Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

We Are Dogs in Love with our Own Vomit: Smuggling in the Everyday

By Matthew Stromberg and Daniel Joseph Martinez

A conversation between Matthew Stromberg and Daniel Joseph Martinez about the multiplicity of art and its ability to overturn specific contexts.

Una charla entre Matthew Stromberg y Daniel Joseph Martinez sobre la multiplicidad del arte y su capacidad de irrupción para volcar contextos específicos.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Call Me Ishmael: The Fully Enlightened Earth Radiates Disaster Triumphant, 2006. Animatronic sculpture, variable dimensions. Installation at United States Pavilion, Tenth International Biennale of Cairo, Museum of Modern Art, Cairo, 2006. Image courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

Daniel Joseph Martinez has no style. Or rather he has no signature style. It would be unlikely for a viewer to walk into a gallery or museum and proclaim upon seeing a work of his for the first time: “That is a Daniel Joseph Martinez”—as they might with a Rothko, a Warhol, or a Judd—based solely on its resemblance to his other works. The common thread throughout his oeuvre is not aesthetic, but conceptual. His works are unified not by how they look, but by what they do, and what they do is provoke. He challenges viewers not only to untangle his complex web of literary, artistic, and historical references, but also to consider their own relationship to the works, the artistic institutions in which they are situated, as well as culture at large. To this end, he employs a wide range of media and processes, from photography to text-based work, architectural constructions to animatronic robots. Lowbrow sci-fi, Nietzsche, Martha Stewart, Herman Melville, reductive minimalism, and the Black Panther Party are among the wide range of cultural touchstones that he draws from, often in the same work.

Our discussion avoided the literal connotations of smuggling—which in Los Angeles is often concerned with the US-Mexico border— and instead focused on the ways in which his work, in all its forms, traffics in ideas and subjects that subvert hegemonic narratives, often taking aim at the very institutions that make his work possible. The following conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Call Me Ishmael: The Fully Enlightened Earth Radiates Disaster Triumphant, 2006. Animatronic sculpture, variable dimensions. Installation at United States Pavilion, Tenth International Biennale of Cairo, Museum of Modern Art, Cairo, 2006. Image courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

Matthew Stromberg: So we ostensibly are talking about smuggling. There’s a very literal interpretation, which is illicitly moving goods, people, or drugs over borders. But then there’s kind of a more abstract notion of smuggling, which is moving ideas, or in some way subverting hegemonic structures. After I read Juli Carson’s essay “A Scaffolding of Viral Signifiers,” in which she notes that your “corpus is less humanoid than it is viral—an ‘organism’ whose indigenous ‘inside’ is given enduring life by an ‘outside’ agent,” the first thing I thought of was your tags from the 1993 Whitney Biennial. How do those function as a virus, or as a subversive element in some way?

Daniel Joseph Martinez: We were at the height of the culture wars in 1993. There was a kind of a swelling euphoria that, by the time the 90s came, we—meaning the kind of people who were on the cutting edge of culture production—recognized that there was an all-out assault taking place in this country, and that the only thing to do was resist. You did not just resist as a defensive posture, but you resisted in an offensive way. There was a sense that we were actually winning the war, which you have to imagine was extraordinary.

Thanks to Thelma Golden and Elisabeth Sussman, who smuggled a multi-platform discourse that was inclusive in every way possible into the Biennial, the exhibition was an actual portrait of the constituents of artists in the United States. For the first time in its entire history, the Biennial was overwhelmingly plural.

In a sense, they set up the possibility for an infection by establishing a position that opened a wound, allowing for viruses to enter into the museum. The viruses were both essentially people and ideas, but in the form of artworks. It seemed to me that the greatest degree of efficacy that I could achieve would be to subvert the institution itself, to use preexisting infrastructure, which, in the case of this work, was the Whitney admission tags that the museum uses everyday. So if the curators allowed artists to intervene in the museum, my intervention was to intervene into their intervention. So it was a double entendre in terms of how one moves structurally.

I used the exact same tags and replaced the museum initials with a small phrase: “I can’t imagine ever wanting to be white.” Each tag had a portion of the phrase on it, and the idea itself, as Juli suggested, became viral—not only because the piece was activated by visitors to the museum, who in turn became the actual work of art as participants in a performance, but also because you would see people wearing the tags all over Manhattan, and you would find them on the street, blocks and blocks away. Like a virus, it completely changed the identity of the museum by calling into question a very constructed notion of identity through an interrogation of ethnic specificity. So what is whiteness? We don’t know. White is a construction. There is no such thing as white.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Museum Tags: Second Movement (overture); or, Overture con claque (Overture with Hired Audience Members), 1993. Paint and enamel on metal. From 1993 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Image courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Museum Tags: Second Movement (overture); or, Overture con claque (Overture with Hired Audience Members), 1993. Paint and enamel on metal. From 1993 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Image courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

MS: We know what it’s not.

DJM: That’s a very good point. We know what white is not, right? And so, by calling attention to it, we get to challenge the premise of these positions that are culturally held by our institutions. Why would a museum only exhibit and have white artists? What does that mean and how do we start to think about that? Almost 30 years later, the museum will still claim that the work changed its identity, that the ’93 Biennial, and the tags themselves, became a new aspiration. It understood that it could no longer operate its organization on the same premises it had previously—the kind of cultural hierarchies that we had inherited—and that it had to be challenged and changed in order to be actually reflective of the artists that were making work in this country. It seems to me that the result of that virus was a mutation, which the museum needed in order to recognize what it was previously unable to see.

The mutation’s result was a new form of consciousness in the museum. I’m not suggesting that the museum was overtly opposed to trying to include all the different kinds of artists in this country, but at that point they did not have the self-consciousness to realize they were not fulfilling their mandate. Behavior needed to change in order for the museum to be more reflective of who exists in this country. And it did change with this exhibition and with this work of art because they called attention to the fact that a discourse was being removed, eliminated, stripped of value or any kind of representation. The piece simultaneously triggered two types of responses; the positive one came from minority artists who immediately understood the multiplicity of the work’s meaning and its proposal to complicate the subjects of race and power. On the other hand, the negative, venomous response came from white people and hundreds of articles that called me racist. For a very long time, I was basically publicly lynched, crucified, tarred and feathered because of the audacity of an artwork that dared to declare its conceptual and intellectual independence, based on linguistic predecessors, performance parameters, and the history of art that it drew upon. It wasn’t just some random provocative statement that was thrown out, it was actually rooted in the very essence of philosophy and art history. It was not and did not pretend to be passive.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, If Only God Had Invented Coca Cola, Sooner! Or, The Death of My Pet Monkey, 2004. Portfolio of twenty-two screen prints with letterpress, 27.9375 x 21.9375” (71.0 x 55.7 cm). Edition of 5, 1 AP. Image courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

MS: Do you think part of the issue was that you enlisted viewers? The title of the piece is Overture with Hired Audience Members. You’re enlisting the audience, not as spectators, but as agents to smuggle these ideas outside of the museum. Whereas if you had just done a painting, it probably wouldn’t have been as incendiary, right?

DJM: No, of course not. The work is an indictment, including of myself. So my position, culturally speaking, is not as if I’m standing on a hierarchy looking down, suggesting that I myself am not involved in the same critique. I’m critiquing myself as much as I am critiquing anyone else. Not only did the tags unleash a virus into the museum hierarchy itself, but they also moved like a firestorm in culture.

MS: I want to speak about cyborgs, androids, and doppelgängers in your work. Once they become sentient and deviate from the order that’s been prescribed to them, they become illicit beings. In her essay on your work, Rachel Leah Baum notes that you are “counterfeiting the self-contained body of the artist.”[1] Counterfeiting is the flipside of smuggling, right? Instead of covertly transporting something real or something legitimate, you introduce something fake.

DJM: I grew up here in LA and when I was a little boy it was a big treat to go to Disneyland. I have two stories about Disneyland that lead into this trajectory.

The first one was going to Disneyland and seeing Abraham Lincoln. I was six or seven years old and I couldn’t figure it out. Abraham Lincoln was on display, sitting in a chair, and he stands up, takes off his hat and recites the Gettysburg Address. I was truly astonished: “How can Abraham Lincoln be alive?” A question that my dad answered with, “It’s a machine.” I just thought this was the most extraordinary thing I’d ever seen. It was unbelievable to see a machine acting as a person in front of you. What does that mean? What does it mean to re-animate life?

When I was eight years old I went back to Disneyland. They have the light parade at night and from the top of the Matterhorn, Tinkerbell would appear and fly down to the ground. This was a woman in costume with wings, a trapeze artist who would float down on a wire. An extraordinary illusion! So I’m there and she’s flying down, and boom, the cable breaks. She just smacked on the concrete right in front of me while my parents are trying to cover my eyes. Tinkerbell died in front of me when I was eight years old.

The juxtaposition between these two experiences for me was really profound in trying to understand what was real, to rethink normative notions of reality and representations of that reality. Later, when I became clear about these experiences, it made perfect sense to me, especially with Ridley Scott’s suggestions that such things as replicas, androids, or machines could exist. That was the beginning of my own exploration into creating doppelgängers of myself that were based on historic or literary figures.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, A Story for Tomorrow in 4 Chapters, Dostoevsky Loved the Hunchback of Notre Dame, Muhammad Ali and Dandelions, Lick my hunch!, 2010-2012. Archival pigment print with UV finishing coating, 74 x 60 in (188.0 x 152.4 cm). Edition of 3 (2 AP). Image courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

One of the very first ones was based on the life of Yukio Mishima, a very important author for me and probably one of the greatest writers of Japan in the last 300 years of Japanese literature. At 40 years old, this guy decides he’s done. He felt his notion of patriotism and Japanese identity was in jeopardy, so he created his own small paramilitary group, an idea he couldn’t sell. He then performed the ritual of seppuku, committing suicide at 45. There’s something epic about Mishima. With the work To Make a Blind Man Murder for the Things He’s Seen (Happiness is Over-rated) (2012), I created a doppelgänger of myself that sat in a completely white room. The room looked like something out of science fiction, which I had grown up with my whole life. The figure dressed all in blue is attempting to cut his own wrists, but he’s unable to go through with the suicide because it goes against his own programming.

Disneyland spent like a whopping million dollars on producing the Lincoln robot, probably like 10 or 15 million dollars today. My challenge was to do a poor man’s version of animatronics with scotch tape, glue, and string. I didn’t have money or access to advanced technology, so I had to learn myself and find some people with expertise to cobble it together. The outcome is a kind of dysfunctional machine, which is never going to completely work correctly. The dysfunction of the machine’s technology led me to the dysfunction of the programming itself. In my piece, there was a more abject notion of my own body. The recognition of my own dysfunction or of my own systemic diseases is coupled with the social recognition of the diseases that affect the greater society at large, which are the themes played out in Blade Runner, for example. The same themes I experienced when I was very young are coupled with my political understanding and my upbringing.

In 2006, I represented the United States in the Cairo Biennial with a sculptural installation titled Call Me Ishmael, The Fully Enlightened Earth Radiates Disaster Triumphant. I placed an animatronic doppelgänger of myself on the floor, which is having an epileptic fit. By the end of the exhibition, the machine has pounded on the ground so hard that it destroys itself. By the end of the exhibition, the machine had pounded on the ground so hard that it destroyed itself. It was a very complex choreographed narrative achieved by hijacking a sophisticated music program and applying it to the physical movements of the body.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, To Make a Blind Man Murder for the Thing’s He’s Seen (Happiness is Over- rated), 2002. Silicon over fiberglass skeleton, animated using computer-controlled pneumatics, digital audio with self-contained sound system. Overall dimensions variable; figure: 39 x 21 x 24 in (99.1 x 53.3 x 61 cm). Image courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

In Cairo, people told me they thought that it was a scene of the transition of a mortal on earth to heaven. They would pray around this thing. Extraordinary cultural things happened. Somebody “murdered” me. They jumped on my doppelgänger’s chest, put their thumbs into my eyes and gouged them out, cracked my neck, and tried to rip my head off and crush my rib cage. Cairo at that point was very volatile. Nonetheless, they called me on the phone and asked me to go and fix it so that it could live again. While some people were in awe of it, there were obviously people who felt it was blasphemous, which is why he was murdered.

Narratives are wrapped into the work itself. The layers of meaning do not have to make themselves readily available to any one viewer at any one moment. There’s the art itself and then there’s the experience of the art: the contemplation of the meaning of the work, its relationship to your own life and to other works of art. There’s also a relationship to its cultural specificity depending on where it is produced and where it is exhibited.

All of a sudden these layers mean something, so the title triggers one reading, and the works triggers a different interpretation. These can operate separately or they can operate in tandem to create more meaning. If one wants to think about Ishmael outside of Moby Dick, for example, why did Herman Melville use names from the Middle East in a story about a critique of US American imperialism? How does Ishmael, a Middle Eastern name, arrive as the main character in Moby Dick’s story?

There are all kinds of theories about this, but essentially Melville predicted the war in the Middle East. He carried the story of US American imperialism way ahead of his time, the same way someone like Jules Verne who, at the turn of the last century, predicted everything before it ever existed: going to space, traveling around the moon, going to the center of the earth, under water exploration. All these examples are narratives embedded inside of each other. The critique is never the critique on the front end. The subversion is the smuggling of ideas. It is reflective like a hall of mirrors. You show somebody one thing and you act in a different way. You counterfeit the idea. The doppelganger (the clone) is a counterfeit. It’s the unreal and the uncanny. It is abject by its very nature. It’s a machine that has been cobbled together not unlike Frankenstein who was put together with a bad brain.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Self Portrait #9d: Fifth attempt to clone mental disorder; or, How one philosophizes with a hammer, (Nietzsche) after Gustave Moreau, “Prometheus,” 1868, and David Cronenberg, “Videodrome,” 1981, 2004. From the series Coyote: I like Mexico and Mexico Likes Me (More Human Than Human), 1999–2002. 8 x 10 transparency to Digital print 60 x 48” (152.4 x 121.92 cm). Image courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

MS: Which is the ultimate act of smuggling: grave robbing.

DJM: That’s right. On the machine level you do the same thing. You grab the parts that you can and you make the best machine out of it, a counterfeit of a human being. The question then is, how does that representation challenge other representations of human beings? Why are we legitimate and other forms of life are not? The notion that human beings are the most sophisticated being in the galaxy is really absurd. It borders on lunacy. But the question remains what does it mean to be human in the twenty-first century?

MS: The thing is, whoever is telling the story legitimizes it. When the singularity happens, and we get taken over by robots, we’ll be a footnote.

DJM: Absolutely. All these representations: Blade Runner, TerminatorThe Matrix are perfect examples. And then you get to Kurzweil and the singularity: the moment a machine has sentience and we’re obsolete. So we either figure out biomechanical collaborations, or we will just become obsolete. They will no longer need a biological organism in their world. This challenges the notion of the supremacy of the human being and it points out very clearly and articulately all of our weaknesses. Think about it, we are barely out of caves, so the critique is then the critique of the species.

In Kill Bill Vol. 1, there’s a moment when David Carradine is talking to Uma Thurman about the mythology of comic books, about what superheroes are. All the different superheroes have to put on costumes in order to gain their superpowers. They are not actually superheroes. But Superman came from another planet. He came here as a baby and he disguises himself as Clark Kent in order to fit in, to disguise his superpowers. Superman’s image of the human species is Clark Kent: dumb, shy, uncoordinated, kind of a fumbling buffoon. His critique of the human race is Clark Kent. That critique is embedded in all of what we’re talking about, embedded in Ishmael, embodied in my Mishima. In all the works there is an analysis and a critique of who we are as a species. Through this analysis I’m able to get to the subtext of all the other issues that we seem to be occupied by: slavery, war and racism, the dissemination of hegemonic power, and all the tropes of a progressive society. The critique lies there.

Notes:
1. Rachel Leah Baum, “Daniel Joseph Martinez and the White Wall/Black Hole System,” in Daniel Joseph Martinez: A Life of Disobedience (Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2009), 224.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Call Me Ishmael: The Fully Enlightened Earth Radiates Disaster Triumphant, 2006. Escultura animatrónica, dimensiones variables. Instalación en el Pabellón de Estados Unidos, Décima Bienal Internacional del Cairo, Museo de Arte Moderno, Cairo, 2006. Imagen cortesía del artista y Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

Somos perros enamorados de nuestro propio vómito: contrabandear en la cotidianidad

Daniel Joseph Martinez no tiene estilo. O mejor dicho no tiene un estilo distintivo. Sería poco probable que un espectador entrara en una galería o museo y proclamara al ver por primera vez una obra suya: “esto es un Daniel Joseph Martinez” – como podría pasar con un Rothko, un Warhol, o un Judd – basado únicamente en su semejanza con otras de sus obras. El hilo común a lo largo de su obra no es estético, sino conceptual. Sus obras están unificadas no por su apariencia, sino por lo que hacen, y lo que hacen es provocar. Desafía a los espectadores no sólo a desenredar su compleja red de referencias literarias, artísticas e históricas, sino también a considerar su propia relación con las obras, las instituciones artísticas en las que están ubicadas, así como la cultura en general en la que están enmarcadas. Con este fin, emplea una amplia gama de medios y procesos, desde la fotografía hasta el trabajo basado en textos, construcciones arquitectónicas hasta robots animatrónicos. La ciencia ficción popular, Nietzsche, Martha Stewart, Herman Melville, el minimalismo reduccionista y el Partido Pantera Negra se encuentran entre la amplia gama de referentes culturales que muestra, a menudo en el mismo trabajo.

Nuestra discusión evitó las connotaciones literales del contrabando –que en los Ángeles a menudo se refieren a la frontera entre México y Estados Unidos– y en su lugar se centró en las maneras en que su trabajo, en todas sus formas, trafica en ideas y temas que subvierten las narrativas hegemónicas, a menudo apuntando a las mismas instituciones que hacen posible su trabajo. La siguiente conversación ha sido editada por longitud y claridad.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Call Me Ishmael: The Fully Enlightened Earth Radiates Disaster Triumphant, 2006. Escultura animatrónica, dimensiones variables. Instalación en el Pabellón de Estados Unidos, Décima Bienal Internacional del Cairo, Museo de Arte Moderno, Cairo, 2006. Imagen cortesía del artista y Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

Matthew Stromberg: Evidentemente estamos hablando de contrabando. Existe una interpretación literal la cual es el movimiento ilícito de mercancías, gente y drogas a través de las fronteras. Pero también hay una noción más abstracta de contrabando, que es el movimiento de ideas, o de alguna forma la subversión de estructuras hegemónicas. Después de leer el ensayo “A Scaffolding of Viral Signifiers” de Juli Carson, en el que observa que tu “corpus es menos humanoide que viral –un ‘organismo’ a cuyo ‘interior’ innato le es dado vida duradera por un agente ‘externo’–”, en lo primero que pensé fue en tus placas de identificación de la Bienal de Whitney de 1993. ¿Cómo es que dichas placas funcionan como un virus o de cierta manera como un elemento subversivo?

Daniel Joseph Martinez: Estábamos en el apogeo de las guerras culturales en 1993. Hubo una especie de euforia aumentada que, cuando llegaron los años 90, nosotros –es decir, el tipo de personas que estaban a la vanguardia de la producción cultural– reconocimos que había un asalto total que se estaba llevando a cabo en este país, y lo único que se podía hacer era resistir. No sólo se resistía como una postura defensiva, sino que también se resistía de una manera ofensiva. Había una sensación de que realmente estábamos ganando la guerra, lo cual debes imaginar que era extraordinario.

Gracias a Thelma Golden y a Elisabeth Sussman, quienes introdujeron a la Bienal una plataforma multi-discursiva que fue inclusiva en todas las formas posibles, la exhibición fue un verdadero retrato de los constituyentes de artistas en los Estados Unidos. Por primera vez en toda su historia la Bienal era abrumadoramente plural.

En cierto sentido, establecieron la posibilidad de una infección al instaurar una posición que abría una herida, permitiendo que los virus entraran al museo. Los virus eran esencialmente gente e ideas pero en forma de obras de arte. Me pareció que el mayor grado de eficacia que podía lograr sería subvertir la propia institución, utilizar infraestructura preexistente, que en el caso de esta obra, eran las placas de identificación del Whitney que el museo usa diariamente. Así que si las curadoras permitieron a los artistas intervenir en el museo, mi intervención era intervenir en su intervención. Fue un doble sentido en términos de cómo uno se mueve estructuralmente.

Usé exactamente las mismas placas y reemplacé las iniciales del museo por una frase corta: I can’t imagine ever wanting to be white (No puedo imaginar alguna vez haber querido ser blanco). Cada placa tenía una porción de la frase, y la idea misma, como Juli sugirió, se hizo viral –no sólo porque la obra fue activada por los visitantes del museo, quienes a su vez se convirtieron en las obras de arte como participantes de un performance, sino también porque verías gente usando las placas en todo Manhattan y las encontrarías en la calle, por cuadras y cuadras. Como un virus, la obra cambió completamente la identidad del museo al cuestionar una noción muy construida de identidad a través de una interrogación de especificidad étnica. ¿Qué es entonces la blancura racial? No lo sabemos. El blanco es una construcción. No hay tal cosa como lo blanco.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Museum Tags: Second Movement (overture) / Overture con claque (Overture with Hired Audience Members), 1993. Pintura y esmalte sobre metal. De la Bienal de Whitney de 1993, Whitney Museum of American Art, Nueva York. Imagen cortesía del artista y Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Museum Tags: Second Movement (overture) / Overture con claque (Overture with Hired Audience Members), 1993. Pintura y esmalte sobre metal. De la Bienal de Whitney de 1993, Whitney Museum of American Art, Nueva York. Imagen cortesía del artista y Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

MS: Sabemos lo que no es.

DJM: Ese un buen punto. Sabemos lo que no es blanco, ¿cierto? Y así, al llamar la atención sobre ello, podemos llegar a cuestionar la premisa de estas posiciones que son culturalmente mantenidas por nuestras instituciones. ¿Por qué un museo solo exhibe y tiene artistas blancos? ¿Qué significa esto y cómo empezamos a pensar sobre ello? Casi 30 años después, el museo todavía sostiene que la obra cambió su identidad, que la Bienal del 93, y las placas mismas, se convirtieron en una nueva aspiración. Entendió que ya no podía operar su organización sobre las mismas premisas que tenía antes –el tipo de jerarquías culturales que nosotros hemos heredado–, y que tenía que desafiar y cambiar para ser realmente reflexivo acerca de los artistas que estaban haciendo obra en este país. Me parece que el resultado de ese virus fue una mutación, misma que el museo necesitaba para poder reconocer lo que antes era incapaz de ver.

El resultado de la mutación fue una nueva forma de conciencia en el museo. No estoy sugiriendo que estaba abiertamente opuesto a intentar incluir a todos los diferentes tipos de artistas en este país, pero en ese momento no tenían la auto-conciencia para darse cuenta de que no estaba cumpliendo con su mandato. Tuvo que cambiar el comportamiento a fin de que el museo fuera más reflexivo acerca de quién existe en este país. Y cambió con esta exhibición y esta obra de arte porque llamaron la atención al hecho de que un discurso esta siendo removido, eliminado, despojado de su valor o cualquier tipo de representación. La obra simultáneamente generó dos tipos de respuestas; la positiva vino de artistas minoritarios que comprendían la multiplicidad del significado de la obra y su propuesta por complicar los temas de raza y poder. Por otro lado, la respuesta negativa y venenosa vino de gente blanca y cientos de artículos que me llamaban racista. Durante mucho tiempo, básicamente fui públicamente linchado, crucificado, alquitranado y emplumado por la audacia de una obra que se atrevió a declarar su independencia conceptual e intelectual basada en predecesores lingüísticos, parámetros performáticos y la historia del arte en la que se basó. No era solamente una aleatoria declaración que fue arrojada, de hecho estaba arraigada en la esencia misma de la filosofía y la historia del arte. No fue ni pretendía ser pasiva.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, If Only God Had Invented Coca Cola, Sooner! Or, The Death of My Pet Monkey, 2004. Portfolio de veintidós serigrafías con rotulación, 27.9375 x 21.9375” (71.0 x 55.7 cm). Edición de 5, 1 AP. Imagen cortesía del artista y Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

MS: ¿Piensas que parte del problema fue que empleaste a la audiencia? El título de la obra es Overture with Hired Audience Members [Obertura con miembros de una audiencia contratada]. Empleas a la audiencia, no como espectadores, sino como agentes para contrabandear estas ideas fuera del museo. En cambio, si hubieras hecho una pintura, probablemente no hubiera sido tan incendiaria, ¿cierto?

DJM: No, claro que no. La obra es una acusación, incluyéndome a mí mismo. Así que mi posición, culturalmente hablando, no es como si estuviera en una jerarquía mirando hacia abajo, sugiriendo que yo mismo no estoy involucrado en la misma crítica. Las placas no solo desataron un virus en la jerarquía del museo, sino que también se movieron como una tormenta en la cultura.

MS: Quiero hablar sobre cyborgs, androides y doppelgängers en tu trabajo. Una vez que se vuelven sensibles y se desvían del orden que ha sido prescrito en ellos, se convierten en seres ilícitos. En su ensayo sobre tu trabajo, Rachel Leah Baum observa que estas “falsificando el cuerpo autónomo del artista”.[1] Falsificar es el otro lado del contrabando, ¿cierto? En lugar de transportar de forma encubierta algo real o algo ilegítimo, introduces algo falso.

DJM: Crecí aquí en LA y cuando era un niño pequeño era un gran premio ir a Disneylandia. Tengo dos historias sobre Disneylandia que llevan a esta trayectoria.

La primera es ir a Disneylandia y ver a Abraham Lincoln. Tenía como seis o siete años y no podía entenderlo. Abraham Lincoln estaba en exhibición, sentado en una silla, y se paraba, se quitaba el sombrero y recitaba el discurso de Gettysburg. Estaba verdaderamente sorprendido: ¿Cómo era posible que Abraham Lincoln estuviera vivo? Una pregunta que mi padre contestó con: “Es un robot”. Solo pensé que esta era la cosa más extraordinaria que yo había visto jamás. Era increíble ver a una máquina actuar como una persona frente a ti. ¿Qué significaba eso? ¿Qué significaba reanimar la vida?

Cuando tenía ocho años regresé a Disneylandia. Tenían el desfile de luces en la noche y de la cima del Matterhorn, Campanita aparecería y volaría hasta el suelo. Era una mujer en un disfraz con alas, una artista del trapecio que flotaría abajo por un cable. ¡Una ilusión extraordinaria! Así que estoy ahí y ella esta volando hacia abajo, y boom, el cable se rompe. Ella se estrella en el concreto justo frente a mí mientras mis padres tratan de cubrir mis ojos. Campanita murió frente a mí cuando tenía ocho años.

Para mí la yuxtaposición de estas dos experiencias fue realmente profunda en cuanto a intentar entender lo que era real, repensar las nociones normativas de la realidad y las representaciones de esa misma. Posteriormente, cuando comprendí estas experiencias, me hizo perfecto sentido, especialmente con las sugerencias de Ridley Scott de que las cosas tales como réplicas, androides o máquinas podían existir. Ese fue el comienzo de mi propia exploración en la creación de doppelgängers de mí mismo que se basan en figuras históricas o literarias.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, A Story for Tomorrow in 4 Chapters, Dostoevsky Loved the Hunchback of Notre Dame, Muhammad Ali and Dandelions, Lick my hunch!, 2010-2012. Impresión con pigmento perdurable con capa de acabado UV, 74 x 60 in (188.0 x 152.4 cm). Edición de 3 (2 AP). Imagen cortesía del artista y Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

Uno de los primeros estaba basado en la vida de Yukio Mishima, un muy importante autor para mí y probablemente uno de los grandes escritores de Japón en los últimos 300 años de literatura japonesa. A sus 40 años, este tipo decide que él ya ha hecho todo. Sentía que su noción de patriotismo y de identidad japonesa estaba en juego, por lo que creó su propio grupo paramilitar, una idea que no pudo vender. Entonces realizó el ritual de seppuku, cometiendo suicidio a los 45 años. Hay algo épico sobre Mishima. Con la obra To Make a Blind Man Murder for the Things He’s Seen (Happiness is Over-rated) (2012), creé un doppelgänger de mí mismo que estaba sentado en una habitación completamente blanca. La habitación parecía algo salido de la ciencia ficción, con la que había crecido toda mi vida. La figura vestida toda de azul esta intentando cortar sus propias muñecas, pero no le es posible llevar a cabo el suicidio porque va en contra de
su propia programación.

Disneylandia gastó como un millón de dólares en producir el robot Lincoln, probablemente como 10 o 15 millones de dólares actuales. Mi reto fue hacer una versión pobre de un animatrónico con cinta scotch, pegamento e hilo. No tenía dinero o acceso a tecnología avanzada, por lo que tuve que aprender por mí mismo y encontrar algunas personas con experiencia para improvisarlo juntos. El resultado es una especie de máquina disfuncional, la cual nunca podrá trabajar correctamente por completo. La disfuncionalidad tecnológica de la máquina me llevó a la disfuncionalidad de la programación misma. En mi pieza, había una noción más abyecta de mi propio cuerpo. El reconocimiento de mi propia disfunción o de mis propias enfermedades sistémicas se suma al reconocimiento social de las enfermedades que afectan a la sociedad en general, que son los temas que se juegan en Blade Runner, por ejemplo. Los mismos temas que experimenté cuado era muy joven se conectan con mi comprensión política y mi educación.

En 2006, representé a Estados Unidos en la Bienal del Cairo con una instalación escultórica titulada Call Me Ishmael, The Fully Enlightened Earth Radiates Disaster Triumphant. En el suelo coloqué un doppelgänger animatrónico de mí mismo vestido de blanco, el cual, tenía ataques epilépticos. Al final de la exhibición, la máquina había golpeado en el suelo tan fuerte que se destruyó a sí misma. Fue una muy compleja narrativa coreografiada lograda al secuestrar un sofisticado programa musical y aplicarlo a los movimientos físicos del cuerpo.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, To Make a Blind Man Murder for the Thing’s He’s Seen (Happiness is Over- rated), 2002. Silicón sobre esqueleto de fibra de vidrio, animado con neumáticos controlados por computadora, audio digital con sistema de sonido independiente. En general, dimensiones variables, figura: 39 x 21 x 24 in (99.1 x 53.3 x 61 cm). Imagen cortesía del artista y Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

En el Cairo, la gente me dijo que pensaban que era una escena de la transición de un mortal en la tierra al cielo. Rezarían alrededor de esta cosa. Ocurrieron cosas culturales extraordinarias. Alguien me “asesinó”. Saltaron sobre el pecho de mi doppelgänger, pusieron sus pulgares en mis ojos y los arrancaron, me rompieron el cuello y trataron de arrancarme la cabeza y aplastar mis costillas. En ese momento el Cairo era muy volátil. Sin embargo, me llamaron por teléfono y me pidieron que lo arreglara para que pudiera vivir de nuevo. Si bien algunas personas se maravillaban de él, obviamente había gente que sentía que era blasfemo, razón por la que fue asesinado.

Las narrativas se envuelven en el trabajo mismo. Las capas de significado no tienen que estar fácilmente disponibles para cualquier espectador en cualquier momento. Está el arte en sí y luego está la experiencia del arte: la contemplación del significado de la obra, su relación con tu propia vida y con otras obras de arte. También hay una relación con su especificidad cultural dependiendo de dónde se produce y dónde se exhibe.

De repente estas capas significan algo, por lo que el título desencadena una lectura y las obras desencadenan una interpretación diferente. Estos pueden funcionar por separado o pueden operar en conjunto para crear más significado. Por ejemplo, si uno quiere pensar en Ishmael fuera de Moby Dick, ¿por qué Herman Melville usa nombres del Medio Oriente en una historia sobre una crítica al imperialismo estadounidense? ¿Cómo llega Ishmael, un nombre del Medio Oriente, a ser el personaje principal de la historia de Moby Dick?

Existen todo tipo de teorías sobre esto, pero esencialmente Melville predijo la guerra en el Medio Oriente. Llevó la historia del imperialismo estadounidense más allá de su tiempo, de la misma manera en que Julio Verne, a principios del siglo pasado, predijo todo antes de que existiera: ir al espacio, viajar alrededor de la luna, ir al centro de la Tierra y la exploración submarina. Todos estos ejemplos son narraciones incorporadas dentro de cada una de las demás. La crítica no es nunca la crítica en el extremo delantero. La subversión es el contrabando de ideas. Es reflejante como un pasillo de espejos. Le muestras a alguien una cosa y actúas de forma diferente. Falsificaste la idea. El doppelgänger (el clon) es una falsificación. Es lo irreal y lo extraño. Es abyecto por su propia naturaleza. Es una máquina que ha sido improvisada al contrario de Frankenstein quien fue creado con un mal cerebro.

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Self Portrait #9d: Fifth attempt to clone mental disorder; or, How one philosophizes with a hammer, (Nietzsche) after Gustave Moreau, “Prometheus,” 1868, and David Cronenberg, “Videodrome,” 1981, 2004. De la serie: Coyote: I like Mexico and Mexico Likes Me (More Human Than Human), 1999–2002. 8 x 10 transparencia a impresión digital 60 x 48” (152.4 x 121.92 cm). Imagen cortesía del artista y Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles, California.

MS: Quien es el acto definitivo de contrabando: el saqueo de tumbas.

DJM: Así es. Haces lo mismo en el nivel de la máquina. Agarras las partes que puedas y de ello haces la mejor máquina posible, una falsificación de un ser humano. La pregunta entonces es: ¿cómo esa representación desafía a otras representaciones de los seres humanos? ¿por qué somos legítimos y otras formas de vida no lo son? La noción de que los seres humanos son el ser más sofisticado en la galaxia es realmente absurda. Se acerca a la locura. Pero la pregunta sigue siendo ¿qué significa ser humano en el siglo XXI?

MS: El asunto es, quien sea que este contando la historia la legitima. Cuando la singularidad pase y seamos sustituidos por los robots, seremos la nota al pie.

DJM: Absolutamente. Todas estas representaciones: Blade RunnerTerminator, The Matrix son ejemplos perfectos. Y luego llegas a Kurzweil y la singularidad: el momento en que una máquina se concientiza y nosotros somos obsoletos. Así que, o desciframos las colaboraciones biomecánicas, o simplemente nos volveremos obsoletos. [Los robots] ya no necesitarán un organismo biológico en su mundo. Esto desafía la noción de la supremacía del ser humano y señala con mucha claridad y articulación todas nuestras debilidades. Piénsalo, apenas salimos de las cuevas, así que la crítica es entonces la crítica de la especie.

En Kill Bill Vol. 1, hay un momento en que David Carradine está hablando con Uma Thurman sobre la mitología de los libros de historietas, sobre lo que son los superhéroes. Todos los diferentes superhéroes tienen que ponerse disfraces con el fin de ganar sus superpoderes. En realidad no son superhéroes. Pero Superman vino de otro planeta. Vino aquí cuando era un bebé y se disfrazó de Clark Kent para encajar, para disfrazar sus superpoderes. La imagen de Superman de la especie humana es Clark Kent: tonto, tímido, descoordinado, un tipo de bufón torpe. Su crítica a la raza humana es Clark Kent. Esa crítica está incrustada en todo lo que estamos hablando, incrustado en Ishmael, encarnado en mi Mishima. En todas las obras hay un análisis y una crítica de quiénes somos como especie. A través de este análisis soy capaz de llegar al subtexto de todos los otros temas que parecen ocuparnos: la esclavitud, la guerra y el racismo, la diseminación del poder hegemónico, y todos los tropos de una sociedad progresista. La crítica yace ahí.

Notas:
1. Rachel Leah Baum, “Daniel Joseph Martinez and the White Wall/Black Hole System,” en Daniel Joseph Martinez: A Life of Disobedience (Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2009), 224.

Tags: , , , , , ,

National Symbol

Caramel Huysmans

Concentrations 60

The Resemblance Is All in the Eye of the Beholder