Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

The vanity of being productive 

By Lucrecia Martel and Manuel Kalmanovitz

The Argentine film director confers with Manuel Kalmanovitz on her particular vision of the world and the confrontation with the strangeness of the real in her films.

La directora de cine argentina discute con Manuel Kalmanovitz sobre su visión particular del mundo y el enfrentamiento a la extrañeza de lo real en sus películas.

Martel Rio

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

The three feature films Lucrecia Martel has made over the course of her career outline a very particular universe that resides between what is seen and what is heard, amid something disturbing and mysterious that’s floating around —something that unnerves, a source of anguish.

Whether it’s in the dynamics of a messed-up family on the genteel skids (La ciénaga, 2001), an intense teenage girl’s perverse anxieties about sanctity (La niña santa, 2004) or a woman’s displacement after an incident on the road (La mujer sin cabeza, 2008), Martel’s filmmaking constantly questions its characters’ worlds until it discovers that everything to which they are accustomed —what each of them imagines normal— is in fact as deeply bizarre as any other human habit that, by way of perseverance, ends up becoming invisible.

We reached Martel by e-mail with questions about difficulties that come from transiting a vision of the world, making movies in the present day, navigating the information glut that assaults us or just coming home. She very graciously took time to answer our questions while doing the sound editing on her new picture, Zama, an adaptation of Antonio di Benedetto’s novel about an eighteenth-century Spanish functionary whose transfer to Buenos Aires is repeatedly delayed.

Clapboard

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

Manuel Kalmanovitz: The theme of this Terremoto issue is “a praise of difficulty.” So I’d like to start by asking you about your beginnings in filmmaking, because starting with La ciénaga, your first film, there’s a clear vision of the world —and cinema— that’s completely formed, very personal and very distinct. Can you tell us how all that happened? How did you realize your vision was different from that of most of your generational peers and what was the process of making that a reality?

Lucrecia Martel: It would be difficult to find something made by a human being that isn’t pregnant with a vision of the world. Likely impossible. It’s inherent to existence. It turns out that world visions can coincide with a certain hegemonic idea of what the world is —or not. It’s like when they say that “indie cinema” is intellectual, simply because it does not coincide with a narrative system the industry legitimates. But the industry is as intellectual as “indie” movies. The difference is that one affirms reality, doesn’t call it into question. And not all “art movies” are after that.

You’ve got to call reality into doubt. Or better yet, I’d say you’ve got to be suspicious of reality. Because if you’re not, there’s no possible transformation. Every one of us who has done cinema —to speak just of moviemaking— has contributed our perspectives to a vision of the world. A community needs that —lots of perspectives. There will be times when some are valued more than others. But the really important thing is that a lot of different visions coexist. The big task is to facilitate that variety.

Daniel1

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

MK: One of your recent concerns, that you’ve mentioned in several interviews, is the fact the cinema is in the hands of a particular social class; that directors tend to come from the upper middle classes, with a consequent flattening of outcomes. Following this month’s theme in Terremoto, it strikes me we could also call this effort you suggest, of fighting the class-homogeneity that also reflects the homogenization of the global, a difficulty. How do you think that trend can be counteracted? And why is it important?

LM: Unwittingly, new technologies are giving rise to a phenomenon of more varied access to public discourse. That something we have in a bag or a pocket can document images and sound allows us to imagine that more people will access the production of an audiovisual discourse. Sadly, history shows us having low-cost pens is not enough to create writers. You have to find ways of preventing single, exclusionary visions from being established. Homogeneity is the enemy. Our existence is short, absurd and highly mysterious. We need everyone because we do not know where we’re going.

Dead Horse

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

MK: Ever since you began making films, in 2001, moviemaking has undergone a material revolution with the rise of digital cameras, some relatively cheap and of decent quality, that have afforded access to people who want to do things. Though even this, of course, has brought on a series of problems when it comes to distribution, accessing screens and the possibility that films resonate more widely. How do you see that evolution? What would you think if you were starting to make films right now?

LM: With regard to that change in audiovisual technology, what most interests me is the transformation of visual perspective. For many centuries, perspective has represented the human gaze. The images drones, or sport cameras, that telephones are producing may not be the human gaze. That interests me. Objects are beginning to make manifest an entire new world. What is that world? If I were starting out now, I wouldn’t do films, nor do I think I’d produce images. I’d edit YouTube images. Images others had made.

Lola

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

MK: Once we spoke of the interest you have for horror movies, with the particular way they explore time and space. I remember back then you were contemplating doing a picture about some family members that come to live in a house they can’t get out of… So I wanted to ask you something more general about these projects you contemplate, and that you nurse to life, and you go over and over them and then they get put off or never get made. What’s your relationship to these ideas? Wherein lies the difficulty of these projects not getting made?

LM: Things that just occur to you aren’t ideas. I’ve read thousands of screenplay pages that are lousy with things that have occurred to people —but don’t have a single idea. And curiously, not even ideas are enough for a film, or a book, or whatever it is that doesn’t yet exist. That script you’re talking about —for now— is in the “occurrences” zone. I stopped just in time, before convincing myself there was something to it. Sometimes the timing of contests, grants, workshops pushes you to look at occurrences in another way. You’ve got to be really patient, avoid the vanity of being productive. The process of questioning the world is not so simple. Variety and difference are important. These are not things you lay hands on by goofing around. I take care not to pollute the planet with my stuff. Each time I hear a production house is looking for content, it makes me shudder. Because of the brazen honesty of it. They want content because there are containers. All this smacks of garbage. I think we’re in an age of producing for no good reason. And soon the age of editing for no good reason will come.

Martel VF

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

MK: It’s been fifteen years since you finished your first film and I wanted to ask how the difficulties you face when making a film have changed. Over time, have the process and the experience grown easier? Have you discovered difficulties you never imagined?

LM: The biggest difficulty is wanting something so much that you dedicate so many years to it. For me, a white middle-class woman, that’s the biggest difficulty. There’s always the temptation to turn yourself into a space and just fill it with content.

MK: Finally I wanted to ask you about your return, to live, in Salta (Argentina), where you grew up and the city you left behind when you went to school in Buenos Aires, long ago. Can you speak of the difficulties and the benefits of returning to your birthplace?

LM: Going back to the towns where we were born often calls to mind Christ on a donkey as He entered Jerusalem. One probably identifies with Jesus. But most of the time, we’re that poor, tired donkey who’s stepping on the olives. Or the laurels. Yet even in all that confusion there’s happiness.

Martel Rio

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

Los tres largometrajes realizados por Lucrecia Martel en su carrera delinean un universo muy particular, que encuentra entre lo que se ve y lo que se escucha algo inquietante y misterioso que da vueltas por ahí, que molesta y angustia.

Ya sea en las dinámicas familiares en un entorno decadente (en La ciénaga, 2001) o en las perversas ansias de santidad de una adolescente intensa (en La niña santa, 2004) o en la desubicación de una mujer tras un suceso en la carretera (en La mujer sin cabeza, 2008), el cine de Martel constantemente cuestiona el mundo de sus personajes hasta descubrir que todo eso a lo que están acostumbrados, lo que cada uno considera normal, es en realidad tan profundamente bizarro como cualquier costumbre humana que, a punta de perseverancia, ha terminado por volverse invisible.

Contactamos a Martel vía correo electrónico con preguntas sobre las dificultades para transitar una visión del mundo, para hacer películas en el presente, para navegar el exceso de información que nos asedia o para volver a casa. Martel amablemente sacó tiempo para responderlas mientras edita el sonido de su nueva película, Zama, una adaptación de la novela de Antonio Di Benedetto sobre un funcionario español que espera largamente su traslado a Buenos Aires en el siglo XVIII.

Clapboard

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

Manuel Kalmanovitz: El tema de este número de Terremoto es el elogio a la dificultad y me gustaría empezar preguntándote sobre tus comienzos en el cine, porque desde La Ciénaga, tu primera película, se nota claramente una visión del mundo —y del cine— totalmente formada, muy personal, muy distintiva. ¿Puedes hablar de cómo pasó eso? ¿Cómo te diste cuenta de que tenías una visión distinta a la de la mayoría de compañeros de tu generación y cómo fue ese proceso de hacerla realidad?

Lucrecia Martel: Debe ser difícil encontrar algo hecho por un ser humano que no esté preñado de una visión del mundo. Probablemente imposible. Es inherente a existir. Sucede que las visiones del mundo pueden coincidir con cierta idea hegemónica de lo que es el mundo, o no. Es como cuando dicen que el cine de autor es intelectual, sencillamente porque no coincide con un sistema narrativo legitimado por la industria. Pero la industria es tan intelectual como el cine de autor. La diferencia es que afirma la realidad, no la pone en duda. Y no todo el cine de autor pretende eso.

Es necesario dudar de la realidad, más bien diría sospechar de la realidad, porque si no, no hay transformación posible. Todos los que hemos hecho cine, por hablar sólo del cine, hemos contribuído con nuestras perspectivas a una visión del mundo. Una comunidad necesita eso, muchas perspectivas. Habrá momentos donde se valorará más a unas que a otras, pero lo realmente importante es que coexistan muchas diferentes. La gran tarea es facilitar esa variedad.

Daniel1

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

MK: Una de tus preocupaciones recientes, que has mencionado en varias entrevistas, es el hecho de que el cine está en manos de una clase social particular, que los directores tienden a ser todos de clase media alta, con el consecuente aplanamiento de sus resultados. Siguiendo con el tema de esta Terremoto, me parece que esto también podamos considerarlo una dificultad, esa tarea que sugieres de luchar contra esa homogeneización de clase que también refleja la homogeneización de lo global. ¿Cómo crees que se puede contrarrestar esta tendencia? ¿Por qué es importante hacerlo?

LM: Las nuevas tecnologías, sin pretenderlo, están generando un fenómeno de acceso más variado al discurso público. Que una cosa que llevamos en la cartera o el bolsillo sea capaz de registrar imágenes y sonido, permite suponer que habrá más personas accediendo a la producción de un discurso audiovisual. Lamentablemente la historia nos demuestra que no es suficiente el bajo costo de la pluma para que haya escritores. Hay que encontrar formas para impedir que se establezcan las visiones únicas. El enemigo es la homogeneidad. Nuestra existencia es corta, absurda y muy misteriosa. Necesitamos a todos, porque no sabemos para dónde vamos.

Dead Horse

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

MK: Desde que comenzaste a hacer películas, en 2001, el cine ha sufrido una revolución material con el surgimiento de cámaras digitales, algunas relativamente baratas y de buena calidad que han facilitado el acceso a quienes quieren hacer algo. Aunque eso, claro, también ha traído una serie de problemas en cuanto a distribución, acceso a las pantallas y posibilidades de que las películas resuenen de una forma más amplia. ¿Cómo ves esa revolución? ¿Qué pensarías si estuvieras comenzando a hacer cine en este momento?

LM: De este cambio en la tecnología audiovisual, lo que más me interesa es la transformación de la perspectiva visual. Por muchos siglos la perspectiva ha representado la mirada del ser humano. Las imágenes que producen los drones, las cámaras deportivas, los teléfonos, pueden no ser la mirada humana. Eso me interesa. Los objetos empiezan a manifestar un mundo. ¿Qué es ese mundo? Si estuviera comenzando hoy, no haría cine, por supuesto, ni creo que produciría imágenes. Me dedicaría a editar imágenes de YouTube. Imágenes hechas por otros.

Lola

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

MK: Alguna vez hablamos del interés que te despierta el cine de terror, con su forma particular de explorar tiempo y espacio. Recuerdo que en ese entonces estabas contemplando hacer una película sobre unos parientes que llegaban a vivir a una casa de donde no los podían sacar… entonces quería preguntarte algo más general sobre esos proyectos que contemplas y nutres y les das vueltas y luego se aplazan o no se hacen. ¿Cómo es esa relación con estas ideas? ¿Dónde reside la dificultad para que no se realicen?

LM: Las ocurrencias no son ideas. He leído miles de páginas de guiones plagadas de ocurrencias, y ninguna idea. Y curiosamente, ni las ideas son suficiente para una película, un libro, o lo que sea que no exista aún. Ese guión al que te referís está, por ahora, en la zona de las ocurrencias. Y lo paré a tiempo, antes de convencerme de que tenía algo. A veces las fechas de concursos, subsidios, talleres, te empujan a considerar las ocurrencias de otra manera. Hay que ser muy paciente, sustraerse a la vanidad de ser productivo. El proceso de dudar del mundo no es tan sencillo. Es importante la variedad, la diferencia. Esas no son cosas que se consigan a las tontas y a las locas. Yo me cuido de contaminar este planeta con mis cositas. Cada vez que escucho que una productora está buscando contenido, me da escalofrío. Por la descarada sinceridad del asunto. Quieren contenido porque hay contenedores. Todo eso suena un poco a basura. Creo que estamos en la era de producir sin ton ni son. Ya vendrá la era de editar sin ton ni son.

Martel VF

Zama, Lucrecia Martel, 2017. Feature film. Production stills. Courtesy of Lucrecia Martel.

MK: Han pasado 15 años desde que realizaste tu primera película y quería preguntarte sobre cómo han cambiado las dificultades que encuentras al momento de hacer una película. ¿El proceso se ha vuelto más fácil con el tiempo y la experiencia? ¿Has encontrado dificultades que no te imaginabas?

LM: La dificultad más grande es desear algo tanto, que uno dedique muchos años a eso. Para mí, mujer blanca de clase media, esa es la dificultad más grande. Siempre está la tentación de hacerse una pileta, y producir contenido.

MK: Por último quería preguntarte por tu regreso a vivir a Salta, la ciudad donde creciste y que dejaste cuando te fuiste a estudiar a Buenos Aires hace tiempo. ¿Puedes contarnos las dificultades y bondades de regresar a tu ciudad natal?

LM: Regresar a la ciudad natal nos remite con frecuencia a Jesús montado en un burro entrando a Jerusalén. Uno tiende a identificarse con Jesús, pero la mayoría de las veces, somos el burro cansado pisando olivos. O laureles. Y aún en esa confusión, existe la felicidad.

Tags: , , , ,

Paisaje sugerido

After the laughter

Tania Pérez Córdova

Enredos