Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Cuerpos celestes: Laura Huertas Millán on Patricio Guzmán

By Laura Huertas Millán

Laura Huertas Millán examines Chilean filmmaker Patricio Guzmán’s enquiry into the inscription of political history in nature within his recent film productions.

Laura Huertas Millán reflexiona sobre la investigación de la inscripción de la historia política en la naturaleza en la obra reciente del cineasta chileno Patricio Guzmán.

BDN_stills_2K_00862709

Patricio Guzmán, The Pearl Button, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution

The arid mountains of the Atacama desert fly by the window. The north of Chile, 2001. Judge Guzmán is searching for the bodies of those whom Pinochet disappeared. In the landscape’s background, three volcanoes. The film begins with a trip to a quarry that could be an archaeological site. But it isn’t any ancestors’ remains they’re looking for in this part of the desert. The judge pronounces this investigation is one step closer to social peace. Isabel Reveco, a forensic anthropologist, calls up the image of two bodies found right there, stripped naked, in 1974, with their heads turned toward the volcanoes. Two small, delicate pieces of human bone are seen in her hands. It gives me some peace of mind, says a woman seated near an excavation site. I feel their presence, I feel all this rage, I feel all this sadness. This was my son when I saw him for the last time and now I’ve seen… I’ve seen nothing. In my mind I’ve seen nothing. I’m only going to be left with the memory that I came and that maybe my son ended up here. She hides her gaze behind thick sunglasses. Filmed in close-up, on the big screen, her framed face becomes a monument. She wears a black-and-white photograph of a young man around her neck.

The first four minutes of Patricio Guzmán’s El caso Pinochet (The Pinochet Case; 2001) are so dense they could be the incipit of his three subsequent works: Salvador Allende (2004), Nostalgia de la Luz (Nostalgia for the Light; 2010) and El botón de nácar (The Pearl Button; 2015). Various motifs that move through the director’s work burn themselves onto the retina and lodge firmly in the ear: the open settings, the faces, words, the journey, investigations and pain, this last blind: I haven’t seen anything, the mother says. The 11 September 1973 coup lies at the heart of all three works. The history behind that era’s dictatorship in Chile, and its consequences, come back relentlessly, perhaps because they are the origin of his cinema; Guzmán’s first motion picture dealt with the first year of leftist Salvador Allende’s presidency. Chris Marker, who happened to be passing through Santiago, had seen it and later had provided him with a pair of film reels to get him started on a new project. Shooting that second picture reached a high point on the very day of the military coup. Guzmán was held prisoner for fifteen days in Santiago’s Estadio Nacional. He managed to be released, get his hands back on the filmed footage and get out of Chile. La batalla de Chile (The Battle of Chile) —a trilogy released between 1975 and 1979 and which sealed the director’s fate as a permanent exile— came out of those rushes.

BDN_stills_2K_00862685

Patricio Guzmán, The Pearl Button, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution.

Salvador Allende marked my entire life. I would not be who I am today if he had not embodied that utopia of a more just, freer world that circulated in the Chile of that time. I was there as an actor and a filmmaker. So says the director in voice-over, in the eponymous film about the man who changed Chile and who ended his life cornered by his own nation’s military brass in the Palacio de la Moneda, Chile’s executive mansion. The conservative forces that organized the coup wanted to exterminate a fledgling system that proposed a new social and political vision, Marxist in spirit, that aspired to national autonomy and to defending the values of the left. The dictatorship’s victims were largely from the filmmaker’s own generation —people who at that point were barely adults. They were literally attacked and genocide was not enough; rendering invisible, torturing and murdering these bodies was, among so many other semantic horrors contained within such gestures, a message in abstentia but nonetheless clearly directed at the Chilean nation and the world, in the context of the Cold War at its height. The coup and subsequent state-sponsored terrorism were attacks on youth as a symbol, as representation and as ontology. Jóvenes de diecicocho años —eighteen-year-olds—, says a man in the first scene of The Pinochet Case, referring to the bodies they’re looking for in the desert.

It’s not a history you forget. Thirty-one years later, in his film Salvador Allende, Patricio Guzmán asserts, The past does not pass. It reverberates… The famed Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño —also from Guzmán’s generation and also detained for several days and exiled after the coup— declares in his Caracas speech (1999) that “to a great extent everything that I have ever written is a love letter or a letter of farewell to my own generation, those of us who were born in the ’50s and who chose at a given moment to take up arms (though in this case it would be more correct to say “militancy”) and gave the little that we had, or the greater thing that we had, which was our youth, to a cause that we believed to be the most generous of the world’s causes and that was, in a sense, though in truth it wasn’t. (…) All of Latin America is sown with the bones of these forgotten youths.” Both Bolaño and Chris Marker (above all in his film Le Fond de l’air est rouge, from 1977) never ceased (self-)analyzing, and harshly, what a militant, leftist youth implied. Patricio Guzmán’s cinema does not concentrate on that process quite so much, but it is clearly anchored in a process of mourning this original trauma that catapulted him into cinema; anchored in a process of victim recognition and in resistance on the part of families —in particular the mothers his filmmaking honors time and again. It is cinema obsessed with memory, with reparation and with writing history, which could be a “love letter or letter of farewell to a generation” as well.

The word generation comes from the Latin generatio, derived from genus, whose first definition is “origin, extraction or birth.” It contains a dual semantic movement, designating a collective, a group of people born within the same time swath, at the same time it evokes a genesis. In work completed since 2006, the year Chilean military dictator Augusto Pinochet died, a new narrative device emerges in Guzmán’s films that lends even more meaning to that word’s dual-natured oscillation.

BDN_stills_2K_00862690

Patricio Guzmán, The Pearl Button, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution.

Nostalgia for the Light begins by portraying an enormous telescope that is being prepared for looking into the beyond, through the transparency of the Atacama desert sky. It is a place so dry it naturally mummifies corpses. The remains that lie in these lands do not decompose. There, astronomers rub elbows with historians and archaeologists, but also with a group of women that never cease moving across the territory. Thus the film links two literally and figuratively sidereal searches. On one hand there are scientists from all over the world in Atacama, in search of the echoes from the Big Bang that are still rattling around some corner of the universe. Then there are the mothers of the disappeared in search of their children’s remains, dismembered and scattered across 105 thousand square kilometers of desert. Both investigations play out on an infinite scale, like needles in a haystack, and both are linked to a notion of origin. The beginning of life itself, say the astronomers; and by extension the future of the human race, through an extraterrestrial search. The women who are looking for their loved ones’ remains, in search of the origin of their pain, the narrative that hides behind absence. And in the third place, what is looked for and what is recounted is also the origin of Patricio Guzmán’s filmmaking.

BDN_stills_2K_00862737

Patricio Guzmán, The Pearl Button, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution.

Chile was a haven of peace, far from the rest of the world. Santiago slept at the foot of the mountains, with no connection to the earth. I loved science-fiction stories, lunar eclipses and looking at the sun through a piece of smoked glass. Nostalgia for the Light evokes memories of the filmmaker’s childhood and the desire that lies inside the long-distance observation of celestial bodies, a cinematic projection that originates in stories of travels through time and space. The even more intimate origins of a cinematography. Nostalgia for a time that was still ignorant of the horrors to come, where it was still possible to imagine other worlds. Photographs of the universe taken by Stéphane Guisard, with musical accompaniment by Miranda and Tobar, create a vibrant homage to space-travel movies and establish the film’s timeframe, deeply imbued by the disquiet that lies at the borderline between life and death. It is in this film that Guzman’s cinema manages its most impressive transitions, passing from images of a galaxy in movement to an indigenous mummy, a petrified body whose empty eye-sockets look straight at the camera.

This cosmic vertigo of origin and end, from cosmos to skull, leads to thoughts of melancholic iconography. Melancholia, a Latin term derived from the Greek μελαγχολια (literally, “black bile”) is one of the four humors that, according to Hippocrates, inhabit the human body. Subjects in whom that humor predominates are (more) given to states of affliction and despondency. A cosmic sadness later characterized as the “Saturnine nature,” Durer portrays it in his 1514 engraving Melancholia I, from the Meisterstiche prints series, as a meditating and vexed winged figure. Spread all around are (among other items) geometric instruments of measure and tools for astronomical studies. Far off, a star illumines the sky and a rainbow frames a beyond that in the engraving appears unreachable and regulates the image’s entire composition. A figure that crosses all of Western culture(s)’ political borders, the iconography of melancholy associates anatomy and the heavens; the infinite with small, vulnerable human life; and humors and transformations proper to nature —entropy. The “black sun of melancholy,” i.e., the emotional eclipse Gérard Nerval enunciated in his poem El Desdichado (1854), resonates with one of Nazi mysticism’s symbols, the “black sun” formed by three swastikas. Roberto Bolaño’s work repeatedly exposes the corrosive nature of this dark iconography, for example when the infamous Ramírez Hoffman writes some dark verses across the sky in Latin with a Luftwaffe Messerschmitt aircraft (Nazi Literature in the Americas, 1996). Almost as if mocking the German Romantics —such as Novalis and Caspar David Friedrich, who see a projection space for Stimmung (i.e., “humor,” “mood”) in infinite natural extensions. If Roberto Bolaño and Patricio Guzmán strike us as two very different planets in the same galaxy, one can nonetheless note a recurrence of figures like the desert and the sky in works by both artists. Where Bolaño sinks into the obscurity of the fascist aesthetic to look at horror straight on, Guzmán goes in the opposite direction, staring insistently toward the victims’ side.

In Nostalgia for the Light, the figure of Valentina Rodríguez states astronomy has helped me lend a different dimension to the idea of pain, absence, loss. The daughter of disappeared political prisoners, she was raised by her grandparents. When pain gets really oppressive (…) To think that everything began with a cycle and that it neither began nor will it end with me, nor with my parents, nor my children; that we’re all part of a current, an energy, of matter that recycles, like stars that have to die so that other stars, other planets, can emerge; so that life can emerge… In light of that, I believe what happened to them, their absence, takes on another meaning… Valentina is far removed from any practice of romantic trope. This is not about contemplating the stars to project one’s own pain; on the contrary, it’s about understanding a sovereign otherness that includes but does not depend on us. Being able to accept a position in a world in which we are not central; or to begin to see our participation in and communication with a movement that goes beyond us. Later, the film reveals that the matter that makes up the stars is none other than calcium, just like in human bones. In a literal sense, the cosmic is the human, and vice-versa. A possible resilience appears to be rooted in the inclusion of one space within another, or in their interference.

6

Albert Durer, Melancholia I, engraving, 1514.

Territory and nation have always been centers of gravity in Patricio Guzmán’s films. Yet in Nostalgia for the Light one intuits a rootedness that goes beyond any nation’s borders: in the observatories of the Atacama Desert, the human species’s entire existence and fragility are contemplated. Now we consider an event from 1968, a notorious year for having represented the high-point of various political and aesthetic generational movements that demanded freedom, including, among others, the so-called “cine-tracts”(1) that exerted such an influence on documentary filmmaking. This additional event that concerns us here is not related to peaceful revolutions and/or those that dominant powers attack, yet their strange synchrony with dominant powers gives rise to reflection. The first publication of photographs portraying Earth from space, taken as part of the Apollo 8 mission, were in effect in 1968. The image did not portray deep divisions between nations nor between nations and natural elements. Everything was involved in a singular circular movement, a blue, united globe. It was the first time the planet had been portrayed from its exterior and it seemed small, just one other element forming part of the infinite cosmic night. Humanity could now be seen from the outside. Exterior became interior and vice-versa.

In The Pearl Button, from 2015, this circularity between natural elements and the human, between the interior and the exterior, returns. The film’s starting point is water, the element that makes up more than half the matter in our bodies. Looking at the stars, I was drawn to the importance of water. Apparently water came from outer space and life reached us on comets that later formed the oceans, the filmmaker tells us in voice-over, at the same time he shows us a piece of quartz where a drop of water more than three thousand years old has been encapsulated. This new cinematic journey takes us to the Pacific coast of Chile’s southern point, a vast archipelago with a 74,000-kilometer coastline, where a number of indigenous ethnicities live, and lived, including the Selk’nam, the Yamana and the Kawésqar. Murdered, kidnapped and reduced to slavery, these native people were the first victims of genocide and segregation in Chile. Guzmán traces out the inexorable timeline to extinction for a multi-ethnic nation that lived in constant contact with water —maritime and fishing peoples who worshipped both the sea and the stars. Photographs by Martín Gusinde, an Austrian ethnographer and priest who visited Patagonia at the beginning of the twentieth century, portray the Selk’nam in their sacred rituals, painted from head to foot with designs Guzmán compares to constellations. More than half a century later, Paz Errázuriz, a Chilean photographer, returns to Tierra Del Fuego to portray these ethnicities’ surviving individuals. No longer do we see rituals of communion with the forces of nature, but rather the pain of acculturation in faces incisively marked by time and the memory of colonialist violence.

1

Patricio Guzmán, The Pearl Button, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution.

The title The Pearl Button hearkens to Jemmy Button, a fourteen-year-old Native American the English took prisoner in the nineteenth century. The colonizers who carried him off named him like this because they could not pronounce his real name and because allegedly the price they’d paid for him had been a pearl button. Jemmy learned English and that nation’s customs, living in Europe for several years. When as an adult he returned to his native land, he could never acclimate himself to a world that had become foreign to him. It’s hard not to draw a parallel between his exile and Guzmán’s, for whom making a film in his own country means returning to a native land where he no longer lives and whose chronology carried on without him. Patricio Guzmán links Jemmy’s nickname to another small button found on a rail fished from the ocean, kept for years in a display case at Villa Grimaldi (the Chilean dictatorship’s erstwhile detention center). It was a button that allowed one of the disappeared to be identified, an outcome of the fact some 1400 political detainees’ bodies had been bound to heavy-duty rails and thrown into the ocean. What happened to those bodies? Who has taken responsibility for these deaths? The Pearl Button once again stirs up the pain of those questions, breathing new life into a story that hasn’t been taken up in fair social and political terms. Here the sea echoes the desert of the filmmaker’s previous works. Both environments are colossal graveyards. Disquieted, the filmmaker wonders how Chile, a nation that in geographic terms is literally side by side with the ocean, has managed to develop its culture, economy and above all historical memory without looking to the water.

Patricio Guzmán’s films are eminently political and this evidence cannot be denied. But with political we must not necessarily understand partisan, much less allied with any political party. His films return to the roots of the term political, (in ancient Greek, the polis was the city) by centering on the problematic surrounding the creation of community and memory in a nation fundamentally divided by violence. The inclusion of voices and natural presences marks an important moment in his films. Like the “Blue Earth” picture, his films become representations in which individual trauma (be it a person’s or a specific nation’s) should be heard by all humanity, and beyond. These are events geologically inscribed on the face of the earth. The great power of his films lies therein —including the Chilean problem in the history of humankind and nature— and in his films both elements touch and are ultimately the same thing. The two films echo current ways of thinking we consider urgent, where the distinction between the “natural” and the “cultural” is placed into crisis. While we would not go so far to say Guzmán’s films are “mutinaturalist”(2) nor that this is an artistic practice inscribed in this (these) “de-colonialist” line(s) of thought, a new poetic that skews to as much does break out in two recent artworks. Its vertigo may be even more political.

 

Notes:

(1) Militant short-subjects, in 8mm and with exceedingly short running times, realized by filmmakers such as Godard, Resnais,… completed in May and June 1968 as an outcome of leftist political dissent. Chris Marker was behind the original idea.

(2) “(…) this new condition in conceptual maps led us to suggest the term “multinaturalism” to designate one of Amerindian thinking’s signature lines of thought as it relates to modern “multi-cultural” cosmologies: while these are based on a mutual implication between nature’s unity and a multiplicity of cultures (…), the Amerindian conception on the contrary would suppose a unity of the spirit and a diversity of bodies.” Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Metafísicas caníbales, p. 20, PUF, Paris, 2009.

BDN_stills_2K_00862709

Patricio Guzmán, El Boton de nacar, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution.

Las montañas áridas del Atacama desfilan por la ventana. Norte de Chile, año 2001. El juez Guzmán busca los cuerpos de los desaparecidos de Pinochet. Al fondo del paisaje, tres volcanes. La película comienza con el viaje hacia una cantera que podría ser arqueológica. Pero no son los restos de los antepasados lo que se busca en el desierto. El juez toma la palabra: esta investigación es un paso más de cercanía hacia la paz social. Isabel Reveco, antropóloga forense, evoca la imagen de dos cuerpos encontrados allí mismo en 1974, desnudos, con la cabeza orientada hacia los volcanes. En sus manos se ven dos pequeños y delicados pedazos de huesos humanos. Me da un poco de tranquilidad, dice una mujer sentada cerca del escenario de la excavación, siento su presencia, siento mucha rabia, siento mucha pena. Éste era mi hijo cuando lo vi por última vez y ahora he visto… no he visto nada. Yo creo que no he visto nada. Sólo me va a quedar el recuerdo de que vine y que a lo mejor aquí quedó mi hijo. Su mirada está protegida por unas gruesas gafas de sol. Filmada en un plano cerrado, en la pantalla grande la presencia de su rostro marcado se vuelve monumento. Lleva colgada en su cuello la fotografía en blanco y negro de un hombre joven.

Los primeros cuatro minutos de El caso Pinochet (2001) de Patricio Guzmán son de tal densidad que podrían ser el incipit de sus tres obras siguientes: Salvador Allende (2004), Nostalgia de la Luz (2010) y El botón de nácar (2015). Durante esos cuatro minutos se inscriben en la retina y en el oído varios motivos que atraviesan su cine: los escenarios abiertos, los rostros, la palabra, el viaje, la investigación y el dolor, que es ciego: No he visto nada, dice la madre. El golpe de estado del 11 de septiembre de 1973 está en el corazón de cada uno de estos tres trabajos. La historia de la dictadura chilena y sus consecuencias vuelven incansablemente, tal vez porque son el origen mismo de su cine: la primera película de Guzmán trataba sobre el primer año del gobierno de Allende. Chris Marker, de paso por Santiago, la había visto y más tarde le había proporcionado a Guzmán un par de bobinas fílmicas para lanzarse en un nuevo trabajo. El rodaje de esta segunda película culminó el día mismo del golpe militar. Guzmán estuvo detenido en el estadio nacional por quince días. Logró ser liberado, recuperar los rollos e irse de Chile. De estos rushes surgió La batalla de Chile, trilogía estrenada entre 1975 y 1979 que selló para siempre el estado de exilio del artista.

BDN_stills_2K_00862685

Patricio Guzmán, El Boton de nacar, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution.

Salvador Allende marcó mi vida. No sería el que soy si él no hubiera encarnado aquella utopía de un mundo más justo y más libre que recorría a mi país en esos tiempos. Yo estaba allí, actor y cineasta, dice la voz del director en la película epónima sobre ese hombre que cambió la historia de Chile y que terminó su vida acorralado por los militares de su propio país en el Palacio de la Moneda. Las fuerzas conservadoras que organizaron el golpe querían exterminar un sistema apenas naciente que proponía una nueva visión social y política de corte marxista, buscando la autonomía nacional y defendiendo valores de izquierda. Las víctimas de la dictadura fueron en gran parte personas de la misma generación del cineasta, seres apenas entrando en la edad adulta. Se atentó contra ellos literalmente y el genocidio no fue suficiente. Volver invisibles, torturar y matar estos cuerpos jóvenes era también, entre otros tantos horrores semánticos contenidos en estos gestos, un mensaje in absentia pero claro hacia la nación chilena y hacia el mundo -en pleno contexto de la guerra fría. El golpe de estado y el terrorismo de estado subsecuentes fueron atentados contra la juventud como símbolo, como representación y como ontología.

No es una historia que se olvida. Patricio Guzmán dice, 31 años después, en su filme Salvador Allende: El pasado no pasa. Vibra… Roberto Bolaño, gran escritor chileno de la misma generación que Guzmán, también preso durante algunos días y exiliado después del golpe de estado, declara en su discurso de Caracas (1999): “en gran medida todo lo que he escrito es una carta de amor o de despedida a mi propia generación, los que nacimos en la década del cincuenta y los que escogimos en un momento dado el ejercicio de la milicia, en este caso sería más correcto decir la militancia, y entregamos lo poco que teníamos, lo mucho que teníamos, que era nuestra juventud, a una causa que creímos la más generosa de las causas del mundo y que en cierta forma lo era, pero que en la realidad no lo era. (…) Toda Latinoamérica está sembrada con los huesos de estos jóvenes olvidados.

Tanto Bolaño como Chris Marker (sobre todo en su película Le Fond de l´air est rouge, 1977) no cesaron de (auto)analizar duramente lo que implicaba una juventud militante y de izquierda. El cine de Patricio Guzmán no se concentró tanto en este proceso, pero sí está anclado claramente en el proceso del duelo de este trauma originario. Su cine está anclado en el proceso de reconocimiento de las víctimas, en la resistencia de las familias – en particular de las madres que su cine honra una y otra vez. Es un cine obsesionado por la memoria, por la reparación y por escribir historia. Un cine que también podría ser “una carta de amor o de despedida a (una) generación.

La palabra generación viene del latín generatio, la cual es derivada de genus, cuyo primer significado es: origen, extracción, nacimiento. Contiene un doble movimiento semántico: designa un colectivo, un grupo de personas nacido en la misma franja de tiempo y evoca también una génesis. En los trabajos realizados después del 2006, año de la muerte de Pinochet, surge en el cine de Patricio Guzmán un nuevo dispositivo narrativo que le da aún más sentido a la doble oscilación de esta palabra.

BDN_stills_2K_00862690

Patricio Guzmán, El Boton de nacar, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution.

Nostalgia de la luz comienza mostrando un enorme telescopio que se prepara a mirar el más allá a través de la transparencia del cielo del desierto de Atacama, un lugar tan seco que momifica naturalmente los cuerpos. Los vestigios que yacen en estas tierras no se descomponen. Allí, los astrónomos se codean con historiadores y arqueólogos, pero también con un grupo de mujeres que recorren incansablemente este territorio. La película vincula de esta manera dos búsquedas literal y figurativamente siderales. Por un lado, científicos venidos del mundo entero buscan los ecos del Big Bang que circulan todavía en alguna parte del universo. Por otra parte, las madres de los desaparecidos buscan los restos de sus hijos, desmembrados y esparcidos a través de 105 000 km² de aridez. Ambas investigaciones son de escala infinita, como agujas en un pajar, y ambas están vinculadas con la noción de origen. El nacimiento mismo de la vida según los astrónomos y por extensión, el futuro de la raza humana a través de la búsqueda extraterrestre. Las mujeres que buscan los restos de sus seres queridos buscan el origen de su dolor, la narrativa escondida tras la ausencia. En tercer lugar, lo que se busca y se cuenta es también el origen del cine de Patricio Guzmán.

BDN_stills_2K_00862737

Patricio Guzmán, El Boton de nacar, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution.

Chile era un remanso de paz aislado del mundo. Santiago dormía al pie de la cordillera, sin ninguna conexión con la tierra. Yo amaba los cuentos de ciencia-ficción, los eclipses de luna y mirar el sol a través de un pedazo de vidrio ahumado. En Nostalgia de la luz se evocan los recuerdos de la infancia del cineasta, el deseo contenido en aquella lejana observación de los cuerpos celestes; la proyección cinemática originada por las historias de viajes por el espacio y por el tiempo, el origen aún más íntimo de una cinematografía. Las fotografías del universo realizadas por Stéphane Guisard, acompañadas de la música de Miranda & Tobar, hacen un vibrante homenaje a las películas de viaje en el espacio y establecen el tempo de la película, profundamente atravesada por la inquietud de la tenue frontera entre la vida y la muerte. Es en esta película en donde el cine de Guzmán logra sus transiciones más impresionantes, el pasar de las imágenes de una galaxia en movimiento a una momia indígena, un cuerpo petrificado cuyas órbitas vacías miran a la cámara.

Este vértigo cósmico del origen y del fin, del cosmos a la calavera, hace pensar en la iconografía melancólica. La melancholia, término latín heredado del griego μελαγχολια (literalmente : “bilis negra”), es uno de los cuatro humores que según Hipócrates habitan el cuerpo humano. Los sujetos en los cuales predomina este humor serían (más) propensos a estados de aflicción y abatimiento. Una tristeza cósmica que más tarde se caracterizó como el “carácter saturniano”, que Durero representa en 1514 en el grabado Melancolía I de la serie de sus Estampas Maestras como una figura alada meditabunda y acongojada. Figura que atraviesa todos los bordes políticos de la(s) cultura(s) occidental(es), la iconografía melancólica asocia la anatomía y el firmamento, lo infinito y la vida humana pequeña y vulnerable, los estados de ánimo, las transformaciones propias a la naturaleza y finalmente, la entropía. El “sol negro de la melancolía”, el eclipse emocional enunciado por Gérard Nerval en su poema El Desdichado (1854) hace eco a uno de los símbolos del misticismo nazi, el sol negro, compuesto por tres esvásticas. En la obra de Roberto Bolaño se expone reiteradamente lo corrosivo de esta iconografía sombría. Por ejemplo, en La literatura nazi en América (1996), Ramírez Hoffman, el infame, escribe oscuros versos en latín en el cielo con un avión Messerschmitt de la Luftwaffe, casi a manera de mofa contra los románticos alemanes como Novalis y Caspar David Friedrich que ven en las extensiones naturales infinitas un espacio de proyección del Stimmung (estado de ánimo). Si Roberto Bolaño y Patricio Guzmán nos parecen ser dos planetas muy diferentes de una misma galaxia, se puede, sin embargo, notar la recurrencia de las figuras del desierto y la del cielo en ambas obras. Allí donde Bolaño se sumerge en la oscuridad de la estética fascista para mirar de frente el horror, Guzmán opta al contrario por mirar insistentemente hacia el lado de las víctimas.

Dice el personaje de Valentina Rodríguez en Nostalgia de la luz: la astronomía me ha ayudado a darle otra dimensión al tema del dolor, de la ausencia, de la pérdida. Hija de presos políticos desaparecidos, la joven mujer fue criada por sus abuelos. Pensar que todo comenzó en un ciclo y no comenzó y no va a terminar en mí, ni en mis padres, ni en mis hijos, que todos somos parte de una corriente, de una energía, de una materia que se recicla, como las estrellas que tienen que morir para que surjan otras estrellas, otros planetas, para que surja vida… en ese juego, yo creo que lo que les pasó a ellos, su ausencia, cobra otro sentido Valentina se encuentra lejos del tropismo romántico; no se trata de contemplar las estrellas para proyectar el dolor propio, sino al contrario, se trata de entender una alteridad soberana que nos incluye pero que no depende de nosotros. Poder aceptar una posición en el mundo en el cual no somos centrales, entrever nuestra participación y comunicación en y con un movimiento que nos excede. Más tarde, la película nos revela que la materia que conforma las estrellas no es otra más que calcio, la misma de los huesos humanos. Lo cósmico es humano y viceversa, en sentido literal. En la inclusión de un espacio en el otro, en su interferencia, parece radicar la posibilidad de una resiliencia.

6

Albert Durer, Melancholia I, engraving, 1514.

El territorio y la nación han sido siempre puntos de gravedad en el cine de Patricio Guzmán. Pero en Nostalgia de la Luz se intuye un arraigo que traspasa los límites de un país: en los observatorios del desierto de Atacama se piensa la existencia entera de la especie humana y su fragilidad. Pensamos ahora en un evento que ocurrió en el año 1968, bien conocido por haber sido el año de apogeo de varios movimientos generacionales políticos y estéticos reivindicando la libertad – entre otros los “cine-tract” (1), de gran influencia en el cine documental. Este otro evento que nos interesa no tiene que ver con estas revoluciones pacíficas y/o acribilladas por los poderes dominantes. Sin embargo, su extraña sincronía con éstos genera reflexión. Fue en efecto durante este año que se publicó la primera fotografía del globo terrestre, tomada desde el Apollo 8. En esa imagen no había separaciones abismales entre las naciones, ni entre éstas y los elementos naturales: todo participaba de un mismo movimiento circular, un globo unido y azul. Era la primera vez que se representaba nuestro planeta desde el exterior y parecía pequeño, un elemento más, parte de una infinita noche cósmica. La humanidad pudo verse desde afuera. El exterior se volvió interior y viceversa.

En El botón de nácar (2015), Guzmán regresa a esta circularidad entre los elementos naturales y lo humano, lo interior y lo exterior. El punto de partida de la película es el agua, elemento que constituye más de la mitad de la materia de nuestro cuerpo. Mirando las estrellas, me atrajo la importancia del agua. Parece que el agua vino del espacio exterior y que la vida nos llegó en los cometas que formaron los mares, nos dice la voz en off del cineasta, al tiempo que nos muestra un pedazo de cuarzo en el cual se puede ver encapsulada una gota de agua de más de 3000 años. Este nuevo viaje cinematográfico nos lleva a orillas del océano Pacífico en la punta sur chilena, un vasto archipiélago de 74.000 kms de costa, donde viven y vivieron varias etnias indígenas, entre ellas los Selk’nam, los Yamana y los Kawésqar. Asesinados, secuestrados, reducidos a la esclavitud, estos nativos fueron víctimas antes que nadie en Chile de la segregación y del genocidio. Guzmán traza la inexorable cronología hacia la extinción de una nación multiétnica que vivía en comunicación constante con el agua. Pueblos de navegantes y pescadores, adoraban tanto al océano como a las estrellas. Las fotografías de Martín Gusinde, etnógrafo y sacerdote austriaco que visitó la Patagonia a principios del siglo XX, muestran a los Selk´nam en sus rituales sagrados, pintados de los pies a la cabeza, con dibujos que Guzmán compara con constelaciones. Más de medio siglo más tarde, Paz Errázuriz, fotógrafa chilena, vuelve hacia Tierra del Fuego para retratar a los sobrevivientes de estas etnias. Ya no se ven los rituales de comunicación con las fuerzas de la naturaleza sino el dolor de la aculturación en los rostros marcados de manera incisiva por el tiempo y la memoria de la violencia colonial.

1

Patricio Guzmán, El Botón de nacar, video, 82 min., 2015 © Pyramide Distribution.

El título El botón de nácar hace eco a Jemmy Button, indígena de catorce años secuestrado en el siglo XIX en Tierra del Fuego por los ingleses. Al no poder pronunciar su verdadero nombre, los colonos que se lo llevaron lo llamaron de esta manera. Además, supuestamente el precio que habrían pagado por él habría sido ése, un botón de nácar. Jemmy aprendió la lengua y costumbres inglesas y vivió varios años en Europa. Al volver a su tierra natal a la edad adulta, nunca pudo volver a adaptarse a un mundo que ya se había vuelto para él extranjero. Resulta difícil no hacer el paralelo entre el exilio de este nativo y el del propio cineasta, para quien hacer una película en Chile es el retorno a un país natal que ya no se habita, cuya cronología prosiguió sin él. Patricio Guzmán une el apodo de Jemmy a otro pequeño botón encontrado en un riel sacado del océano, albergado por años en una vitrina de la Villa Grimaldi (antiguo centro de detención durante la dictadura). Un botón que permitió identificar a un desaparecido. En efecto, casi 1400 cuerpos de detenidos políticos fueron amarrados a pesados rieles y tirados al océano. ¿Qué sucedió con estos cuerpos? ¿Quién ha tomado la responsabilidad de estas muertes? El botón de nácar vuelve a hacer emerger el dolor de estas preguntas, reavivando una historia que está lejos de ser asumida y escrita de manera social y políticamente justa. El mar hace aquí eco al desierto de sus obras precedentes. Ambos paisajes son desmesurados cementerios. El cineasta se pregunta desconcertado, cómo Chile, un país que geográficamente está literalmente arrimado al océano, ha logrado desarrollar su cultura, su economía y sobre todo su memoria sin mirar hacia el agua.

El cine de Patricio Guzmán es eminentemente político, no se puede negar esta evidencia. Más por político no debemos entender necesariamente partidario, ni menos partidista. Sus películas vuelven al fundamento mismo de la palabra política (la polis era en Grecia la ciudad) al poner en el centro la problemática de construir comunidad y memoria en un país fundamentalmente divido por la violencia. La inclusión de las voces y presencias naturales marca un momento importante en su cine. Como la fotografía de la “Tierra azul”, sus películas se vuelven representaciones en las cuales los traumas individuales (los de una persona o de una nación específica) deben ser escuchados por la humanidad entera, y más allá. Son eventos que se inscriben geológicamente en la faz de la Tierra. Es éste el gran poder de su cine, el incluir el problema chileno en la historia misma de la humanidad y de la naturaleza. En su cine ambas cosas comunican y son finalmente, una misma cosa. Estas dos películas hacen eco a modos de pensamiento actuales y que consideramos urgentes, en los que la distinción entre lo “natural” y lo “cultural” es puesta en crisis. Si bien no iríamos hasta decir que el cine de Guzmán es “multinaturalista” (2) ni que es una práctica artística que se inscribe en esta(s) corriente(s) “decolonial”(es) de pensamiento, sí estalla en dos últimas obras una nueva poética que tiende hacia ello, cuyo vértigo sea tal vez aún más político.

 

Notas:

(1) Cortometrajes militantes de muy poca duración en 8mm realizados por autores como Godard, Resnais,…realizados en mayo y junio de 1968 como fruto de los eventos de contestación política de izquierda. La idea original habría sido de Chris Marker.

(2)  “(…) este nuevo estado de los mapas conceptuales nos condujo a sugerir el término “multinaturalismo” para designar uno de los trazos distintivos del pensamiento amerindio en relación con las cosmologías “multiculturalistas” modernas: mientras éstas se basan en la implicación mutua entre la unidad de la naturaleza y la multiplicidad de las culturas (…), la concepción amerindia supondría al contrario una unidad del espíritu y una diversidad de los cuerpos.” Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Metafísicas caníbales, p.20, PUF, París, 2009

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Flujos deseantes

How objects from processions turn into anthropological artifacts

Margaritas

Sun Splashed