Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

The Whole Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction at Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, USA

by Lee Escobedo New Orleans, Louisiana, USA 03/22/2018 – 07/22/2018

Exhibition view. The Whole Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction, at Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 2018. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

As US American men were funneled into the European theatre during WWII to breathe their last breathes, the sounds of drums rolled through the homes and factories back home. It was a calling by a country for its women to fill roles once excluded to them by society. Churning at a brutally slow pace for progress, post-war US America finally gave quarter, granting women the flexibility to finally pursue working roles within many spheres, including the arts. As societal shifts often do, pushes for equality and changebroke in waves during the 50’s. The art world was discovering abstraction, influenced by the European surrealists who migrated to the US during pre-war instability. This new artistic form provided the framework for female artists to explore creative freedom. To enter the halls of the Ogden Museum of Art in New Orleans to witness The Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction, is temporary escapism from the sound and fury of US America’s social and moral destabilization. It’s also a reminder of how little ground we’ve made socially since that last great war. Gender imbalance within the arts still fails us all, as men still mostly dictate what’s shown and supported.

The Drum Will Sound brings together artists from the last 80 years under the show’s umbrella of “Southern abstraction”, showing the scope of women’s influence on the movement since the 40’s. The works chosen for the show come from the muscle of the museum’s permanent collection, featuring Margaret Evangeline, Cynthia Brants, Halocyne Barnes, Ruth Atkinson Holmes, Betsy Stewart, Millie Wohl, ValerieJaudon, Vincencia Blount, Shawne Major, Clyde Connell, Sherri Owens, Anastasia Pelias, Jacqueline Humphries, Lin Emery, Minnie Evans, Ashley Teamer, MaPo Kinnord, Marie Hull, Dusti Bongé, Bess Dawson, and Ida Kohlmeyer. Each artist created work through the lens of various decades, reflecting the cultural shifts and discoveries of their respective times. The exhibition traces these shifts within abstraction and lets the ladies take the lead.

Exhibition view. The Whole Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction, at Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 2018. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

The Southern region of the U.S. has been a hotbed of the “isms” that have wrecked this country for centuries. US American Evangelicals have made the South into a voting block for the support of Conservative values, pushing a moral-based platform that marginalizes women, minorities, and the LGBT community. Loosely tying together all these Southern-born female voices, under unifying banners of Abstraction, gender, and region, works as loud, brash resistance.

Although selecting works only from a museum’s permanent collection could lead to limitations, the Ogden has clearly been on the right side of history for decades, amassing a brilliant collection of female artists. There is no need to look beyond the selected artists to understand cautionary tales of equality gone wrong: many of the artists, as many of their contemporaries, battled obscurity, neglect, and sexism throughout their careers. Curator, Bradley Sumrall refers to studying the permanent collection over the last 11 years and finding choice narratives woven through the many abstract works made by womensuch as the way the region has influenced experimentation, playing with Southern symbolism, and the way tough social climate influenced women to rise against challenges for progress.This lends itself to one of the main reasons this exhibition works so well overall. It ignores the easy route of political rhetoric in favor of letting the show speak for itself. Yes, all artists selected are women, but that’s not the only theme at play. The loose unity allows for a consideration of Abstraction’sfluidity in the way it can be interpreted and conveyed. You can find it in the psychedelic 3D zen of Kohlmeyer Rondo #2 (1968), whose soft Rothko inspired hues conceal an insanity inducing infiniteness. Each geometric line draws you into a slightly off-centered crosshair, potentially revealing the viewer to be standing, metaphorically, on not so solid ground. We meet Kohlmeyer again with Signs and Symbols 85-1 (1984), with depicts a map of semiology one might find cruising down the highway. Warped, chunky copies of houses, signs, and structures, are charted together in random accordance.

Ida Kohlmeyer, Rondo #2, 1968, Oil on canvas, Gift of the Ida & Hugh Kohlmeyer Foundation. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

For minorities, the South can be challengingfor success and progress. But as history has shown us, within difficult climates, new ways of thinking, making, and being can arise. The female artists who survived the rigidity found along the South of the United States have been brought together as a testament of endurance. The myths behind Rothko, De Kooning, and Pollock were tied to the overstated male id that drove their free-form brushstrokes. Kohlmeyer and other female artists were working in linear progression with these male icons, developing new techniques and styles.

A standout, Dorothy Hood’s Florence in the Morning (1976) utilizes soft greens and pinks to stain the surface, creating a dream-like horizon line. Floating off-right are two of her totems, icons the artist played around with in various pieces throughout the years. Here the blue forms perform as sidewinding chateus from which to enjoy an Italian sunrise. Or yet, neutral obelisks exist within and outside of the paintings narrative, simply observing. Hood, who has been rediscovered recently herself since her death in 2000, is the rare painter whose work remains idiosyncratic as it is identifiable.

Dorothy Hood, Florence in the Morning, ca. 1976, Oil on canvas, Roger Houston Ogden Collection. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Thankfully, the show is not limited to strictly to painting, it also includes sculptural pieces by Connell, Kinnord, and most notably, Benglis. Over the course of her career, Benglis has been known to integrate ideas of protest into her work,such as her infamous 1974 ArtForum spread where she included a nude image of herself for an upcoming show at Paula Cooper Gallery. For this show at Ogden, bronze, nickel, and chrome are used to maximum the discursive power of the artist. For her piece, Minerva (1986) named after the Greek goddess of war, mimicking the floral shapes and regional iconography of her home state of Louisiana, sharp, pointed sheets of metal are fastened into petal like forms with a knotted middle. Benglis’ silver tumor rejects both decoration and the cold, impotent structures made by male Minimalists. The ugliness is laid bare, reflecting the glamourous-less bayou of her hometown before migrating to NYC.

The relationships between these women, sometimes spanning generations, are key to unlock the heart of the show. Benglis was tutored while at Tulane by Kohlmeyer, who was sisters with Whol; Blount, a native to Atlanta, was a contemporary of Kohlmeyer, while Owens was influenced heavily by Connell. And at the center of this genealogy is Bongé, who has been regulated as a footnote in the male-driven history of Abstract Expressionism. Her work, Circles Penetrated (1952) warps geometric figures upward through circles resembling vortexes. It features bold, angular forms built on a densely textured surface. The title itself can be seen as a cheeky nod towards the phallic symbolism of her male counterparts.

Lynda Benglis, Minerva, 1986, bronze, nickel and chrome, Gift of the Roger Houston Ogden Collection. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Knowing many artists in this exhibition were mentors and students, contemporaries and competitors, points to shared experiences between female artists rebelling against the status quo. If there’s one commonality between the artists threaded throughout the exhibition, it’s revolt. At the time of Abstract Expressionism conception, women were allowed to stake their artistic claim. The Drum Will Soundreveals powerful benchmarks in their progress.

Exhibition view. The Whole Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction, at Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 2018. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

The Whole Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction en Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Nueva Orleans, EUA 

Mientras los hombres estadounidenses eran canalizados al teatro europeo durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial para respirar su último aliento, en casa, los sonidos de tambores redoblaban por los hogares y fábricas. Se trataba de un país haciendo un llamado a sus mujeres para desempeñar papeles alguna vez negados para ellas socialmente. Los Estados Unidos de la posguerra, agitados por un ritmo progesista brutalmente lento, finalmente concedian a las mujeres la flexibilidad para alcanzar roles de trabajo dentro de muchos ámbitos, incluso las artes.  Los esfuerzos por igualdad y cambio, como suele suceder con las transformaciones sociales, se partieron en oleadas durante los años cincuentas. El mundo del arte estaba descubriendo la abstracción influida por los surrealistas europeos que emigraron a los Estados Unidos durante la inestabilidad de los tiempos previos a la guerra. Esta nueva forma artística, generó el contexto para que artistas femeninas exploraran la libertad creativa. Entrar a las galerías del Museo de Arte de Ogden en Nuevo Orleans para ver The Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction, es un escapismo temporal del sonido y la furia de la desestabilización social y moral de los Estados Unidos. También es un testimonio del poco progreso que hemos logrado socialmente desde aquella última gran guerra. La desigualdad de género dentro de las artes es todavía un fracaso para todxs, ya que los hombres aún dictan la mayoría de lo que se exhibe y se apoya.

The Drum Will Sound reúne artistas de los últimos 80 años bajo el término “Southern Abstraction” [Abstracción Sureña] mostrando el ámbito de la influencia de las mujeres en el movimiento desde los años cuarenta. Las obras elegidas para la exposición vienen del núcleo de la colección permanente del museo, incluyendo a Margaret Evangeline, Cynthia Brants, Halocyne Barnes, Ruth Atkinson Holmes, Betsy Stewart, Millie Wohl, Valeria Jaudon, Vincencia Blount, Shawne Major, Clyde Connell, Sherri Owens, Anastasia Pelias, Jacqueline Humphries, Lin Emery, Minnie Evans, Ashley Teamer, MaPo Kinnord, Marie Hull, Dusti Bongé, Bess Dawson and Ida Kohlmeyer. Cada artista creó obras a través del lente de varias décadas, reflejando los cambios culturales y los descubrimientos de sus respectivos tiempos. La exposición rastrea estos cambios dentro de la abstracción y permite que las mujeres tomen la delantera.

Exhibition view. The Whole Drum Will Sound: Women in Southern Abstraction, at Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 2018. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

La región sureña de los Estados Unidos ha sido un semillero para los “ismos” que han arruinado este país durante siglos. Evangelistas estadounidenses han convertido el sur en un bloque de votación para el apoyo  de valores conservadores, empijando una platforma de bases moralistas que marginaliza a mujeres, minorías y a la comunidad LGBT+. Ante ello, vincular vagamente todas estas voces femeninas, bajo estandartes unificadores de abstracción, género, y región, funciona como una resistencia fuerte y audaz.

Aunque elegir obras exclusivamente de la colección permanente de un museo podría ser restrictivo, el Ogden claramente ha estado del lado correcto de la historia durante décadas, reuniendo una colección impresionante de artistas femeninas. No hay necesidad de mirar más allá de las artistas seleccionadas para entender historias admonitorias de la igualdad que resultaron mal: muchas de las artistas están luchando contra la obscuridad, el abandono, y el sexismo a lo largo de sus carreras. El curador Bradley Sumrall al estudiar la colección permanente durante los últimos 11 años, refiere haber encontrado selectas narrativas tejidas a través de los muchos trabajos abstractos hechos por mujeres como la forma en que la región ha influido en la experimentación, al jugar con el simbolismo sureño, y la forma en que el difícil clima social influyó en las mujeres para levantarse en contra de los retos para el progreso. Esto se presta a una de las razones principales por las cuales esta exposición funciona tan bien en general: ignora la ruta fácil de la retórica política en favor de permitir que la exposición hable por si misma. Sí, todas las artistas elegidas son mujeres, pero ese no es el único tema en juego. La unidad imprecisa permite una consideración de la fluidez de la abstracción en la forma en que puede ser interpretada y difundida. Este fluidez puede ser encontrada en el psicodélico zen 3D de Kohlmeyer Rondo #2 (1968), cuyas tonalidades suaves inspiradas por Rothko ocultan una locura que induce a la infinidad. Cada línea geométrica te acerca a una retícula ligeramente descentrada, que potencialmente revela al espectador que éste se encuentra en pie, metafóricamente, en tierra no tan sólida. Encontramos de nuevo a Kohlmeyer con Signs and Symbols 85-1 (1984), la cual representaun mapa semióticoque uno podría encontrar viajando por la carretera. Gruesas y deformadas copias de casas, señales, y estructuras, son reunidas en orden aleatorio.

Ida Kohlmeyer, Rondo #2, 1968, Oil on canvas, Gift of the Ida & Hugh Kohlmeyer Foundation. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Para las minorías, el sur puede ser desafío en cuanto a éxito y progreso. Pero, como la historia nos ha mostrado, en contextos difíciles, nuevas maneras de pensar, hacer y ser pueden surgir. Las artistas femeninas que sobrevivieron la rigidez que se encuentra a lo largo del sur de los Estados Unidos han sido reunidas como un testimonio de resistencia. Los mitos detrás de Rothko, De Kooning, y Pollock fueron atados a la exagerada identidad masculina que impulsó sus pinceladas espontáneas. Kohlmeyer y otras artistas femeninas estaban trabajando en progresión lineal con estos íconos masculinos, desarrollando nuevas técnicas y estilos.

Una obra destacada, Florence in the Morning (1976) de Dorothy Hood utiliza suaves verdes y rosas para teñir la superficie, creando una ilusoria línea del horizonte. Flotando erradamente se encuentran dos de sus tótems, íconos con los que la artista jugaba en varias obras a lo largo de los años. Aquí las formas azules funcionan como castillos serpenteantes desde donde disfrutar de un amanecer italiano. O aún, obeliscos neutrales, existen dentro y fuera de la narrativa de la pintura, sencillamente observando. Hood, quien ha sido redescubierta recientemente desde su muerte en 2000, es la extraña pintora cuyo trabajo permanece tan idiosincrático como identificable.

Dorothy Hood, Florence in the Morning, ca. 1976, Oil on canvas, Roger Houston Ogden Collection. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Afortunadamente, la exposición no se limita exclusivamente a la pintura, también incluye piezas escultóricas por Connell, Kinnord, y en particular, Benglis. En el transcurso de su carrera, Benglis ha sido conocida por integrar ideas de protesta en su trabajo, como su infame desplegado en ArtForumen 1974 donde incluyó una desnudo de ella misma para una exhibición individual en la galería Paula Cooper. Para la exhibición en el Ogden, el bronce, el níquel, y el cromo son usados para maximizar la potencia discursiva de la artista. Para su obra, Minerva (1986) llamada así por la diosa griega de la guerra, láminas de metal afiladas y puntiagudas son atadas para formar pétalos con un centro enredado, imitando las formas florales y la iconografía regional de su estado natal de Luisiana. El bulto plateado de Benglis rechaza los aspectos decorativos y la frialdad del minimalismo masculino. Deja lo feo al descubierto, reflejando el pantano falto de glamor de su pueblo natal antes de emigrar a Nueva York.

Las relaciones entre estas mujeres, a veces durante generaciones, son imprescindibles para revelar el núcleo de la exposición. Benglis recibió clases en Tulane por parte de Kohlmeyer, quien era hermana de Whol; Blount, nacida en Atlanta, era contemporánea de Kohlmeyer mientras que Owens fue influenciada considerablemente por Connell. Al centro de esta genealogía está Bongé, quien ha sido regulada como una nota al pie en la historia del expresionismo abstracto conducida por el ego masculino. Su trabajo, Circles Penetrated (1952) deforma figuras geométricas a través de círculos que remiten a vórtices. Incluye atrevidas formas angulares que se construyen sobre una superficie densamente texturizada. El título en sí mismo puede ser entendido como un indiscreto guiño hacia el simbolismo fálico de sus contrapartes masculinas.

Lynda Benglis, Minerva, 1986, bronze, nickel and chrome, Gift of the Roger Houston Ogden Collection. Image courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Al saber que muchas artistas en esta exhibición fueron mentores y estudiantes, contemporáneas y competidoras, señala a las experiencias compartidas entre artistas femeninas que se rebelan contra el status quo. Si hay algo en común entre las artistas que abarca esta exhibición, es la revuelta. En el momento del origen del expresionismo abstracto, se le permitió a las mujeres enunciar su demanda artística. The Drum Will Sound revela poderosos referentes de progreso.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

haha

Please have enough acid in the dish!

MARGINALIA #4

“POSIÇÃO AMOROSA” (“AMOROUS POSITION”)