Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Rosana Paulino: The Sewing of Memory, at Pinacoteca de São Paulo, Brazil

By Amanda Carneiro São Paulo, Brazil 12/08/2018 – 03/04/2019

Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória. Installation view at Pinacoteca de São Paulo, December 8, 2018 – March 4, 2019. Photo credit: Isabella Matheus / Pinacoteca. Image courtesy of Pinacoteca de São Paulo

Given the extraordinary and consistent artistic production of Rosana Paulino, now on display at the Pinacoteca del Estado de Sāo Paulo, it seems reasonable to question why it took so long to be able to enjoy a monographic exhibition of the artist in a grand Brazilian institution. The exhibiton, extensive, goes through her work of the nineties—when the artist produced drawings that were rarely exhibited—until her most recent series, made in 2018, based on different techniques of image reproduction. The curatorship of Valéria Piccoli and Pedro Nery refutes chronological schemes in favor of a thematic arrangement, highlighting the diverse unfolding of Paulino’s research. It is a gift for the city, as were other exhibitions held in 2018 [1], a year that the artist described as “the 1922 week of Afro-Brazilian art”, referencing the background of the Brazilian modernist movement and the substantial number of exhibitions dedicated to black artists.

If at the beginning of the 20th century, Brazilian art was exhibited accompanied by what Gayatri Spivak classified as “epistemic violence” [2]—transforming the black population into a spectator of something that was and was not its own existence—gradually, feminisms, black activism, dissident identities, indigenous cultures, sexualities, and singular and plural genders, enter, with denunciating force, the institutional circuits, now crossed by the struggle of subalternized groups that have long questioned the prevalence of hegemonic perspectives in the history of art, challenging visual conventions and the qualification and valorization patterns for artists. For this reason, the production of Rosana Paulino acquires importance, since the artist deals with discussions of gender and race, simultaneously, in a careful artistic endevour that does not distinguish form of content. In the different supports and languages—from engravings and transfers, to drawings, sculptures and installations—, it is possible to observe the perennial relationship of the artist with the processes of classification, mapping and interpretation, even referring to a kind of cartography of black bodies—especially of women—, opposing projects of scientific rationalism when registering complex subjectivities. Her persistence in exhibiting such images seems to reveal to the public the ideological rules under which the production operates, circulation and reception of art, in a complex network of various power interactions operated through visual culture.

Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória. Installation view at Pinacoteca de São Paulo, December 8, 2018 – March 4, 2019. Photo credit: Isabella Matheus / Pinacoteca. Image courtesy of Pinacoteca de São Paulo

For this reason, it is important to print the genealogy of the artist in the history of art, giving the exhibiton’s first room a strong personal dimension. In the work Parede da memória (1994-2015)—donated to the collection of the Pinacoteca in the context of the exhibition Territórios: Artistas Afrodescendentes no Acervo da Pinacoteca [3], there is a large series of patuás [4] reproducing images of Rosana Paulino’s family, as amulets to be carried in the body and at the service of memory, assuming a broad and self-determined notion of individuality. Next to this work is the series Bastidores, which reproduces images of women having parts of their cheeks—throat, mouth and eyes—sutured: a violent image of castration and silencing. While the first inscribes presence, the second reveals processes of physical and psychic destitution.

Such oppositions continue during different moments of the show, although the other two rooms effusively resume the relationship of Paulino’s production with topics linked to biologizing processes. In principle, the relationship with the universe of animal taxonomy feeds her drawing exercises, as is the case with the Estudo de peixe, Estudo de lizard and Estudo de morcego (all from 1993). At the same time, it divides the space with the installation Tecelãs (2003) as if leaning over the animal world would lead to the understanding of the powerful processes of transformation of the silk wrappers into butterflies, a metaphor for the transmutation of an exposed female subjectivity.

Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória. Installation view at Pinacoteca de São Paulo, December 8, 2018 – March 4, 2019. Photo credit: Isabella Matheus / Pinacoteca. Image courtesy of Pinacoteca de São Paulo

Consecutively, the biological knowledge as an instrument for the subalternization of non-European populations becomes explicit to be able to denaturalize it. In História Natural?, for example, pages of books reproduce panels of Portuguese tiles that serve as a backdrop, first the shaded outline totally depersonalizes a black woman, and then, marking the boundaries between images by a red line, the same feminine figure is presented in its entirety when unveiling the transparency that conceals it and that contains the most classic reference to the slave trade of the image of slave ships used by Thomas Clarkson [5] in his abolitionist campaigns. The page is the same, but the superposition between them, a reference to the interlaced stories, reveals hidden narratives that affirms the need to understand the unnaturalness of those colonial facts.

Not by accident, the series A geometria à brasileira chega ao paraíso tropical (2018) provocatively announces the association between primary colors—which fill basic geometric forms—, and the iconography of scientific racism indicating the possibility of criticizing formalism. The work takes up, in a circumstantial way, the already present theme in the 1990s’ drawings of the artist, reaffirming the inseparability of form and content.

The exhibition Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória closes with an print of the series Assentamento in relation to the adjacent exhibition Trabalho de artista: imagem e autoimagem (1826-1929), suggesting a reflection on the representation and inscription of stories that are eclipsed and misdirected today in Brazilian society. In this way, art is corroborated as an important discursive and iconographic vector, also capable of resisting the prevalence of hegemonic readings.

Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória. Installation view at Pinacoteca de São Paulo, December 8, 2018 – March 4, 2019. Photo credit: Isabella Matheus / Pinacoteca. Image courtesy of Pinacoteca de São Paulo

By mapping the constitution of complex subjectivities in relation to a scientific rationalism, the artist rejects, both, the simplistic presumption that we are imprisoned in the past, and the suggestion that history is all we make of it. “The constitution of societies is entangled to dimensions of power; however, the power itself is not so transparent as to make its understanding superfluous. The last seal of power may be its invisibility, but the obstacle to be transposed is the exposure of its roots.” [6]

To the attentive eyes, the criticism presented by the works of the artist points out ways to assume how the construction of the differences resulted in the production of inequalities. Subverting from inside the white cube, Rosana Paulino makes explicit the dimensions of authority connected to it. Is it her determination to deal with issues that are so costly and, at the same time, so neglected by Brazilian art and society the reason for our long wait?

[1] The Museum of Art of São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand (MASP) held a series of exhibitions and public programs titled Afro-Atlantic Histories, with a homonymous exhibition, as well as monographic exhibitions of María Auxiliadora, Aleijadinho, Emanoel Araújo, Melvin Edwards, Rubén Valentín, Sonia Gomes, Lucia Laguna, Pedro Figari. The SESC Ribeirão Preto gave place to Pretatitud – Emergencia, Insurgencia, Afirmación and the occupation program of Itaú Cultural was dedicated to the trajectory of Ilê Aiyê, among others. There is also a greater participation of black artists in collective exhibitions and, although in smaller numbers, also as curators.

[2] Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Pode o subalterno falar? (Editora UFMG, 2010).

[3] The exhibition, with the curatorship of Tadeu Chiarelli, took place between December 2015 and June 2016 at the Pinacoteca del Estado de São Paulo.

[4] In the Candomblé culture, the patuá is a consecrated object that contains within itself the axé, the magical force of the Orixá, of the saint or light guide, to whom the object is consecrated.

[5] Thomas Clarkson (1760-1846) was an English abolitionist who led the campaign against the slave trade in England in the early nineteenth century.

[6] Luis Camnitzer, La enseñanza del arte como fraude. Simpósio Terceira Margem: educação para a arte/arte para a educação. Porto Alegre, v. 11, 2007.

Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória. Vista de instalación en Pinacoteca de São Paulo, 8 de diciembre, 2018 – 4 de marzo, 2019. Fotografía: Isabella Matheus / Pinacoteca. Imagen cortesía de Pinacoteca de São Paulo

Ante la extraordinaria y consistente producción artística de Rosana Paulino, ahora en exhibición en la Pinacoteca del Estado de São Paulo, parece razonable cuestionar por qué tardó tanto que fuese posible disfrutar de una exposición monográfica de la artista en una gran institución brasileña. La muestra, panorámica, transita entre trabajos de los años noventas —cuando la artista produjo dibujos entonces poco exhibidos—, hasta sus series más recientes, realizadas en 2018 a partir de diferentes técnicas de reproducción de imagen. La curaduría de Valéria Piccoli y Pedro Nery refuta esquemas cronológicos en favor de una disposición temática, destacando los diversos desdoblamientos de la investigación de Paulino. Es un regalo para la ciudad, como fueron otras muestras realizadas en 2018 [1], año que la artista calificó como “la semana de 1922 del arte afro-brasileño”, en referencia al marco del movimiento modernista brasileño y al expresivo número de exposiciones dedicadas a artistas negrxs.

Si a comienzos del siglo XX, el arte brasileño se exhibía acompañado de lo que Gayatri Spivak clasificó como “violencia epistémica” [2]—transformando a la población negra en espectadora de algo que era y no era su propia existencia—, paulatinamente, feminismos, activismos negros, identidades disidentes, culturas indígenas, sexualidades y géneros plurales y en primera persona, adentran, con fuerza de denuncia, los circuitos institucionales, ahora atravesados por la lucha de grupos subalternizados que desde hace mucho cuestionan la prevalencia de perspectivas hegemónicas en la historia del arte, desafiando convenciones visuales y los patrones de calificación y valorización de los artistas. Por ello, la producción de Rosana Paulino adquiere importancia, ya que la artista trata discusiones de género y raza, simultáneamente, en un cuidadoso quehacer artístico que no distingue forma de contenido. En los soportes y lenguajes diversos —de los grabados y de las calcomanías, a los dibujos, esculturas e instalaciones—, es posible observar la perenne relación de la artista con los procesos de clasificación, mapeo e interpretación, llegando a remitir a una especie de cartografía de cuerpos negros —sobre todo de las mujeres—, contraponiendo proyectos de racionalismo cientificista al inscribir subjetividades complejas. Su persistencia en exhibir tales imágenes parece querer revelar al público las reglas ideológicas bajo las cuales operan la producción, circulación y recepción de arte, en una red compleja de varias interacciones de poder operadas por medio de la cultura visual.

Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória. Vista de instalación en Pinacoteca de São Paulo, 8 de diciembre, 2018 – 4 de marzo, 2019. Fotografía: Isabella Matheus / Pinacoteca. Imagen cortesía de Pinacoteca de São Paulo

Por esa razón es importante imprimir en la historia del arte la genealogía de la artista, dotando la primera sala de la exposición de una fuerte dimensión personal. En el trabajo Parede da memória (1994-2015) —donada a la colección de la Pinacoteca en el contexto de la exposición Territórios: Artistas Afrodescendentes no Acervo da Pinacoteca [3]— se ve una gran serie de patuás [4] que reproducen imágenes de la familia de Rosana Paulino, como amuletos a ser cargados en el cuerpo y al servicio de la memoria, asumiendo una amplia y autodeterminada noción de individualidad. Al lado de ese trabajo, está expuesta la serie Bastidores, en la cual son reproducidas imágenes de mujeres teniendo partes de sus mejillas —garganta, boca y ojos— suturadas: una violenta imagen de castración y silenciamiento. Mientras la primera inscribe presencia, la segunda revela procesos de destitución física y psíquica.

Tales oposiciones continúan en diferentes momentos de la muestra, aunque las otras dos salas retoman efusivamente la relación de la producción de Paulino con temas ligados a procesos biologizantes. En principio, la relación con el universo de la taxonomía animal alimenta sus ejercicios de dibujos, como es el caso con los Estudo de peixe, Estudo de lagartos y Estudo de morcego (todos de 1993). Al mismo tiempo divide el espacio con la instalación Tecelãs (2003), como si el inclinarse sobre el mundo animal llevara al entendimiento de los potentes procesos de transformación de los envoltorios de seda en mariposas, una metáfora de la transmutación de una subjetividad femenina expuesta.

Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória. Vista de instalación en Pinacoteca de São Paulo, 8 de diciembre, 2018 – 4 de marzo, 2019. Fotografía: Isabella Matheus / Pinacoteca. Imagen cortesía de Pinacoteca de São Paulo

Sucesivamente, el conocimiento biológico como instrumento para la subalternización de poblaciones no europeas se hace explícito para desnaturalizarlo. En el trabajo História Natural?, por ejemplo, páginas de libros reproducen paneles de azulejos portugueses que sirven como telón de fondo; primero, el contorno sombreado totalmente despersonaliza a una mujer negra, y después, marcando los límites entre imágenes por una línea roja, la misma figura femenina es presentada en su totalidad cuando se desvela la transparencia que la encubre y que figura la más clásica referencia al tráfico de esclavos de la imagen de embarcaciones de esclavos utilizada por Thomas Clarkson [5] en sus campañas abolicionistas. La página es la misma, pero la superposición entre ellas, una referencia a las historias entrelazadas, revela narrativas ocultas como quien afirma la necesidad de comprender la no naturalidad de esos hechos coloniales.

No al azar, la serie A geometria à brasileira chega ao paraíso tropical (2018) anuncia de forma provocadora la asociación entre colores primarios —que llenan formas geométricas básicas—, y la iconografía del racismo científico indicando la posibilidad de crítica al formalismo. La obra retoma, aunque de forma indiciaria, el tema ya presente en los dibujos de la artista de la década de 1990, reafirmando la inseparabilidad de forma y contenido.

La exposición Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória cierra con un grabado de la serie Assentamento en relación a la exposición contigua Trabalho de artista: imagem e autoimagem (1826-1929), sugiriendo una reflexión sobre la representación e inscripción de historias que hoy se eclipsan y son mal dirigidas en la sociedad brasileña. De esta forma se corrobora el arte como importante vector discursivo e iconográfico, también capaz de resistir la prevalencia de lecturas hegemónicas.

Rosana Paulino: a costura da memória. Vista de instalación en Pinacoteca de São Paulo, 8 de diciembre, 2018 – 4 de marzo, 2019. Fotografía: Isabella Matheus / Pinacoteca. Imagen cortesía de Pinacoteca de São Paulo

Al mapear la constitución de subjetividades complejas en relación a un racionalismo cientificista, la artista rechaza tanto la presunción simplista de que estamos encarcelados en el pasado, como la insinuación de que la historia es todo lo que hacemos de ella. “La constitución de las sociedades está intrincada a dimensiones de poder, sin embargo, el poder mismo no es tan transparente como para hacer su comprensión superflua. El último sello del poder puede ser su invisibilidad; pero el obstáculo a ser transpuesto es la exposición de sus raíces.” [6]

A los ojos atentos, la crítica presentada por los trabajos de la artista nos señalan caminos para asumir cómo la construcción de las diferencias resultaron en la producción de las desigualdades. Subvirtiendo desde el interior del cubo blanco, Rosana Paulino hace explícitas las dimensiones de autoridad conectadas a éste. ¿Será su determinación de tratar temas tan costosos y, al mismo tiempo, tan descuidados por el arte y la sociedad brasileña la razón de nuestra larga espera?

[1] En el Museo de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand (MASP) se realizó el ciclo de exposiciones y programas públicos titulado Historias Afro-atlánticas, con una muestra homónima, además de monográficas de María Auxiliadora, Aleijadinho, Emanoel Araújo, Melvin Edwards, Rubén Valentín, Sonia Gomes, Lucia Laguna, Pedro Figari. El SESC Ribeirão Preto dio lugar a Pretatitud – Emergencia, Insurgencia, Afirmación y el programa de ocupación del Itaú Cultural se dedicó a la trayectoria del Ilê Aiyê, entre otras. Se nota también una mayor participación de artistas negros en exposiciones colectivas y, aunque en menor número, también como curadores.

[2] Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Pode o subalterno falar? (Editora UFMG, 2010.)

[3] La exposición, con la curaduría de Tadeu Chiarelli, ocurrió entre diciembre de 2015 y junio de 2016 en la Pinacoteca del Estado de São Paulo.

[4] En la cultura Candomblé, el patuá es un objeto consagrado que trae en sí el axé, la fuerza mágica del Orixá, del santo o guía de luz, a quien el objeto es consagrado.

[5] Thomas Clarkson (1760-1846) fue un inglés abolicionista que lideró la campaña en contra del tráfico de esclavos en Inglaterra a comienzos del siglo XIX.

[6] Luis Camnitzer, La enseñanza del arte como fraude. Simpósio Terceira Margem: educação para a arte/arte para a educação. Porto Alegre, v. 11, 2007.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The Witch’s Cradle

10 Mythical Exhibitions from Latin America that Millennials Never Got to See — Part II

Adiós Utopia: Dreams and Deceptions in Cuban Art Since 1950 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Lanza del Norte