Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Tania Pérez Córdova

by Jennifer Teets

Vis-à-vis a 2011 inquiry of the artist's relatively known text, "Things Above the Ground, Things Below The Ground", Jennifer Teets probes Pérez Córdova's interest in the unearthing and birthing of sculptures, age-acceleration, and the uncertainty of function and form – how do objects perform and within their performance can they duplicate and emerge as another?

Jennifer Teets examina un texto relativamente conocido escrito por Tania Pérez Córdova en el 2011 llamado: “Things Above the Ground, Things Below The Ground”, haciendo énfasis en el interés de la artista por la exhumación de esculturas, la aceleración de procesos de envejecimiento y la incertidumbre de la forma y la función. Así, indaga en la capacidad performática de los objetos y su capacidad de duplicarse.

03.tperezcordova 2
Tania Pérez Córdova, Live chat, 2012, Fluorescent Pelikan marker emptied out in tap water, marker, glass, water, 13 x 7.2 cm

In a 2011 text authored by Mexican artist Tania Pérez Córdova (1979, Mexico City) and commissioned for an online exhibition that I organized for NERO magazine, the artist delves into the curious life of the Coatlicue Mayor, a colossal Aztec Sculpture that was “buried and uncovered repeatedly during a period of more than 500 years”(1). Relaying this peculiar narrative, Pérez Córdova travels across a weave of historical anecdotes. She entangles her readers in the repeated burial and unearthing of the sculpture (including replicas that also were buried), and its spiritual history turned political, but also its systematic transitional life as an object.

She writes: “I will not delve into the Coatlicue symbolism or any of the fascinating tales of religious syncretism that surround the sculpture as these can be found in any history book. Instead, it is the transitions of the object, as if abstracted from history, what interest me more… In some voodoo rituals, objects are dug and later unearthed as a way of loading or unloading them with power. In these ceremonies digging in and digging up is used as a way to change the function, meaning and use of objects. In voodoo, it is believed things could have strong effects from the underground, and so one could be blessed or cursed from below the earth. The Coatlicue monumental sculpture measures more than 2.5 meters in height and weighs over two tons, as much as a small whale or an SUV. In order to get a clearer picture of the monolith tale, I have made a sketch of its episodes above and under the ground, including the replicas that were left on top while the sculpture was removed from man’s sight.” (2)

2
Tania Pérez Córdova, How to use reversed psychology with pictures, 2012-2013, Artificially aged fabric (once black), Linen, 150 x 96 cm

temporarly
Tania Pérez Córdova, Temporarily Magnetized Objects, 2007, silver negative print

As indicated, the artist sketches out a kind of quasi-anthropological timeline of the object’s transited burial life state both above and below ground. Underlining her inquiry with questions such as, “How deep can one bury an object before it is at risk of getting petrified, fossilized or absorbed by the Earth’s strata?” she relates the object’s “quest” to reach the top again, in the sense of a future discovery. It is within revisiting this text that I would like to bring forth a few reflections on Pérez Córdova’s art.

While her work is somewhat known in Mexico City and abroad (it has shown in worldwide fairs and biennials; she’s slotted to exhibit at the 2015 New Museum Triennial in New York City), it has failed to experience flight within critical review. This has occurred for a number of reasons. Pérez Córdova has always had a kind of introverted approach and hermetic style, let alone her communication of it – a significantly different symptomatic than her forefathers. Further, she claims that her work happens between questioning how to make something and how to make sense of something – a process based attitude to making art, which is also atypical to her previous generation. Lastly, her work emerges out of her curiosity and focuses upon the relationship between vision and conviction. While it would be misleading to state that an interest towards popular beliefs are absent in the art of the former, in Pérez-Córdova’s case, the relation between vision and conviction is more tool-like. Pérez Córdova puts materiality into question, not only with materials, but also through them.

5
Tania Pérez Córdova, Things in Pause, 2014, borrowed black piano keys, foam, cardboard

In her text, like in her art, she highlights isolated episodes of visibility and invisibility and peculiar strains of abstraction within an object’s life. For me, she turns to a kind of new animism within her notion of objects and their performativity. Therefore, it is of no surprise that her work How to use reversed psychology with pictures (2012-2013) is an artificially aged piece of linen fabric (once black) in a state of not only material transition, but a passage of vitalities. Pérez Córdova is known to age accelerate or give potency to objects including magnetizing ordinary geometric objects such as with the early work Temporarily Magnetized Objects (2007). These have later appeared in a film where a group of people can be seen touching and passing them around, a kind of invigoration of life force to energize the objects for a purpose we are left to speculate. Appearing like a mentalist experiment where the objects become “charged,” the fabric, in turn “experiences” a fast-forwarded temporal compression, or what we believe of it. Another very simple but poignant work that expresses its material buoyancy in a similar way is Live Chat (2012), a pen that highlights in yellow with the point turned upside down to the interior of a glass of water, leaking and separating over time into two layers. Suffice to say, most of Pérez Córdova’s work holds a visceral temperament that embraces our everyday structures of belief.

Flipping back to her text to think about her preoccupation with time, these written words come to mind: “Man has always been aware that most objects outlast human beings, and that when it comes to preserving them from possible atrocities above ground the safest place to keep things is under the ground. So if the viceroy, on the first discovery of the Coatlicue, did not destroy the monolith, would that mean that he was unconsciously leaving a message for future generations? A time capsule?” (3)

Yet, what if the time capsule were just on pause (like many of the objects of Pérez Córdova)? I’m led to look to her adoration for bastardized, orphaned, and borrowed objects. Again a nod to transition here; all have left imprints or parts of themselves behind, physically, or otherwise contextually. The series titled Things in Pause (2013-present) is a case in point. They are SIM cards embedded in porcelain, shirtsleeves nested in pine wood, a piano key enmeshed in a pictorial composition, an antique decorative frame of an altered shape – each acquiring new lives, each at standstill. These tokens or quasi-objects, as they have been called before, later return to their original place of origin or owners after the exhibition. And if the work is sold, an exchange occurs where the collector must replace the advertised object with an approved substitute – a changeover also implying value. (4)

Titling is also intrinsic to Pérez Córdova’s work. But it does not just encase her objects within language. It reveals otherwise disguised pretenses. It is in the connective tissue between the title and the subject, be it a photograph, action, or sculpture that evidence is portrayed. Whether this evidence be an action or a superstition, the titling is the swinging door that opens up Pérez Córdova’s frame, and it is the way she communicates the otherwise elusive content to her viewers. Here too lies a narrative saturation within the object’s former or future life. Titling is the stepping stone to consider the multivalent life of objects and supersede the expectations of an object’s contained meaning. (5)

010 All the things
Tania Pérez Córdova, All the things, 2014, Brass bronze weight, 10,5 x 11 cm

She continues: “In 1939 Westingtonhouse created one of the first time capsules for the occasion of the World’s Fair, sponsored that year by General Motors and developed around the idea of the future. The trend was to become popular and perhaps nowadays even school assignments would request students to make time capsules of their own. Yet, the 1939 New York time capsule seemed to be, more than a romantic or political act, a real hope to communicate with the future, addressing generations to come as if they were to be completely alien to their own. It included a collection of items mostly selected by a group of Americans, which were supposed to represent the human race and its principal categories of thought, activity and accomplishment. It also included greetings to upcoming societies by Einstein and Thomas Mann. Among the buried objects was a cosmetic make up set by Elizabeth Arden, a guide to the sounds of English words and a woman’s hat designed by Lilly Dache. The capsule is meant to be unearthed in the year 6939. If the request is ensued these objects still have a long way until they reach the top again. One can only speculate if then, a hat could and would still be a hat.” (6)

TPC - for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so - installation view 2 web
Tania Pérez Córdova, Something separated by commas, 2014, Marble, green contact lens, red lipstick, 1,9 x 163,5 x 11cm

Pérez Córdova’s work brings up ontological questions of the object just as her text pinpoints if a hat can still be a hat in the year 6939. This comes through in her bronze works that consider conversion and weight. For example, consider All the things (2014) and 3 or 5 or 4 or nothing (2014) recently made for her exhibition for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so held at Meessen De Clercq in Brussels. She has certain affection or attraction to bronze and brass and replicating objects or their doubles, and proceeds to only exhibit their molds or residues. It is of no surprise that Pérez Córdova’s approach resembles the hindered and entrenched in the work of Trisha Donnelly or the craft and narrative infused work of Lucy Skaer. It is an art that goes beyond language and into that space of conviction, where “not seeing something does not mean that it isn’t there (7).” An attempt to “uncode something in this day and age of a contemporary art ecosystem that is dominated by the eminently readable.”(8)

The series Something separated by commas (2014) comes to mind in this regard and captures Pérez Córdova’s spirit for leftovers – red lipstick like blood smeared into a perfect circle resting on the corner of a thin creamy elongated marble slab facing another elongated slab holding one green contact lens. A duplicate yet slightly different work – a cigarette ashed onto a perfectly circular pattern sitting on the corner of a thin creamy elongated marble slab facing another elongated slab holding one green contact lens. Both sculptures, separated by commas and almost ghostly, appear as if some odd incident just occurred. They just sit there in disturbing silence, staring at us, and I’m encouraged to stare at them too. I wait patiently, reflecting on things below and above the ground, and speculate whether in Pérez Córdova’s time capsule, if a green contact lens could and would still be a green contact lens.

Jennifer Teets is a curator and writer based in Paris.
Tania Pérez Córdova is an artist that lives in Mexico City.

Images courtesy of the artist and Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City, and Meessen de Clercq, Brussels.

Notes

(1) http://www.neromagazine.it/a_clock_that_runs_on_mud/. A physical exhibition also emerged from the virtual exhibition and shares an eponymous title. It was held at Stereo, Poznan from September 2 – October 1, 2011, http://galeriastereo.pl/en/a-clock-that-runs-on-mud.
(2) http://www.neromagazine.it/a_clock_that_runs_on_mud/-/?p=28
(3) http://www.neromagazine.it/a_clock_that_runs_on_mud/-/?p=28
(4) http://artreview.com/opinion/december_2013_opinion_maria_lind_on_going_back_to_basics_art_itself_and_earrings/
(5) Hoptman, Laura. “Trisha Donnelly: Electricity,” Parkett 77, p. 69.
(6) http://www.neromagazine.it/a_clock_that_runs_on_mud/-/?p=28
(7) Hoptman, Laura. “Trisha Donnelly: Electricity,” Parkett 77, p. 69.
(8) Hoptman, Laura. “Trisha Donnelly: Electricity,” Parkett 77, p. 69.

03.tperezcordova 2
Tania Pérez Córdova, Live chat, 2012, marcador fluorescente de marca Pelikan vaciado en agua, marcador, vaso, agua, 13 x 7.2 cm

Un texto escrito por la artista mexicana Tania Pérez Córdova (1979, México DF) comisionado para una exposición en línea que organicé para la revista NERO, en 2011, recorre la curiosa vida de la Coatlicue mayor, una colosal escultura azteca que fue “enterrada y desenterrada repetidamente durante más de 500 años”(1). Al transmitir esta particular narrativa, Pérez Córdova recorre una serie de anécdotas históricas entretejidas y enreda al lector en el repetido enterrar y desenterrar de la escultura (incluidas réplicas también enterradas), destacando su historia espiritual y su devenir político, así como su vida sistemáticamente transicional como objeto.

Escribe: “no me detendré en el simbolismo de la Coatlicue ni en ninguna de las historias fascinantes de sincretismo que rodean la escultura, ya que estas pueden encontrarse en cualquier libro de historia. Son las transiciones del objeto lo que me interesa. Es como si este pudiera ser abstraído de la historia. En algunos rituales vudú, se escarba y luego se desentierran objetos y este proceso es una manera de cargarlos y descargarlos de poder. En estas ceremonias, cavar y desenterrar sirven para cambiar la función, significado y el uso de los objetos. En el vudú se cree que los objetos subterráneos tienen fuertes efectos, así que uno podría recibir bendiciones o maldiciones desde debajo de la tierra. La monumental escultura de Coatlicue mide más de 2.5 metros de alto y pesa más de dos toneladas, tanto como una pequeña ballena o una camioneta. Para tener una imagen más clara de la historia del monolito, he realizado un boceto de sus episodios arriba y debajo de la tierra, incluyendo las réplicas que se dejaron arriba mientras la escultura estaba fuera del alcance de la vista de los hombres (2).”

2
Tania Pérez Córdova, How to use reversed psychology with pictures, 2012-2013, tella envejecido artificialmente (una vez negro), 150 x 96 cm

temporarly
Tania Pérez Córdova, Temporarily Magnetized Objects, 2007, silver negative print

Como lo indica, la artista esboza una línea de tiempo cuasi antropológica del tránsito fúnebre del objeto, tanto arriba como debajo de la tierra. Subrayando su investigación con preguntas como ¿qué tan profundo puede ser enterrado un objeto antes de que se corra el riesgo de que se petrifique, fosilice o sea absorbido por los estratos de la tierra?, la artista relata el ‘esfuerzo’ del objeto por llegar nuevamente a la superficie, en el sentido de un descubrimiento futuro. Me gustaría sacar a la luz nuevas reflexiones sobre el arte de Pérez Córdova a partir de una revisión de este texto.

Aunque su trabajo es un poco conocido en Ciudad de México e internacionalmente (ha sido mostrado en ferias internacionales y bienales y hará parte de la Trienal del New Museum, Nueva York, de 2015), le falta aún despertar interés crítico, por una variedad de razones. Pérez Córdova siempre ha demostrado una especie de posición introvertida y un estilo hermético, que se acentúan con su manera de comunicar su trabajo, que podemos considerar radicalmente distinta a la de sus predecesores. Más aún, según ella su trabajo sucede en el espacio que existe entre cuestionar cómo producir algo y cómo encontrarle el sentido; una forma de hacer arte basada en el proceso que resulta atípica para la generación que la antecedió. Por último, su trabajo surge de su curiosidad y se concentra en la relación entre visión y convicción. Aunque sería errado decir que un interés por las creencias populares está ausente en la generación anterior, en el caso de Pérez Córdova la relación entre visión y convicción resulta más instrumental. Pérez Córdova cuestiona la materialidad no solo con materiales sino a través de ellos.

5
Tania Pérez Córdova, Things in Pause, 2014, teclas de piano negras prestadas, espuma, carton

En su texto, como en su arte, destaca episodios aislados de visibilidad e invisibilidad y tendencias peculiares de abstracción en la vida de un objeto. En mi opinión, su noción de los objetos y su performatividad construye una especie de nuevo animismo. Por lo tanto, no resulta sorprendente que su obra How to use reversed psychology with pictures (2012-2013), que consiste en un pedazo de lino artificialmente envejecido (que alguna vez fue negro), refiere a un estado no solo de transición material, sino a la transmisión de cualidades energéticas. Pérez Córdova es conocida por acelerar el envejecimiento de los objetos o darles poder, incluyendo la magnetización de objetos geométricos cotidianos en su obra temprana Temporarily Magnetized Objects (2007). Estos reaparecieron más adelante en una película donde un grupo de personas aparece manipulándolos y pasándoselos entre sí, vigorizando así su fuerza vital con un propósito acerca del cual solo podemos especular. Apareciendo como un experimento mentalista donde los objetos se “cargan”, la tela, a su vez, “experimenta” una compresión temporal hacia el futuro. Otra obra sencilla pero potente que expresa una destreza material similar es Live Chat (2012), en la que un resaltador amarillo se encuentra en un vaso de agua con la punta invertida. Allí se filtra y separa en dos capas con el tiempo. Sobra decir que la mayoría de obras de Pérez Córdova tienen un temperamento visceral que se envuelve en nuestras creencias cotidianas.

Regresemos a un fragmento de su texto donde trata su preocupación con el tiempo: “el hombre siempre ha sido consciente que la mayoría de objetos duran más que los seres humanos y que, al enfrentar la cuestión de preservarlos de posibles atrocidades sobre la tierra, el lugar más seguro es el subsuelo. Si el virrey, tras el descubrimiento inicial de la Coatlicue, no destruyó el monolito, ¿estaría dejando un mensaje para las generaciones futuras? ¿Una cápsula de tiempo?” (3)

¿Y si esa cápsula de tiempo estuviera en pausa (como sucede con muchos de los objetos de Pérez Córdova)? Pienso en su adoración por objetos bastardos, huérfanos y prestados. De nuevo es un guiño a lo transitorio: todos han dejado huellas o una parte de sí atrás, ya sea física o contextualmente. La serie titulada Things in Pause (2013-presente) es un caso ilustrativo. Son tarjetas SIM insertadas en porcelana, mangas de camisa metidas en madera de pino, una tecla de piano incrustada en una composición pictórica, un marco decorativo antiguo con una forma alterada… cada uno ha adquirido una nueva vida, cada uno está en pausa. Estas señas o cuasi-objetos, como han sido llamados antes, regresan a su lugar de origen o a sus propietarios tras la exposición. Si el trabajo se vende, se da un intercambio donde el coleccionista debe reemplazar el objeto con un sustituto aprobado… un intercambio donde también está implícito el valor (4).

Los títulos son parte intrínseca del trabajo de Pérez Córdova, aunque van más allá de encerrar sus objetos dentro del lenguaje; su papel es revelar pretensiones que, de lo contrario, quedarían disimuladas. Es en el tejido conectivo entre título y objeto, ya sea una fotografía, acción o escultura, donde se muestra la evidencia, que puede ser una acción o una superstición; en todo caso el título es la puerta que oscila y que abre el marco del trabajo de Pérez Córdova, comunicando a los espectadores un contenido que de otra forma resultaría esquivo. Acá también se da una saturación en la vida anterior o futura del objeto. El título es el punto de partida para considerar la vida polivalente de los objetos y para superar las expectativas de los significados contenidos en un objeto (5).

010 All the things
Tania Pérez Córdova, All the things, 2014, peso de láton y bronce, 10,5 x 11 cm

Y continúa: “En 1939 Westingtonhouse creó una de las primeras cápsulas del tiempo con ocasión de la Feria Mundial, patrocinada ese año por General Motors y centrada en la idea del futuro. La tendencia se haría popular y quizás hoy en día incluso los estudiantes hagan sus propias cápsulas como deberes escolares. Sin embargo, la cápsula de tiempo de Nueva York en 1939 parecía incluir, más que un acto romántico o político, una verdadera esperanza de comunicarse con el futuro, interpelando generaciones venideras como si fueran totalmente diferentes. En su interior incluía una colección de objetos en su mayoría seleccionadas por un grupo de estadounidenses que supuestamente representaban la raza humana y sus principales categorías de pensamiento, actividad y logros. También incluía saludos a sociedades futuras de parte de Einstein y Thomas Mann. Entre los objetos enterrados había un set de cosméticos de Elizabeth Arden, una guía sobre los sonidos de las palabras en inglés y un sombrero de mujer diseñado por Lilly Dache. Se planea que la cápsula se desentierre en el año 6939. Si esto se respeta, a estos objetos aún les falta mucho para regresar a la superficie. Uno solo puede especular si, para entonces, un sombrero seguirá siendo un sombrero.” (6)

TPC - for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so - installation view 2 web
Tania Pérez Córdova, Something separated by commas, 2014, marbol, lentes de contacto verdes, lapiz labial rojo, 1,9 x 163,5 x 11cm

La obra de Pérez Córdova despierta preguntas ontológicas alrededor de los objetos, tal y como su texto se cuestiona si un sombrero seguirá siendo un sombrero en 6939. Es algo que transmiten sus obras en bronce, que trabajan con la conversión y el peso. Entre ellas están All the things (2014) y 3 or 5 or 4 or nothing (2014), realizadas recientemente para su exposición for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so en Meessen De Clercq en Bruselas. Tiene cierto afecto o atracción hacia el bronce y el latón y le interesa replicar objetos o a sus dobles. En estas piezas procede a exhibir solo sus moldes o residuos. No resulta sorpresivo que la aproximación de Pérez Córdova se asemeje al interés por la ofuscación en la obra de Trisha Donnelly o a la narrativa y elaboración plástica de Lucy Skaer. Es un arte que existe más allá del lenguaje, en ese espacio de la convicción donde “no ver algo no significa que no esté ahí (7)”. Un intento de “decodificar algo en el actual ecosistema de arte contemporáneo dominado por lo eminentemente legible (8)”. Esto me hace pensar en la serie Something separated by commas (2014), que captura la afinidad de Pérez Córdova por los restos –labial rojo como sangre untado en un círculo perfecto en la esquina de una pieza de mármol alargada, delgada y color crema, enfrentada a otra pieza alargada que sostiene un lente de contacto verde. Y otra pieza duplicada aunque ligeramente diferente: las cenizas de un cigarrillo reunidas en un círculo perfecto en la esquina de una pieza de mármol alargada, delgada y color crema, enfrentada a otra pieza alargada que sostiene un lente de contacto verde. Ambas esculturas, separadas por comas y casi fantasmales, dan la sensación de que algún extraño incidente acabara de ocurrir. Se encuentran sentadas ahí, en un silencio perturbador, mirándonos y alentándome a que las mire de vuelta. Espero con paciencia, reflexionando sobre las cosas que están debajo y encima de la tierra, y especulo si en la cápsula del tiempo de Pérez Córdova un lente de contacto verde podría ser y seguiría siendo un lente de contacto verde.

Jennifer Teets es curadora y escritora, vive en Paris.
Tania Pérez Córdova es artista, vive en la Ciudad de México.

Versión al español de Manuel Kalmanovitz G.

Imagenes cortesía de la artista, Proyectos Monclova, Ciudad de México, y Meessen de Clercq, Bruselas.

Notas

(1) http://www.neromagazine.it/a_clock_that_runs_on_mud/. Una exposición física del mismo título surgió a partir de la virtual y se llevó a cabo en Stereo, Poznan, entre septiembre 2 y octubre 1, 2011, http://galeriastereo.pl/en/a-clock-that-runs-on-mud.
(2) http://www.neromagazine.it/a_clock_that_runs_on_mud/-/?p=28
(3) http://www.neromagazine.it/a_clock_that_runs_on_mud/-/?p=28
(4) http://artreview.com/opinion/december_2013_opinion_maria_lind_on_going_back_to_basics_art_itself_and_earrings
(5) Hoptman, Laura. “Trisha Donnelly: Electricity,” Parkett 77, p. 69.
(6) http://www.neromagazine.it/a_clock_that_runs_on_mud/-/?p=28
(7) Hoptman, Laura. “Trisha Donnelly: Electricity,” Parkett 77, p. 69.
(8) Hoptman, Laura. “Trisha Donnelly: Electricity,” Parkett 77, p. 69.

Tags: , , , ,

Entropías

Rurais

All the water under the bridge, the moon and the stars

Prepared Screen