Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

The Value of Rage

By Morgan Fisher and Tenzing Barshee

The American artist and the Swiss curator discuss the crisis of democracy, celebrity culture in the US, and social media as an outlet for resistance.

El artista estadounidense y el curador suizo hablan sobre la crisis de la democracia, la cultura de la celebridad en Estados Unidos y sobre las redes sociales como un espacio para la resistencia.

MF_V_1984_01.002.L

Morgan Fisher, Standard Gauge, 1984. 16-mm. Color, optical sound, 35′ filmstill. Courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

In his work, the artist Morgan Fisher, has been preoccupied with the problem of the expressive authorial voice in a work of art, an exemplary problem of industrial production. This harks back to his background in the film industry, but even more so, to the approaches of avant-garde film and art of the late sixties. His contributions to film date back to that time, and those to painting to the late nineties. Both remain significant and influential to generations of artists. In recent years, he established another public voice, which is in fact quite expressive. He’s been voicing his opinions on US politics and media on Facebook. His voice echoes his determination and position. More than once, he uttered “J’accuse”, in one way or another. Our writer talked with Morgan Fisher about his engagement and the state of things.

Tenzing Barshee: From reading your comments on social media, I assume that you are a close observer of both the political landscape in the US as well as its representation in the media.

Morgan Fisher: I could be a much closer and more active one. I admire what Andrea Bowers is doing. She has made political activism a part of her artistic practice in a way that I find extremely powerful. The work doesn’t aestheticize the means of such activism, it simply presents it for what it is: leaflets supporting strikers, leaflets supporting efforts to unionize. This direct presentation in a gallery space is quite shocking, in the best possible sense. There are photographs of demonstrators, the majority of which are people of color. And she herself is out there with the protesters. She went to Standing Rock. I didn’t. But about the strategy of not aestheticizing, I once heard Allan Sekula, for whose work I have great admiration, criticize Leon Golub for doing just that. A stylized painting of police beating someone up doesn’t add to our knowledge or make us see it in a way that tells us what we can do about it.

Bowers_450_WomxnWorkersOfTheWorldUnite!_hires

Andrea Bowers, Womxn Workers of the World Unite! (May Day March 2015, Los Angeles, California), 2016. Colored pencil on paper, 73.66cm x 55.88cm. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter, Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Jeff McLane.

TB: What is the extent of your engagement with politicians and the media?

MF: I have on occasion written to my senators and to my representative in Congress. I’m just a plain old liberal and so is my congressperson, so I have fewer occasions to write to him. But my senators, although they are both Democrats, are another story. I can’t remember what I last wrote to them about, but I think it had to do with urging them to release the torture report. Besides sending letters to the editors of the Times and to its public editor, a while ago I sent two essays to the editor of its op-ed page. They’ve never printed anything I’ve sent them. Lately I have made comments about specific articles in the online edition of the paper. I put one up just today.

TB: When did you start writing to the New York Times?

MF: It was outrage, or at least great anger, that was the beginning of my writing letters, and it happened relatively recently, just before the Iraq war. It was obvious that the United States was going to invade Iraq, thus committing a war crime, and if my memory is correct the Times had nothing to say about this; not about whether or not it was a good idea or justified, let alone that invading Iraq would be a war crime. The Times was not in the least skeptical about the administration’s story that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. So my outrage was twofold: at the course the US was about to take, and the silence of the Times about that course, silence that I will call complicity. As we now understand, the war gave rise to ISIS and all that has ensued from it, including the war in Syria and mass migration from the Middle East to Turkey and Europe, which in turn aided the rise of the extreme right in Europe. It’s been an utter disaster of ever-widening consequence, and it was the doing of only a few people, albeit with the complicity of a passive and credulous Congress and press. Remember the contempt that members of the Congress heaped on France for not joining the US and Great Britain in the war? France was ridiculed as being a part of “old Europe,” that is, irrelevant, and the cafeteria in the House of Representatives changed the name of French fries to Freedom fries. Bush and Cheney and Wolfowitz and all the others are war criminals, but they remain unpunished.

?????????

Installation view: Morgan Fisher, Door Painting, Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Aachen 2002. Courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: How did your exchange with the Times continue?

MF: Recently there was an op-ed piece in the Times that so enraged me that I wrote a comment that I knew was longer than what the site would accept but I couldn’t help myself. The author is associated with a right-wing think tank. The piece was about how it’s a good thing that Trump is scaring the world, on the principle that scaring others is the only way for the US to fulfill its destiny as the world’s sole superpower, that is, to push people around. Some of the people who are scared are the European allies of the US, who don’t know whether or not the US will fulfill its obligations under NATO to protect them from Putin. Besides it being too long, by the time I finished it, the deadline for submitting comments had passed, so I put it up on Facebook. I’ve put up other things I’ve written on Facebook, chiefly letters to the editors of the Times. In its limited way, it makes them public, and of course I hope it encourages others to take a more active part in things, just as posts by others, and there are many of them, encourage me to be more active.

TB: Then you denounced the paper for the language they choose.  

MF: It was disgraceful that the Times used the phrase “enhanced interrogation” instead of calling it torture, another instance of its swallowing the line of those in power. I was one of many people who wrote to them about this. I recall that the public editor dismissed objections to the phrase, as if laughingly correcting the error of a naïve child, by saying that to call it torture would be to take sides, as if calling it enhanced interrogation did not take sides. Enough people wrote to complain that the Times finally started calling it torture, but it should never have called it enhanced interrogation in the first place. A more recent example of something similar is the Times’s using the word “alt-right” straight, so to speak, without quotation marks or other qualifiers to let the reader know that it is a term that white supremacists and other extremists have given themselves to hide their true nature. Even the Associated Press tells its writers not to use the word straight but to put it in quotes or add a qualifier like “so-called,” but in the meantime the Times says writers have discretion in how they use the word, which is a complete scandal.

?????????

Installation view: Morgan Fisher, Door Painting, Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Aachen 2002. Courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: Is there a general disillusionment with the traditional media?

MF: It is a shock to remember that only two or three newspapers of serious standing in the US endorsed Trump, while all of the others, and there were scores of them, endorsed Hillary, some explicitly speaking out against Trump, and yet he was elected. The competing realities presented by alternative news sources recalls Hannah Arendt’s remark, which I learned about on Facebook, that those prone to accepting totalitarianism are those for whom the distinctions between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exist. We first had a whiff of this new state of affairs, questioning what is fact, what is true, during the administration of the second Bush, when someone high up in his circle said something to the effect that facts don’t matter anymore, people in his administration determine what reality is.

TB: But then there is social media.

MF: Besides putting up on Facebook things that I have written to the Times, I comment on what others have put up. Generally, what Robert Reich, who was Clinton’s Secretary of Labor for four years, has to say is important, although I don’t agree with everything he says. For example, assuming that Clinton would win the election, he had suggested that she appoint Obama to the Supreme Court. I strongly disagreed, saying that Obama’s refusal to obey the international treaty that requires him to prosecute the torturers shows that he does not believe in the rule of law, as I had said to those who had urged this earlier. I also wrote to Obama to urge him to follow the law. I have found Facebook to be a very helpful forum for political matters. From Facebook I learned about Timothy Snyder’s twenty points for defending democracy under Trump and I was reminded of Hannah Arendt’s book The Origins of Totalitarianism, the source of the passage I summarized above, and which I had never read. I should read it, and so should everyone.

?????????

Installation view: Morgan Fisher, Door and Window Paintings, Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Aachen 2002. Courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: In your writing you often choose an accusatory tone, is this something that drives your public opinion?

MF: Being enraged, or angry, is a great motivator, and it readily helps to organize my thinking. I happened to read The Road to Wigan Pier a while ago, and it’s clear that part of what prompted George Orwell to write it is outrage, although it’s complicated by the fact that he is outraged by the resignation of the people whose suffering outrages him, such that his outrage at their resignation turns into scorn for them. He is very hard on the woebegone couple who run the tea and tripe shop for their knowing that they are miserable but feeling there is nothing they can do to try to change their situation. And he’s also outraged by the conduct in daily life of the socialists who he is telling us are England’s only hope. If only those socialists would give up their eccentric way of dressing that makes them ridiculous in the eyes of others and turns respectable people against them. Turning outrage to constructive ends is a model we should all aspire to. Outrage alone gives you something to say, and having something to say is really all you need.

TB: Can you trace your political engagement to your position as a younger man?

MF: In a word, no. When I was younger I was quiet, much more than I should have been. When I was in college I wrote a letter to a national weekly magazine ridiculing Barry Goldwater, who was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona and the Republican Party’s nominee for President of the United States in the 1964 election, and I got hate mail. Only a few letters, but I was shocked that I got any at all, which was very naïve of me. That had an effect on me. A few years later, I was angry about the war in Vietnam, even angrier than I was about the invasion of Iraq, but it took me longer than it should have to come to that view, and I did not express it publicly. Going back further, I was a kid during the McCarthy period, but my parents had nothing to say about it. They were suburban Democrats and ran no risk whatsoever by being harmed by McCarthyism. You’d think the safety of their situation would have let them explain things but maybe it was the other way around, if they had been at risk maybe they would have talked to me about it. The town where I grew up was overwhelmingly Republican, but old-fashioned Republicanism, of a kind that can be called respectable, last represented by someone like Nelson Rockefeller, not what the party has become. But my parents knew even in the early 1950s that Nixon was a crook, I think from his Red-baiting campaign for the US Senate in 1950. It’s worth looking up. What he did is really appalling. That’s when he got the nickname Tricky Dick. In relation to his conduct then, none of the bad things he did in his later political life were a surprise.

MF_V_1984_01.003.L

Morgan Fisher, Standard Gauge, 1984. 16-mm. Color, optical sound, 35′ filmstill. Courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: How does your political opinion reverberate with the current state of “difficulty” (to cite Terremoto’s editorial) that many societies are facing today?

MF: Earlier today I read an interview with Noam Chomsky published in a Sri Lankan newspaper on December 14. He talked about the role of scapegoating in the rise of reaction that is occurring today. He said, “[T]he typical history of scapegoating is to pick vulnerable people and find something that is not totally false about them —because you have to have some element of truth— and then build it up into a colossus which is about to overcome you.” Trump certainly found lots of groups to scapegoat, for instance illegal immigrants, and the people who felt that they are not getting their share of the American dream because of the groups Trump scapegoated voted for him. But of course Trump and people in other countries who scapegoat certainly have no interest in addressing the concerns of the aggrieved who voted for them, they are interested only in exploiting those grievances to serve their own self-interest and the interest of a powerful and rich elite. That’s Trump’s program: tax cuts for the rich, the elimination of the estate tax, which will create a permanent moneyed elite that will be able to buy elections to further secure its hold on power, of course at the expense of everybody else, the elimination of Obamacare, deportation of illegal immigrants on a massive scale, which we can hope is such a fantasy that it will be beyond his power to make it happen. If Trump has his way, he will be able to set the Supreme Court in a direction that will take decades to recover from, if that will ever even still be possible. He and Ryan, the speaker of the House of Representatives, want to send America back to the age of robber baron capitalism. But the radical changes the Republicans could make might help reverse the decline of unions or might otherwise energize the left to organize and fight back. The shocking thing is how few people voted, as if there were nothing at stake or as if there were no difference between Trump and Clinton. An article in the Times quoted someone as saying that he didn’t vote because neither candidate said they would do something for him. I could hardly believe it. And there were young women who said they couldn’t relate to Clinton. For these reasons among many others that must be equally irrational we have elected a blustering ignorant racist misogynist who has never held elective office. Part of the problem must be that too many people seem to think of political campaigns and how they are covered as a form of entertainment, without substance, which I guess comes from celebrity culture. Chomsky said something very powerful but chilling: “As long as the general population is passive, apathetic, diverted to consumerism or hatred of the vulnerable, then the powerful can do as they please, and those who survive will be left to contemplate the outcome.” Celebrity culture is a form of consumerism, the consumption of personalities. That is the situation we are in, or on the verge of if we are not within it already, and part of how the media treats Trump is as if he were merely a celebrity, not much different than, say, Taylor Swift, instead of as someone about to become the most powerful person in the world and of whom we should all be very afraid. So the question is what to do to get people to care, to realize that if they don’t take part in politics their lives will only get worse, to try to make the changes that will overcome voter suppression, to get people to register to vote, to get people to vote. If Obama is looking for something to do after he leaves office, that effort is something he could lead. I know this is all perfectly obvious, but I do want to say these things.

96395_5A.tif

Morgan Fisher, Ideal Fine Grain 120 December 1951, 2011. Archival pigment print. 40.6 x 50.8 cm. Courtesy Bortolami Gallery, New York.

MF7024

Morgan Fisher, Negative Ideal Fine Grain 120 December 1951, 2015. Archival pigment print. 40.6 x 50.8 cm. Courtesy Bortolami Gallery, New York.

TB: How does this culminate in the current crisis of democracy?

MF: What you call the current crisis of democracy, in this country at least, is owed in large part to indifference to the crucial importance of being more informed about the issues and taking part in political life. It’s partly a matter of politics being seen as an extension of celebrity culture and partly a matter of scapegoating. Is it too much to say that these two things together elected Trump? As has been noted by others, it is absolutely shocking how the media coverage of the election paid attention to relative trivialities and not to the differences in what Trump and Clinton stood for. I don’t have a television, so I don’t know what Clinton said on TV, but in the Times and in social media there was little that I can recall about what she stood for, beyond her being a Democrat. I sure knew what Sanders stood for, even though he didn’t get the attention that Clinton did. It’s beyond shocking that Trump has installed Steve Bannon, who is a mouthpiece for white supremacism, as his advisor about strategy, a position that is not subject to confirmation. One scenario is that Trump with the help of Republicans in Congress will do so much damage to essential American institutions, such as Medicare, Social Security, progressive taxation, and the right to vote, not to mention Obamacare, that the electorate will react and return at least the Senate to Democratic control two years hence. I just hope that in the meantime Trump and the Republican majorities don’t destroy America, not to mention other parts of the world, or the world itself. But perhaps we won’t have to wait two years. There is a chance that there are enough Republicans in the Senate who are principled enough and conscientious enough to understand how dangerous Trump is to crucial American institutions and to the world order that they will refuse to vote with other Republicans to implement his programs. That will take real political courage, but I would like to think that it’s possible.

MF2008_inst_ab_01

Installation view: Morgan Fisher, Door and Window Paintings, Art Basel Unlimited, 2008. Courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: How do you compare our present day to previous national and global challenges that you’ve experienced?

MF: The challenges I’ve lived through have been finite, by which I mean they’ve ended, for example the Cuban missile crisis, although the root of that crisis and others that have come and gone is American exceptionalism. This is America’s view of itself that it is not bound by the same standards of behavior as other countries. Of course it is only America’s being an uncontested superpower that makes this view possible, which its power reinforces. But there have been crises for other reasons that have had long-lasting consequences, for example the Red scare at the end of the forties into the 1950s, which gave us the blacklist in the entertainment industry and McCarthyism. And there are continuing conditions that we should call crises, and they’re getting more acute. As Chomsky has observed, over the years there have been very close calls with nuclear weapons. There have been false alarms, some, I believe, resulting in calls to launch that were disobeyed only because someone was skeptical about the reliability of the alarm. And bombs have been mislaid due to accidents. It’s a matter of luck that there have been no disasters, but the world’s luck can’t hold out forever, and the risk will only increase with the increase of the number of countries with nuclear capability, not to mention the growing likelihood of rogue actors. The chances of controlling, let alone reducing, the spread of nuclear arms appears, I am sorry to say, very remote, not a cheerful picture. And, again turning to Chomsky, there’s climate change, which ought to be called climate catastrophe. Trump’s view of it, that it’s a hoax, is a scandal, but it does three things all at once. It scapegoats the Chinese, it signals to the rich that he, like them, is committed to free-market capitalism, to the point of standing by while the fossil fuel industry wreaks devastation on the planet, and it signals to those of his supporters who are not rich, who are less educated or are evangelicals, that, like them, he is anti-elitist, anti-education, anti-knowledge, that is, against knowledge based on facts. Even if Trump committed the US to fighting climate catastrophe and trying to provide leadership for other countries to do so, it’s probably already too late, that the chances of action on a global scale that will be able to slow it down, let alone halt it, are remote. So there will be mass extinctions, upheavals in agriculture, and as coastal areas are flooded, for example in Bangladesh, there will be climate refugees, creating a humanitarian catastrophe. Already there is migration from sub-Saharan Africa to Europe that is related to climate catastrophe.

MF_V_1984_01.002.L

Morgan Fisher, Standard Gauge, 1984. 16-mm. Color, optical sound, 35′ filmstill. Cortesía Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

El valor de la furia

En su trabajo, el artista Morgan Fisher se ha preocupado por el problema de la voz que expresa autoría en una obra de arte, una cuestión ejemplar de la producción industrial. Esto se remonta a su experiencia en la industria cinematográfica, pero más aún, a los enfoques de la vanguardia del cine y el arte de finales de los sesenta. Sus contribuciones al cine datan de ese tiempo, y las de la pintura datan de finales de los noventa. Ambas siguen siendo importantes e influyentes para generaciones de artistas. En años recientes, Fisher estableció otro tipo de voz pública, que es de hecho muy expresiva. Ha estado publicando sus opiniones sobre la política y los medios estadounidenses en Facebook. Su voz hace eco de su determinación y su postura. Más de una vez ha pronunciado “Yo acuso” de una manera u otra. Tenzing Barshee habló con Morgan Fisher sobre su compromiso y el estado de las cosas.

Tenzing Barshee: Al leer tus comentarios en las redes sociales, asumo que eres un observador cercano tanto del panorama político en los Estados Unidos como de su representación en los medios de comunicación.

Morgan Fisher: Podría ser mucho más cercano y más activo. Admiro lo que Andrea Bowers está haciendo. Ella ha hecho del activismo político una parte de su práctica artística de una manera que me parece extremadamente poderosa. Su trabajo no estetiza los medios de tal activismo, simplemente lo presenta como es: folletos de apoyo a los huelguistas, folletos de apoyo a los esfuerzos de sindicalización. Esta presentación directa en un espacio de galería es bastante impactante, en el mejor sentido posible. Hay fotografías de manifestantes, la mayoría de los cuales son personas de color. Y ella misma está allí con los manifestantes. Ella fue a Standing Rock. Yo no fui. Pero en cuanto a la estrategia de no estetizar, una vez escuché a Allan Sekula, por cuyo trabajo tengo gran admiración, criticar a Leon Golub por hacer eso. Una pintura estilizada de la policía golpeando a alguien no incrementa nuestro conocimiento o nos hace ver la situación de una manera que nos diga lo que podemos hacer al respecto.

Bowers_450_WomxnWorkersOfTheWorldUnite!_hires

Andrea Bowers, Womxn Workers of the World Unite! (May Day March 2015, Los Angeles, California), 2016. Colored pencil on paper, 73.66cm x 55.88cm. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter, Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Jeff McLane.

TB: ¿Cuál es el alcance de tu compromiso con los políticos y los medios de comunicación?

MF: En ocasiones he escrito a mis senadores y a mi representante en el Congreso. Yo soy un simple liberal y mi congresista también lo es, así que tengo menos ocasiones de escribirle. Pero mis senadores, aunque ambos son demócratas, son otra historia. No recuerdo sobre qué les escribí la última vez, pero creo que tenía que ver con instarlos a que publicaran el informe de tortura [Informe del Comité de Inteligencia del Senado sobre la Tortura de la CIA 2001-2006 (2012)]. Además de enviar cartas a los editores del Times y a su editor público, hace un tiempo envié dos ensayos al editor de su página de editoriales de opinión. Nunca han publicado nada de lo que les he enviado. Últimamente he hecho comentarios sobre artículos específicos en la edición en línea del artículo. Justo puse uno hoy.

TB: ¿Cuándo le empezaste a escribir al New York Times?

MF: Fue un escándalo, o al menos una gran ira, lo que detonó el comienzo de mis cartas, y sucedió hace relativamente poco, justo antes de la guerra de Irak. Era obvio que Estados Unidos iba a invadir Irak, cometiendo así un crimen de guerra, y si mi recuerdo es correcto, el Times no tuvo nada que decir sobre esto; sobre si era una buena idea o si era justificada, y mucho menos sobre el hecho que invadir Irak sería un crimen de guerra. El Times no estaba ni un poco escéptico sobre la historia del gobierno de que Irak tenía armas de destrucción masiva. Así que mi indignación fue doble: por el curso que Estados Unidos estaba a punto de tomar, y por el silencio del Times sobre ese curso, silencio que llamaré complicidad. Como entendemos ahora, esa guerra dio origen a ISIS y a todo lo que se ha producido, incluyendo la guerra en Siria y la migración masiva desde Oriente Medio hacia Turquía y Europa, lo que a su vez contribuyó al ascenso de la extrema derecha en Europa. Ha sido un desastre total de consecuencias cada vez más amplias, y fue obra de pocas personas, aunque con la complicidad de un Congreso y una prensa pasivos y crédulos. ¿Recuerdan el desprecio que los miembros del Congreso dirigieron contra Francia por no unirse a Estados Unidos y Gran Bretaña en la guerra? Francia fue ridiculizada como parte de la “vieja Europa”, es decir, como irrelevante, y la cafetería de la Cámara de Representantes cambió el nombre de French fries a Freedom fries. Bush, Cheney, Wolfowitz y todos los demás son criminales de guerra, pero permanecen impunes.

?????????

Installation view: Morgan Fisher, Door Painting, Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Aachen 2002. Cortesía Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: ¿Cómo continuó tu intercambio con el Times?

MF: Recientemente hubo un editorial en el Times que me enfureció tanto que escribí un comentario que sabía que era más largo de lo que el sitio aceptaría, pero no pude evitarlo. El autor del editorial está asociado con un think-tank de derecha. La pieza hablaba de lo bueno que es que Trump asuste al mundo, partiendo del principio de que asustar a otros es la única manera de que los Estados Unidos cumplan su destino como la única superpotencia del mundo, es decir, pasándole por encima a la gente. Algunos que están asustados son los aliados europeos de los Estados Unidos, que no saben si los Estados Unidos cumplirán sus obligaciones estipuladas bajo la OTAN para protegerlos de Putin. Además de ser demasiado largo, para el momento en que terminé el comentario, el plazo para enviarlo había pasado, así que lo publiqué en Facebook. He puesto otras cosas que he escrito en Facebook, principalmente cartas a los editores del Times. En una forma limitada, esto hace públicas mis opiniones y por supuesto espero que esto aliente a otros a tomar una postura más activa en las cosas, de la misma forma en que las publicaciones de los demás –y hay muchas– me animan a ser más activo.

TB: Luego denunciaste al periódico por el lenguaje que usan.

MF: Fue una vergüenza que el Times usara la frase “interrogatorio reforzado” en lugar de llamarlo tortura, otro ejemplo de cómo el periódico se tragó entero el discurso de los que estaban en el poder. Yo fui una de las muchas personas que les escribieron sobre esto. Recuerdo que el editor público rechazó las objeciones a la frase, como corrigiendo burlonamente el error de un niño ingenuo, como si llamarlo interrogatorio reforzado no implicara tomar partido. Suficientes personas escribieron para quejarse hasta que el Times finalmente empezó a llamarlo tortura, pero nunca debería haberlo llamado “interrogatorio reforzado”; en primer lugar. Un ejemplo más reciente de algo similar es que el Times usa la palabra alt-right directamente, por así decirlo, sin comillas ni otros calificativos para hacerle saber al lector que es un término que los supremacistas blancos y otros extremistas se han otorgado a sí mismos para ocultar su verdadera naturaleza. Incluso la Associated Press les dice a sus escritores que no usen la palabra directamente, sino que la pongan entre comillas o añadan un calificativo como “los llamados”; mientras tanto el Times dice que los escritores tienen discreción en cómo usan la palabra, lo que es un escándalo absoluto.

?????????

Installation view: Morgan Fisher, Door Painting, Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Aachen 2002. Cortesía Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: ¿Existe una desilusión general con los medios de comunicación tradicionales?

MF: Es impactante recordar que sólo dos o tres periódicos de reputación seria en Estados Unidos apoyaron a Trump, mientras que todos los demás, y hubo decenas de ellos, respaldaron a Hillary, algunos hablando explícitamente en contra de Trump, y, sin embargo, fue elegido. La competencia de realidades presentada por fuentes de noticias alternativas recuerda la observación de Hannah Arendt, que aprendí en Facebook, de que aquellos propensos a aceptar el totalitarismo son aquellos para quienes ya no existen las distinciones entre hecho y ficción, entre verdadero y falso. Ya habíamos tenido una prueba de este nuevo estado de las cosas, que cuestiona lo que es un hecho, lo que es cierto, durante la administración del segundo Bush; en ese entonces alguien de alto rango en su círculo dijo algo que iba en el sentido de que los hechos ya no importaban, pues la gente en su administración determinaba qué era la realidad.

TB: Pero luego están las redes sociales.

MF: Además de publicar en Facebook cosas que le he escrito al Times, comento sobre lo que otros publican. Generalmente lo que Robert Reich (que fue Secretario de Trabajo de Clinton durante cuatro años) tiene para decir es importante, aunque no estoy de acuerdo con todo lo que dice. Por ejemplo, asumiendo que Clinton ganaría las elecciones, él había sugerido que Clinton nombrara a Obama a la Corte Suprema. Yo estaba muy en desacuerdo, ya que la negativa de Obama a obedecer el tratado internacional que lo obliga a procesar a los torturadores demuestra que él no cree en el estado de derecho, como lo dije a los que habían pedido eso antes. También escribí a Obama para instarlo a seguir la ley. He encontrado en Facebook un foro muy útil para asuntos políticos: por ejemplo, aprendí sobre los veinte puntos de Timothy Snyder para defender la democracia bajo Trump y me acordé del libro de Hannah Arendt, Los orígenes del totalitarismo, fuente del pasaje que he resumido anteriormente. Claramente, es un libro que todos debemos leer.

?????????

Installation view: Morgan Fisher, Door and Window Paintings, Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Aachen 2002. Cortesía Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: En tu escritura eliges a menudo un tono acusatorio, ¿es esto algo que conduce tu opinión pública?

MF: Estar enojado o rabioso es una gran motivación, y me ayuda fácilmente a organizar mi pensamiento. Por casualidad leí The Road to Wigan Pier (1937) hace un tiempo, y está claro que parte de lo que llevó a George Orwell a escribirlo es la indignación, aunque es complicado pues él está indignado por la resignación de la gente al sufrimiento, de modo que la indignación por su resignación se convierte en desprecio por ellos. Él es muy duro con la pareja miserable que maneja la tienda de té y tripas pues saben que son infelices pero sienten que no hay nada que puedan hacer para tratar de cambiar su situación. Y también está indignado por la conducta cotidiana de los socialistas que él nos dice que son la única esperanza de Inglaterra. Si sólo esos socialistas renunciaran a su excéntrica forma de vestirse, que los ridiculiza a los ojos de los demás y pone a la gente respetable en su contra. Convertir la indignación en fines constructivos es un modelo al que todos debemos aspirar. La rabia te da algo que decir y tener algo que decir es realmente todo lo que necesitas.

TB: ¿Puedes rastrear tu compromiso político hacia tu posición siendo un hombre joven?

MF: En una palabra, no. Cuando era joven era callado, mucho más de lo que debería haber sido. Cuando estaba en la universidad escribí una letra a una revista nacional semanal ridiculizando a Barry Goldwater, quien era senador de los Estados Unidos por Arizona por un periodo de cinco años y nominado por el Partido Republicano para la elección de 1964 para Presidente de los Estados Unidos, y obtuve correos de odio. Sólo unas cuantas cartas, pero me sorprendía siquiera haber recibido algo, lo cual era muy ingenuo de mi parte. Eso tuvo un efecto en mí. Pocos años después, estaba enojado por la guerra en Vietnam, aún más enojado de lo que estuve por la invasión de Irak, pero me tomó más de lo que debería haberme tomado llegar a ese punto de vista, y no lo expresé públicamente. Yendo aún más atrás, yo era un niño durante el periodo de McCarthy, pero mis padres no tenían nada que decir al respecto. Eran demócratas de los suburbios y no corrían ningún riesgo de ser perjudicados por el gobierno de McCarthy. Pensarías que la seguridad de su situación les permitiría explicar cosas pero tal vez era todo lo contrario, si hubieran estado en riesgo quizás me hubieran hablado de ello. La ciudad donde crecí era abrumadoramente republicana, pero un republicanismo a la antigua, de un tipo que puede ser llamado respetable, en última representado por alguien como Nelson Rockefeller, no en lo que el partido se ha convertido. Pero mis padres sabían incluso a inicios de los 50s que Nixon era un criminal, creo que por su campaña de acoso y persecución de comunistas en el senado en 1950. Vale la pena revisar. Lo que hizo es realmente horrible. Fue entonces cuando obtuvo el apodo Tricky Dick. En relación a su conducta de ese momento, ninguna de las cosas malas que hizo después en su vida política fue una sorpresa.

MF_V_1984_01.003.L

Morgan Fisher, Standard Gauge, 1984. 16-mm. Color, optical sound, 35′ filmstill. Cortesía Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: ¿Cómo repercute tu opinión política con el actual estado de “dificultad” (para citar el editorial de Terremoto) al que se enfrentan muchas sociedades hoy en día?

MF: Hoy leí una entrevista con Noam Chomsky publicada en un periódico de Sri Lanka el 14 de diciembre. Habló sobre el papel del chivo expiatorio en el aumento reaccionario que está ocurriendo hoy en día. Decía: “La historia típica de los chivos expiatorios es escoger a personas vulnerables y encontrar algo que no es totalmente falso sobre ellas –porque hay que tener un elemento de verdad– y luego convertirlo en un coloso, que está a punto de superarte.” Trump sin duda identificó muchos grupos como chivos expiatorios (por ejemplo, a los inmigrantes ilegales) y las personas que votaron por él eran las que sentían que no están recibiendo su parte del sueño americano debido a esos grupos. Pero, por supuesto, Trump y la gente en otros países que utilizan chivos expiatorios no tienen interés en atender las preocupaciones de los agraviados que votaron por ellos, sólo están interesados en explotar esos agravios para servir a sus propios intereses y al interés de una poderosa y rica élite. Ese es el programa de Trump: reducciones de impuestos para los ricos, la eliminación del impuesto sobre bienes, lo que creará una élite permanente que podrá comprar elecciones para asegurar más su poder, por supuesto a expensas de todos los demás; la eliminación de Obamacare, la deportación de inmigrantes ilegales a escala masiva –lo que esperamos sea una fantasía que va a estar más allá de su poder para hacer que suceda. Si Trump se sale con la suya, será capaz de poner a la Corte Suprema en una dirección de la que le llevará décadas recuperarse, si es que eso llega a ser siquiera posible. Él y Ryan, el portavoz de la Cámara de Representantes, quieren enviar a EE.UU. de nuevo a la era del capitalismo del barón ladrón. Pero los cambios radicales que los republicanos podrían hacer podrían ayudar a revertir el declive de los sindicatos o podrían energizar a la izquierda para organizarse y luchar. Lo impresionante es ver las pocas personas que votaron, como si no hubiera nada en juego o como si no hubiera diferencia entre Trump y Clinton. Un artículo en el Times citó a alguien diciendo que no votó porque ninguno de los candidatos dijo que haría algo por él. Yo no podía creerlo. Y había mujeres jóvenes que dijeron que no podían identificarse con Clinton. Por estas razones, entre muchas otras que deben ser igualmente irracionales, hemos elegido a un misógino racista ignorante que nunca ha ocupado un cargo así. Parte del problema parece ser que demasiadas personas parecen pensar en las campañas políticas y cómo se cubren como una forma de entretenimiento, sin sustancia, lo que supongo proviene de la cultura de la celebridad. Chomsky dijo algo muy poderoso pero escalofriante: “Mientras la población en general sea pasiva, apática, desviada hacia el consumismo o hacia el odio a los vulnerables, entonces los poderosos pueden hacer lo que les plazca, y los que sobrevivan contemplarán el resultado.” La cultura de la celebridad es una forma de consumismo, el consumo de personalidades. Esa es la situación en la que estamos –o si no estamos ya dentro de ella, estamos al borde de ella. Por eso los medios de comunicación tratan a Trump como si fuera simplemente una celebridad, no muy diferente de, por ejemplo, Taylor Swift, en lugar de como a alguien a punto de convertirse en la persona más poderosa del mundo, y de quien todos deberíamos tener mucho miedo. Así que la pregunta es qué hacer para que la gente se preocupe, se dé cuenta de que si no toman partido en la política, sus vidas sólo empeorarán; cómo hacer los cambios que van a superar la supresión de los votantes, cómo hacer para que la gente se registre, para que la gente vote. Si Obama está buscando algo qué hacer después de dejar el cargo, ese esfuerzo es algo que podría dirigir. Sé que esto es perfectamente obvio, pero quiero decir estas cosas.

96395_5A.tif

Morgan Fisher, Ideal Fine Grain 120 December 1951, 2011. Archival pigment print. 40.6 x 50.8 cm. Courtesy Bortolami Gallery, New York.

MF7024

Morgan Fisher, Negative Ideal Fine Grain 120 December 1951, 2015. Archival pigment print. 40.6 x 50.8 cm. Cortesía Bortolami Gallery, New York.

TB: ¿Cómo culmina todo esto en la actual crisis de la democracia?

MF: Lo que llamas crisis actual de la democracia, en este país al menos, se debe en gran parte a la indiferencia ante la importancia crucial de estar más informados sobre los temas y tomar partido en la vida política. En parte es una cuestión de que la política sea vista como una extensión de la cultura de la celebridad y en parte es un asunto de chivos expiatorios. ¿Es demasiado decir que estas dos cosas juntas eligieron a Trump? Como ha sido señalado por otros, es absolutamente impactante cómo la cobertura mediática de la elección prestó atención a trivialidades relativas y no a las diferencias en lo que Trump y Clinton defendían. No tengo televisor, así que no sé qué dijo Clinton en la televisión, pero en el Times y en las redes sociales había poco sobre lo que ella defendía que pueda recordar, más allá de ser demócrata. Pero yo sí que sabía lo que Sanders defendía, a pesar de que no obtuvo la atención que Clinton obtuvo. Es más que sorprendente que Trump haya nombrado a Steve Bannon, quien es un portavoz de la supremacía blanca, como su asesor de estrategia, una posición que no está sujeta a confirmación. Un posible escenario es que Trump, con la ayuda de los republicanos en el Congreso, hará tanto daño a las instituciones estadounidenses esenciales, como Medicare, el Seguro Social, los impuestos progresivos, y el derecho a votar, por no hablar de Obamacare, que el electorado reaccionará y devolverá al menos el Senado al control de los demócratas dentro de dos años. Yo sólo espero que entre tanto Trump y las mayorías republicanas no destruyan a EE.UU., por no mencionar otras partes del mundo, o al mundo mismo. Pero tal vez no tendremos que esperar dos años. Existe la posibilidad de que haya suficientes republicanos en el Senado que tengan suficientes principios y consciencia como para comprender lo peligroso que es Trump para instituciones cruciales estadounidenses y para el orden mundial, y se nieguen a votar con otros republicanos para implementar sus programas. Eso requeriría un valor político real, pero me gustaría pensar que es posible.

MF2008_inst_ab_01

Installation view: Morgan Fisher, Door and Window Paintings, Art Basel Unlimited, 2008. Cortesía Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

TB: ¿Cómo comparas hoy en día con los retos nacionales y globales previos que has vivido?

MF: Los retos que he pasado han sido finitos, por lo cual me refiero a que han terminado, por ejemplo, la crisis de los misiles cubana, aunque la raíz de tal crisis y otras que han venido e ido es el excepcionalismo americano. Esto es lo que opina América de sí misma, que no está limitada por los mismo estándares de comportamiento que otros países. Claro que sólo es América siendo una superpotencia sin oposición lo que hace esto posible, lo cual refuerza su poder. Pero han habido crisis por otras razones que han tenido consecuencias duraderas, por ejemplo, el Red Scare al final de los 40s hacia los 50s, que nos dio la lista negra de la industria del entretenimiento y el gobierno de McCarthy.  Y hay condiciones continuas que deberíamos llamar crisis, y se están volviendo cruciales. Como Chomsky ha observado, con el paso de los años ha habido decisiones cercanas a las armas nucleares. Ha habido falsas alarmas, algunas, creo, resultando en decisiones de lanzamiento que fueron desobedecidas sólo porque alguien estaba escéptico sobre la fiabilidad de la alarma. Y bombas han sido extraviadas por accidente. Es una cuestión de suerte que no haya habido desastres, pero la suerte del mundo no puede durar por siempre, y el riesgo sólo aumentará con el incremento en el número de países con capacidad nuclear, sin mencionar la creciente probabilidad de actores deshonestos. Las probabilidades de controlar, dejando fuera una reducción, el esparcimiento de armas nucleares parece, lamento decirlo, muy remotas, no es una imagen alentadora. Y, volviendo a Chomsky, está el cambio climático, que debería ser llamado la catástrofe climática. La opinión de Trump al respecto, eso es una broma, un escándalo, pero hace tres cosas a la vez. Convierte a los chinos en chivo expiatorio, indica a los ricos que él, como ellos, está comprometido con el capitalismo de libre mercado, al punto de estar allí mientras la industria combustible fósil devasta el planeta, e indica a aquellos partidarios que no son ricos, menos educados o evangélicos, que, como ellos, él es anti-elitista, anti-educación, anti-conocimiento, eso es, en contra del conocimiento basado en hechos. Aun si Trump comprometiera a EE.UU. a pelear contra la catástrofe climática e intentara proveer liderazgo para que otros países lo hicieran también, probablemente ya es muy tarde, las probabilidades de acción a escala global que estarían disponibles para reducir su rapidez, ya no detenerlo, son remotas. Así que habrá extinción de masas, agitación en la agricultura, y conforme las áreas costeras se inundan, por ejemplo en Bangladesh, habrá refugiados por el clima, creando una catástrofe humanitaria. Ya hay migración de la África sub-sahariana a Europa que está relacionada con la catástrofe climática.

Tags: , , , ,

Sur Vecino: selección de obras del Acervo Histórico Videobrasil

Ya había explicado esto antes, pero la historia cambia cada vez que la explico de nuevo

Water from the Nile

Ch.ACO 2017, Santiago de Chile