Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

History is taking flight and passes forever

Edgar Orlaineta

Proyectos Monclova Mexico City, México 11/17/2016 – 01/14/2017
orlaineta-2b

Edgar Orlaineta, Anachronic Coffee Table-Moon Dancer (after Isamu Noguchi), 2016. Walnut, wax, magazine (Coronet, March 1953), vintage pin (“JAP HUNTING LICENSE. OPEN SEASON-NO LIMIT”), news clipping (“The moon dancer”, story about a Japanese-American dancer called Yuriko), Measured Time clock and kitchen timer (designed by Isamu Noguchi, USA, ca. 1932). Courtesy of the artist and PROYECTOSMONCLOVA. Photo: Patrick López Jaimes

orlaineta-4

Edgar Orlaineta, Venus (Tura Satana), 2016. Watercolor on paper, vintage slide viewer with 16mm positive frames, brass, walnut, shell, pearl created with the silver extracted from a vintage Tura Satana 16mm positive by inserting it into a living clam and recovering it after 6 months. Courtesy of the artist and PROYECTOSMONCLOVA. Photo: Patrick López Jaimes

pmonclova-or1

Edgar Orlaineta – History is taking flight and passes forever. Installation view at PROYECTOSMONCLOVA, Mexico City, 2016. Courtesy of the artist and PROYECTOSMONCLOVA. Photo: Patrick López Jaimes

Edgar Orlaineta’s most recent project turns to the notion of Interlocking Sculptures, coined by Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) in the 1940s. The legacy of Noguchi, who was born in Los Angeles to a Japanese father and an American mother, is noted for its sculptural experimentation linked to furniture and lamp design, as well as to costumes and scenography, which are the point of departure to Edgar Orlaineta’s investigation. Based on this legacy, the exhibition History is taking flight and passes forever is divided in two episodes. While the first room formally echoes the work of Noguchi, the second has as starting point the work of industrial designer Ray Komai. The show’s title refers to a fragment written by Isamu Noguchi in a letter addressed to Man Ray in which he shares his frustration of being held captive in an internment camp in Poston, Arizona.

By scrutinizing the relationship between Noguchi and these internment camps, established in the USA after Pearl Harbors’ bombing (December 7, 1941), Orlaineta conceived a series of sculptures based on formal, aesthetic and conceptual «knots», whose leitmotiv are the lives and creations of those artists effected by said events. By incorporating a selection of memorabilia and design objects into the works that reinterpret the Interlocking Sculptures, the project expands this notion and approximates new aspects in which the formal becomes historical, whilst the exhibition itself becomes a sort of stage linking the aesthetic to the social and political. Through this combination of «formal knots» the artist interweaves aesthetic concepts with historical references, thus creating a tension between «autonomous pieces» –that is formalist sculptures– and «heterogeneous dispositives»: book shelves, acquired objects, ready-mades, fetishes, etc. In this sense, the combination of resources give way for the «autonomous» works to inscribe a particular historic imaginary –the suspension of human rights and racism–, eluding the classic notion of the public commemorative monument, whose purpose is to recall national triumphs.

The concept of Interlocking Sculptures (sculptures assembled with an equilibrium of each individual element) is initially conceived in the formal reproduction of the same biomorphic elements and materials used by Noguchi. Thus, the exhibition is allied to an aesthetic that favors the artisanal over the industrial: carved and turned wood, folded brass, serigraphy on linen and paper, metal and plywood constructions as well as a pearl with a silver center originating from a 16mm black and white positive. As a whole, this show can be read as a stage which displays not only the technical and aesthetical aspects of Noguchi’s legacy, but also the historic pertinence and social context in which such creations took place.

Throughout his artistic practice, Edgar Orlaineta has rigorously delved into studying the intersection between sculpture and design –the relationship between art, craft and the industrial–, which led him to collect memorabilia of distinct iconic artists and designers. Thus, the notion of interlocking proposed by the artist does not merely focus on technically resolving the ensemble between the sculptural and the found. In the same manner, Orlaineta pays tribute to distinct figures who, like Isamu Noguchi, lost their freedom during the Second World War and who went on to contribute substantially to the cultural and artistic development in the United States. Among those figures are Ruth Asawa, George Nakashima, Tura Satana, Ray Komai, Miné Okubo, Larry Shinoda, Yoneguma and Kiyoka Takahashi, to name a few.

The second exhibition room likewise touches upon issues of race and the stigma that Japanese-Americans suffered during the war. By interpreting a piece by Ray Komai titled Masks, which was designed for Laverne Originals (NY) in 1948, and inverting Komai’s well-known folded plywood chair (1949), now rebuilt by Orlaineta as a Wire Chair, aspects of camouflage and invisibility become virulent. The chairs and the white masks blend with the white cube, while the camouflaged fabrics and the peasant garments gain visibility. These camouflaged fabrics echo Komai’s patters, which were originally commissioned for Laverne Originals, a company that in turn was hired by the US government to produce military uniforms. Thus, the notion of the interlock bridges the two rooms in order to reflect on the aesthetics of the invisible. As a whole, the exhibition evidentiates historical and social issues around racial stigmatization, the violation of human rights and racism.

http://proyectosmonclova.com/

Text by Willy Kautz
Courtesy of Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City

orlaineta-2b

Edgar Orlaineta, Anachronic Coffee Table-Moon Dancer (after Isamu Noguchi), 2016. Walnut, wax, magazine (Coronet, March 1953), vintage pin (“JAP HUNTING LICENSE. OPEN SEASON-NO LIMIT”), news clipping (“The moon dancer”, story about a Japanese-American dancer called Yuriko), Measured Time clock and kitchen timer (designed by Isamu Noguchi, USA, ca. 1932). Courtesy of the artist and PROYECTOSMONCLOVA. Photo: Patrick López Jaimes

orlaineta-4

Edgar Orlaineta, Venus (Tura Satana), 2016. Watercolor on paper, vintage slide viewer with 16mm positive frames, brass, walnut, shell, pearl created with the silver extracted from a vintage Tura Satana 16mm positive by inserting it into a living clam and recovering it after 6 months. Courtesy of the artist and PROYECTOSMONCLOVA. Photo: Patrick López Jaimes

pmonclova-or1

Edgar Orlaineta – History is taking flight and passes forever. Installation view at PROYECTOSMONCLOVA, Mexico City, 2016. Courtesy of the artist and PROYECTOSMONCLOVA. Photo: Patrick López Jaimes

El proyecto más reciente de Edgar Orlaineta recurre al concepto de Interlocking Sculptures, acuñado por Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) en la década de los cuarenta. El legado del artista quien naciera en Los Ángeles de padre japonés y madre estadounidense, reconocido por su experimentación escultórica ligada al diseño de muebles y lámparas, como también al vestuario y la escenografía, son el punto de partida de la investigación de Edgar Orlaineta. Con base en este legado, la exposición, History is taking flight and passes forever [La historia está tomando vuelo y pasa por siempre], que se refiere a un fragmento escrito por Isamu Noguchi en una carta dirigida a Man Ray –en la cual le compartía su frustración al estar preso en un campo de concentración en Poston, Arizona–, se divide en dos secciones. Mientras que la primera sala tiene como soporte formal la obra de Noguchi; la segunda tiene como punto de partida el trabajo del diseñador industrial, Ray Komai.

A partir de escudriñar la relación entre Noguchi y los campos de concentración de japoneses tras el bombardeo al puerto de Pearl Harbor (7 de diciembre, 1941), Orlaineta concibió una serie de esculturas con base en «nudos» formales, estéticos y conceptuales, cuyo leitmotiv son los artistas cuyas vidas fueron trastocadas por dicho evento bélico. Al desplegar una selección de memorabilia y objetos de diseño sobre la serie de esculturas que reinterpretan las Interlock Sculptures, este proyecto desborda esta noción hacia nuevas variantes en las que lo formal deviene histórico, al tiempo que la exposición misma se vuelve una suerte de escenografía que enlaza lo estético con lo social y lo político. Por medio de esta combinatoria de «nudos formales», el artista entreteje conceptos estéticos con referencias históricas, creando una tensión entre «obras autónomas», esto es, esculturas formalistas; y los «dispositivos heterogéneos»: estantes de libros, objetos adquiridos, ready-mades, fetiches, etc. En este sentido, la combinatoria de recursos dan paso a que las obras «autónomas» suscriban un imaginario histórico particular –la suspensión de los derechos humanos y el racismo–, eludiendo así la noción clásica del monumento público conmemorativo, cuyo fin es rememorar los triunfos nacionales.

El concepto de Interlocking Sculptures (esculturas ensambladas por medio del equilibrio entre las partes), se concibe en primera instancia en la reproducción formal de los mismos elementos biomórficos y materiales que utilizara Noguchi. La exposición, por lo tanto, se subsume a la estética que valorizaba lo artesanal sobre lo industrial: madera tallada y torneada, rechazado y doblado de latón, serigrafía sobre lino y papel, construcciones de metal y triplay, hasta una perla con centro de plata extraída de un positivo blanco y negro de 16mm. En su conjunto, esta muestra puede concebirse como una escenografía que trae a la vista no sólo el aspecto técnico y estético del legado de Noguchi, sino también la pertinencia histórica y el contexto social en el que dichas creaciones tuvieron lugar.

Por medio de su obra Edgar Orlaineta se ha empeñado en estudiar rigurosamente la intersección entre la escultura y el diseño, o bien, la relación entre el arte, lo artesanal y lo industrial, lo que lo ha llevado a coleccionar la memorabilia de diversos artistas y diseñadores icónicos. En este sentido, el concepto de interlocking que propone Orlaineta, no se centró solamente en la resolución técnica de ensamblado de las esculturas, una vez que a éstas se suman una serie de referencias históricas. De igual forma, Orlaineta rinde homenaje a diferentes personas quienes, así como Isamu Noguchi, perdieron su libertad durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial y que a la postre contribuyeron de manera importante al desarrollo cultural y artístico de Estados Unidos. Entre estas personalidades están Ruth Asawa, George Nakashima, Tura Satana, Ray Komai, Miné Okubo, Larry Shinoda, Yoneguma y Kiyoka Takahashi, entre otros.

Asimismo, la segunda sala de la exposición dialoga con el tema del racismo y el estigma que padecieron los japoneses estadounidenses durante la guerra. Al interpretar una tela de Ray Komai titulada Masks, diseñada para Laverne Originals (NY) en 1948, aunado a una inversión de su reconocida silla de triplay doblado (1949), ahora reconstruida por Orlaineta como una silla Wire Chair, se pone a discusión el tema del camuflaje y la invisibilidad. Las sillas y las máscaras blancas se mimetizan con el fondo del cubo blanco, así como la máscara de nieve, al tiempo que las telas camuflajeadas y los trajes de campesinos cobran visibilidad. Las telas de camuflaje hacen eco de los patrones diseñados por Komai, originalmente comisionados a Laverne Originals, empresa tomada por el gobierno de Estados Unidos para producir trajes de guerra. De esta manera, el concepto de interlock, crea un puente de conexiones entre ambas salas para reflexionar sobre la estética de la invisibilidad. En su conjunto, la exposición coloca a «la vista» los temas históricos y sociales de la estigmatización racial, la violación de los derechos humanos y del racismo.

http://proyectosmonclova.com/

Texto de Willy Kautz
Cortesía de Proyectos Monclova, Ciudad de México

Tags: , , , , ,

On Some Future

Programa C / Desarrollo involutivo

Jennie C. Jones: Compilation

From the Object to the World – Inhotim Collection