Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Conectarse, desconectarse, volver a conectar: el museo lanzado hacia lo digital 

Opinión: Brenda J. Caro Cocotle

Ole Worm, Museum Wormia, 1655

Connecting, disconnecting, reconnecting: museums launched into the digital

The series of opinions on the cultural policies of the Mexican government regarding a public cultural system in crisis continues, for which Brenda J. Caro Cocotle reflects on the virtual format of museums in Mexico during the current quarantine period, which replicates and reinforces a limited institutional logic around consumerism in the orange economy.

 

Make

Reinvent yourself

Opening up to the digital world

Produce

To justify that you are

Answer

Produce

I would like to find a way to ensure that this text is not just another of many texts that try to explain what the situation of the pandemic has meant for art and culture in Mexico. However, this claim is absurd. Even if I hide my head like an ostrich, the matter would slip through the earth’s vibrations. On the other hand, I cannot help but pretend, like everyone else, to write and elucidate a setting because I find it—we find it—overwhelming to accept that it escapes any rule, theory, or philosophical position. Having said this, I write the following.

Make

Reinvent yourself

Opening up to the digital world

Produce

To justify that you are

Answer

Produce

I’m not going to talk about the 4T or its cultural policy. Or am I. I would like to point out a wider context which, although it includes it, I believe allows me to have a broader perspective, less polarized; colder if you like; less subject to circumscribing “adherence” or “opposition” to a character, ideology or cause. I am halfhearted, I will condemn myself to Hell—worse still, to the Purgatory of simple opinion.

Make

Reinvent yourself

Opening up to the digital world

Produce

To justify that you are

Answer

Produce

One of the most significant aspects we face today is digitalization as an immediate response to the temporary closure of physical spaces and a certain fraction of social spaces. Specifically, in the case of cultural institutions focused on researching, safeguarding, exhibiting and disseminating visual arts and cultural productions—museums, cultural centers, artist-run spaces—as well as other bodies in the art market—galleries, fairs, and biennials—the situation resulting from the health emergency brought to the fore a series of mechanisms, formats, and working devices that have formed its root. For the moment, art and its platforms [with capital letters? With lowercase letters?] have seen suspended a way of being and operating that, paradoxically, has depended on virtuality—understood as the power to update an image and/or discourse through a medium—[1]and on the imprint of corporeality that allows it to be activated. The closure of the museums—I take the museum as the figure that sums up all the others, knowing that important differences are obvious with it—was interpreted as the closure of an entire institutional machinery. For certain extreme positions, this closure implies the loss of art in its entirety. (¿!)

[Anonymous], Eye of a Lady, ca. 1800. Image from the public archive of the Smithsonian American Art Museum

The closure of the museum is presented as an inconceivable alternative. If it is stopped, it does not exist (which it does not). It is then required to remain deploying a visual architecture and presence from the digital. To make, to reinvent, to open themselves to the algorithm, to produce, to be in the network.

I would like to think that this demand is urged by a need to rethink the social character of the museum and its own institutional inertias with respect to the type of public space and public sphere it builds. However, I am afraid that the shift and the demand to move to the digital world comes from other types of economic logic and policies that have become part government, university, and private cultural policy, and that has been presented as a paradigm and must be inevitable for any institution that respects itself.

The museum is asked to be a content producer in constant activity. Produce, produce, produce. A production not so much linked to the critical sense towards other possibilities of research or of questioning of certain discourses, narratives, and institutional inertias; but to produce with the relevant being. In other words, produce to entertain or to justify a halt; produce within the margins of cognitive capitalism, produce to remain in the mainstream… Produce, produce, produce. The museum is not Netflix, but something similar is required of it: availability, renewal of the catalogue of options, novelty; providing experiences; whether they are significant or not. All it matters is to produce.

The demand for production also comes from another logic: that for which institutions have a justification if and only if they can prefigure that an (abstract) citizenry can have access to art and heritage, which implies the guarantee of a right to culture. However, under this perspective, cultural rights continue to be viewed from a unidirectional perspective (the institution) and restricted to only a part of them (of access). So, it has to be produced to demonstrate the role of institutions and that they fulfill their role and remit in that regard. The museum’s public action under the public administration must be made visible. Produce, produce, produce.

8-bit dinosaur

Maybe I’m being biased and unable to be assertive. I hear, not without interest and lack of reason, that the circumstance forces a new moment, that we have in our hands the opportunity to tear down the architecture of art; that museums will have to assume the challenge, to break down the barriers. No doubt about it. But what we have set out to do, for the moment, is to reproduce that same architecture, both literally and symbolically: We are still in search of a (virtual) exhibition that replicates the museographic format, to the extent that, if we have the resources, a 3D route that best translates the experience of the transit in the exhibition rooms will be articulated; the visual is reinforced, the body becomes mere eye; the “Art Star-system” is maintained; the numeralia of assistance gives way to the stats and the number of likes, reproductions and seen. We reproduce the same public sphere, the same themes as always, we stick to a single way of doing research from the museum. Neither our playlists nor our virtual conversations nor our lives dare to dismantle what, until a few months ago, was our certainty.

In fact, many of the practices that we try are aimed at sustaining those paradigms that have made the museum a business machine, a cultural industry that is valued for the goods and services it offers: to rescue an orange economy that is beginning to show itself to be sour and bitter. It is difficult to understand how these practices can be used as a means of making demands on public administration. How and in what terms are such practices considered? Do these practices include solidarity with demands for fair working conditions? Do they also imply a critique of what they maintain and reproduce, that is, the blockbuster museum, the piggyback museum, the design museum, the author’s museum?

Temple Museum/White Cube Museum/ Forum Museum/ Industry Museum/ Media Museum/ Company Museum… Why don’t we opt for silence, for the non-visible, for a pause to think about another public space, other bodies, the construction of new networks? Why have we stridently thrown ourselves into talking about how—HOW—to maintain the learned management models on which we have built schools, programs, trends, saints and names, instead of accepting that we know so much as nothing? And when we come back, what will we come back to? Who will be able to come back?

Make

Reinvent yourself

Opening up to the digital world

Produce

To justify that you are

Answer

A Zoom meeting is waiting for me. I produce. My radical stance ends where it meets the next mail that forces a response. Connect, disconnect, reconnect. I produce.

(Did I mention I’m halfhearted?)

Brenda J. Caro Cocotle (Xalapa, Ver., 1979) Graduated in Hispanic Language and Literature from the Universidad Veracruzana, Master in Museums from the Universidad Iberoamericana and Ph.D. in Museum Studies from the University of Leicester, Leicester, England. She worked in the Coordinación Nacional de Artes Plásticas, INBAL; the Coordinación de Difusión Cultural, UNAM; the Museo de Arte Moderno, INBAL; Casa Vecina, Fundación del Centro Histórico de la Ciudad de México, A.C., the Museo Universitario El Chopo, UNAM, and the Instituto de Artes Plásticas, Universidad Veracruzana. She has been a professor at the Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juan, the Universidad Autónoma de México, the Escuela Veracruzana de Cine “Luis Buñuel” and at the Faculty of History of the Universidad Veracruzana. She was in charge of the coordination of Grado_Cero, a specialization and research project in contemporary art and culture in the city of Xalapa, Veracruz. She was an eternal collaborator for the mobile gallery “Diego Rivera. Artista universal. Colección del Museo de Arte del Estado de Veracruz,” made by the Instituto Veracruzano de la Cultura. Currently, she is the curatorial coordinator at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Mexico City. She has collaborated with various specialized printed and digital magazines. Within the editorial field, she has served as style editor and editorial coordinator. She is the author of Paraguas de navegación (Mexico: IVEC, 2017), an album illustrated by Catalina Carvajal.

Notes

[1] For Bernard Deloche, virtuality is at the heart of the communication mechanisms deployed by the museum, starting with the museum institution itself. Take a look at Mr. D’s wonderful book: Bernard Deloche, El Museo Virtual: Hacia Una ética De Las Nuevas Imágenes (Spain: Trea Gijón, 2001).

Ole Worm, Museum Wormia, 1655

Continúa la serie de opiniones sobre las políticas culturales del gobierno de México a propósito de un sistema cultural público en crisis, para la cual Brenda J. Caro Cocotle reflexiona entorno al formato virtual de los museos en México durante el actual periodo de cuarentena, mismo que replica y refuerza una lógica institucional limitada entorno al consumismo de la economía naranja.

 

Hacer

Reinventarse

Abrirse al mundo digital

Producir

Justificar que se está

Responder

Producir

Quisiera encontrar la manera de que este texto no sea uno más de los muchos que intentan explicar lo que la coyuntura de la pandemia ha implicado para el arte y la cultura en México. Sin embargo, la pretensión es absurda. Aunque hundiera la cabeza cual avestruz, el asunto se colaría entre las vibraciones terrestres. Por otro lado, no puedo evitar, como todos, fingir que escribo y dilucido un entorno porque me resulta —nos resulta— abrumador aceptar que éste escapa a cualquier regla, teoría o postura filosófica. Una vez hecha esta disculpa, escribo entonces.

Hacer

Reinventarse

Abrirse al mundo digital

Producir

Justificar que se está

Responder

Producir

No voy a hablar sobre la 4T ni sobre su política cultural. O sí. Quiero señalar un contexto más amplio que si bien la incluye, considero me permite tener una perspectiva amplia, menos polarizada; más fría si se quiere; menos sujeta a circunscribirse a la “adherencia” u “oposición” a un personaje, ideología o causa. Soy tibia, me condenaré al Infierno —peor aún, al Purgatorio de la opinión fácil.

Hacer

Reinventarse

Abrirse al mundo digital

Producir

Justificar que se está

Responder

Producir

Uno de los aspectos más significativos a los que nos enfrentamos hoy en día es la digitalización como respuesta inmediata ante la clausura temporal del espacio físico y de cierta porción del espacio social. De manera concreta, en el caso de las instituciones culturales enfocadas a la investigación, resguardo, exhibición y difusión de las artes visuales y las producciones culturales —museos, centros culturales, espacios independientes—, así como otras instancias del mercado del arte —galerías, ferias y bienales—, la situación derivada de la emergencia sanitaria puso en alto a una serie de mecanismos, formatos y dispositivos de trabajo que han constituido su raíz. De momento, el arte y sus plataformas [¿con mayúsculas? ¿con minúsculas?] vieron suspendida una forma de ser y operar que, paradójicamente, ha dependido de la virtualidad —entendida como la potencia de actualización de una imagen y/o discurso a través de un medio[1] —y de la impronta de la corporalidad que permite que esta se active. El cierre del museo —tomo al museo como la figura que resume a todas las otras, a sabiendas que con ello obvio diferencias importantes— fue interpretado como el cierre de toda una maquinaria institucional. Para ciertas posturas tendientes al extremo, esa clausura implica la “pérdida del arte” en su totalidad. (¿!)

[Anónimo], Eye of a Lady, ca. 1800. Imagen parte del archivo público del Smithsonian American Art Museum

El cierre del museo se presenta como una alternativa inconcebible. Si se detiene, no existe (que no es así). Se le exige entonces permanezca desplegando una arquitectura visual y presencia desde lo digital. Hacer, reinventarse, abrirse al algoritmo, producir, estar en la red.

Me gustaría pensar que esta exigencia viene urgida por una necesidad de repensar el carácter social del museo y sus propias inercias institucionales respecto al tipo de espacio público y de esfera pública que construye. Sin embargo, me temo que el viraje y la “demanda” por trasladarse a lo digital deviene de otro tipo de lógicas y políticas económicas que se han vuelto parte de la política cultural gubernamental, universitaria y privada, y que se han presentado como paradigma y deber ser inevitable de toda institución que se respete.

Al museo se le pide ser un productor de contenidos en constante actividad. Producir, producir, producir. Una producción no tanto vinculada con el sentido crítico hacia otras posibilidades de investigación o de cuestionamiento de determinados, discursos, narrativas e inercias institucionales; sino producir con el ser relevante. En otros términos, producir para entretener o para justificar una permanencia; producir dentro de los márgenes del capitalismo cognitivo, producir para continuar en el mainstream… Producir, producir, producir. El museo no es Netflix, pero se le exige algo parecido: disponibilidad, renovación el catálogo de opciones, novedad; brindar experiencias; sean significativas o no importa poco. Importa producir.

La demanda de la producción viene también desde otra lógica: aquella para la que las instituciones tienen una justificación sí y sólo sí pueden prefigurar que una ciudadanía (abstracta) pueda tener acceso al arte y al patrimonio, lo cual supone la garantía de un derecho a la cultura. Sin embargo, bajo esta perspectiva, los derechos culturales siguen siendo contemplados desde una perspectiva unidireccional (la institución) y restringidos a sólo una parte de los mismos (el acceso). De modo que hay que producir para demostrar la función de las instituciones y que cumplen con su papel y atribución en ese sentido. La acción pública del museo bajo la administración pública debe hacerse visible. Producir, producir, producir.

8-bit dinosaur

Quizá estoy siendo parcial y poco propositiva. Escucho, no sin interés y falta de razón, que la circunstancia obliga a un nuevo momento, que tenemos en las manos la oportunidad de hacer que la arquitectura del arte se desbarate; que los museos tendrán que asumir el desafío, derribar las barreras. Sin duda. Pero a lo que nos hemos abocado, de momento, es a reproducir esa misma arquitectura, de modo literal y simbólico: seguimos en la búsqueda de la exposición (virtual) que replique el formato museográfico, al grado de que, si se tiene los recursos, se articulará un recorrido 3D que traduzca lo mejor posible la experiencia del tránsito en las salas; lo visual se refuerza, el cuerpo se vuelve mero ojo; el “Art Star-system” se mantiene; la numeralia de asistencia cede el lugar a los stats y a la cantidad de “me gusta”, reproducciones y “visto”. Reproducimos la misma esfera pública, los temas de siempre, nos aferramos a un solo modo de hacer investigación desde el museo. Ni nuestros playlists ni nuestros conversatorios virtuales ni nuestros lives se atreven a desmontar lo que, hasta hace unos meses, era nuestra certeza.

De hecho, muchas de estas prácticas que intentamos están orientadas a sostener esos paradigmas que han hecho del museo una máquina empresarial, una industria cultural aquilatada por los bienes y servicios que ofrece: a rescatar una economía naranja que comienza a mostrarse agria y aceda. Prácticas que es difícil entender cómo es que se enarbolan a manera de demandas hacia la administración pública. ¿Cómo y en qué términos se plantean dichas prácticas? ¿Esas prácticas contemplan solidaridad con las demandas por condiciones laborales justas? ¿Implican también una crítica a lo que sostienen y reproducen, es decir, al museo blockbuster, al museo changuero, al museo de diseño, al museo de autor?

Museo templo/ Museo cubo blanco/ Museo foro/ Museo industria/ Museo mediatizado/ Museo empresa… ¿Por qué no optamos por el silencio, por lo no visible, por la pausa para pensar sobre otro espacio público, otras corporalidades, la construcción de nuevos vínculos? ¿Por qué nos hemos lanzado con estridencia a hablar sobre cómo —CÓMO— mantener los modelos de gestión aprendidos sobre los que hemos construido escuelas, programas, tendencias, santones y nombres, en vez de aceptar que sabemos tanto igual a nada? Y cuándo volvamos, ¿a qué volveremos? ¿Quiénes podrán volver? 

Hacer

Reinventarse

Abrirse al mundo digital

Producir

Justificar que se está

Responder

Una junta por Zoom me espera. Produzco. Mi postura radical termina donde se encuentra con el siguiente correo que obliga una respuesta. Conectarse, desconectarse, volver a conectar. Produzco.

(¿Ya mencioné que soy tibia?)

Brenda J. Caro Cocotle (Xalapa, Ver., 1979) Licenciada en Lengua y Literatura Hispánicas por la Universidad Veracruzana, maestra en Museos por la Universidad Iberoamericana y doctora en Museum Studies por la University of Leicester, Leicester, Inglaterra. Trabajó en la Coordinación Nacional de Artes Plásticas, INBAL; la Coordinación de Difusión Cultural, UNAM; el Museo de Arte Moderno, INBAL; Casa Vecina, Fundación del Centro Histórico de la Ciudad de México, A.C., el Museo Universitario del Chopo, UNAM y el Instituto de Artes Plásticas, Universidad Veracruzana. Ha sido profesor en la Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juan, la Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, la Escuela Veracruzana de Cine “Luis Buñuel” y en la facultad de Historia de la Universidad Veracruzana. Estuvo a cargo de la coordinación de Grado_Cero, proyecto de especialización e investigación en arte y cultura contemporánea en la ciudad de Xalapa, Veracruz. Fue colaboradora eterna para la galería móvil “Diego Rivera. Artista universal. Colección del Museo de Arte del Estado de Veracruz”, realizado por el Instituto Veracruzano de la Cultura. Actualmente, es Coordinadora curatorial en el Museo de Arte Moderno de la Ciudad de México. Ha colaborado con diversas revistas impresas y digitales especializadas. Dentro del rubro editorial, se ha desempeñado como correctora de estilo y coordinadora editorial. Es autora de Paraguas de navegación (México: IVEC, 2017), álbum ilustrado por Catalina Carvajal.

Notas

 

[1] Para Bernard Deloche, la virtualidad, está en el centro de los mecanismos de comunicación desplegados por el museo, empezando por la institución museal en sí. Déle una lectura al estupendo libro del Sr. D.: Bernard Deloche, El Museo Virtual: Hacia Una ética De Las Nuevas Imágenes (España: Trea Gijón, 2001).

Tags: , , , , , ,

Campana

Let the Building Be the Sign

Polifonías

Chicharrón