escala y empresas de carga. (Una nota aparte: las personas se quejan del argot del arte, pero este servidor encuentra el argot corporativo más ofensivo: un banner de la conferencia Breakbulk afuera del centro de convenciones proclama “micro-seminarios” y “sesiones de swim-up“). La escena del arte de Houston siempre se ha basado en el negocio del petróleo y sus industrias relativas (transporte incluido), por lo que el hecho de que el arte contemporáneo esté “flotando” espacialmente sobre el petróleo es demasiado bueno para ser ignorado.

Hay una gran heterogeneidad, al igual que con la mayoría de las ferias, en la calidad del trabajo que se muestra. Y si el espectador puede superar a su crítico interno: “¿Qué hacen estos cestos tejidos aquí?”, o “¿la palabra arte? ¡la odio!”, la experiencia puede ser muy estimulante. Que el trabajo de Camel collective y de Yoshua Okón (ambos en el stand de la galería más joven de la feria, Parque Galería, de Ciudad de México) se muestren a pocos pasos de distancia de las coloridas esculturas hechas con lápices de Federico Uribe (Adelson Galleries), o la repetición irónica de la historia del arte de Chris Antemann y Deborah Azzopardi (Cynthia Corbett Galería) es indicativo de que vivimos en mundos de arte, no en un mundo del arte. Buena medicina o noticias deprimentes, dependiendo de su perspectiva. Esto también va para los visitantes de Texas Contemporary. Más allá de la fiesta de apertura VIP de la noche de colecionistas, en su mayor parte, los asistentes de la feria tendían a ser gente de clase media, paseándose en una tarde de fin de semana, y tal vez irían más tarde al festival griego en los alrededores de Montrose por unos souvlaki.

WalMartShoppers-Chiken-YoshuaOkon-Parque

Yoshua Okón, Wall Mart Shoppers, 2015. Cortesía de Parque Galería

WalMartShoppers-Frogs-YoshuaOkon-Parque

Yoshua Okón, Wall Mart Shoppers, 2015. Cortesía de Parque Galería.

Quizás, entonces, debo volver a mis comentarios iniciales sobre la falta de originalidad que yace en criticar a una feria de arte por ser la prima facie del mercado del arte. En realidad no me importa que una feria de arte sea la cara de un sistema que asigna un valor de cambio sobre el arte y lo que los artistas producen –me alegro sinceramente de ver a los artistas y sus galeristas conseguir su sustento. Más bien, me importa en qué tipo de capitalismo se enmarca la feria. Decir esto sin duda va a enfurecer a todos mis amigos marxistas de línea dura, pues sólo hay un tipo de capitalismo en su opinión, en el que todo es una pieza vendible. Pero quédense conmigo, camaradas. El tratamiento antes mencionado de los espacios sin fines de lucro en Texas Contemporary, por ejemplo, no es sólo una queja quisquillosa sobre las paredes y la disposición, sino que es iluminador, pues se acerca demasiado a las maneras en que las organizaciones no lucrativas tienen que mendigar, suplicar y competir por recursos económicos limitados fuera de las paredes del centro de convenciones. En otras palabras, Texas Contemporary toma como modelo una vertiente del capitalismo corporativo que se imagina como mecenas cultural benéfico, y su mantra viene a ser “algo es mejor que nada.” El tratamiento de los espacios de arte sin fines de lucro que no pueden desembolsar las importantes sumas de dinero en efectivo para un stand propio, significa aplicar la lógica según la cual estos espacios  son líderes de la pérdida en términos puramente económicos, sin prestar suficiente atención a los proyectos y energía que éstos podrían traer. Al ver Project Row Houses, una institución legendaria de Houston –que ha señalado sistemáticamente la compleja política racial de esta ciudad– instalada en cinco pies de espacio no sólo es deprimente, sino desmoralizador. La otra cara de esto sería la valoración y donación a espacios sin fines de lucro de una cantidad significativa (o al menos equivalente) de espacio para la realización de proyectos y programas que podrían ser fundamentales para la experiencia de la feria de arte. Es un asunto claramente complicado, pues el peligro sería entonces cómo hacer uso de la buena voluntad y el talento de las organizaciones no lucrativas y sus artistas asociados, sin instrumentalizarlos groseramente. Aún así, creo que podemos estar de acuerdo en que este escenario sería mejor que una sección estilo ghetto al lado de los baños.

 

Y así, con perdón de ambos Gershwin y Octavio Paz:
Blah blah blah blah less
Blah blah blah blah things
Blah blah blah blah more
Blah blah blah blah being.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Remote Control

Tacita Dean

RE : pùblica

The Reason We No Longer Speak