Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Monarchs: Brown and Native Contemporary Artists in the Path of the Butterfly, at Bemis Center, Omaha, Nebraska

By Melinda Kozel Omaha, Nebraska, USA 12/07/2017 – 02/24/2018

Salvador Jimenez-Flores, Nopales híbridos: An Imaginary World of a Rascuache-Futurism, 2017. Terra-cotta, porcelain, underglazes, gold luster and terra-cotta slip. 96 x 96 x 96 inches. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Colin Conces

The Bemis Center of Contemporary Arts debuted Monarchs: Brown and Native Contemporary Artists in the Path of the Butterfly this last winter in Omaha, Nebraska. The exhibit, curated by Risa Puleo—the first to hold title as Curator-in-Residence at the Bemis Center—seeks to address the contemporary result of a long and woven history of movement, as told through themes of migrations, inheritance, and transformation.

Monarchs celebrates the full breadth of what indigenous and migrant populations brought to this country and how their contemporary descendants create inspired art that honors a tradition of craft and ceremony while looking forward and setting the tone for a new sense of tradition.

In the first gallery we find those artists who focused on migration amplified more than just the literal journey at hand. While Wendy Red Star and Francisco Souto referenced the topographical, tourist and community-pride-related landmarks that chronicle the experience of indigenous populations others like Cannupa Hanska Lugar, Marty Two Bulls, Jr and William Cordova saw this path lead to immobilization. Whether displaced by colonialism or deportation or trapped by rising alcoholism and poverty this experience is illustrated by a collection of debris from consumerist surroundings is embellished with feathers and ceramic glaze—the faint traces of a culture buried under the weight of vice and exploitation while still trying to uphold distinction.

Installation view: (left) Natalie Ball, Battlefield Medicine Flags, 2015. Tanned deer hide, powwow competition number, US military jacket, wool, powwow shawl, willow branches, river rocks. Dimension variable; (right) Juan William Chavez, Potato Mound Sound, 2017. Mixed media. 120 x 108 x 48 inches. Courtesy the artists. Photo: Colin Conces

Additionally, this idea of displacement reiterates the inspiration of the butterfly. The journey that has been made doesn’t account for literal boundaries. When the land belongs to you—as is reinforced in these artists’ cultural philosophy—you are the monarch of that land and you have the right to reclaim it. So, when these artists speak of migration, at times it reflects a migration and displacement forced by neocolonialism to impose capitalist interests. As we’ve watched people who are part of our country, in every sense of the word, be deported or have land seized for pipelines, we realize that the systems that decided the existence of brown and native persons were an inconvenience are still assigning value based on what the system has to gain.

The monarch butterfly, in fact, as a species attempts a 3,000-mile journey from Mexico to Canada twice a year but it is always a different generation of butterflies from those which started this trip that have to complete it. In much the same way, the experience of the populations of people who make these treks does not end where they settle. The journeys of native communities and immigrant people evolve over time as their personal stories, common history, identities and culture are passed down and enhanced by the experience of those that come after. For example, we cannot simply describe people from Mexico as having one set of interests or aesthetics as they are continually representing and reinventing themselves according to their circumstances in new and profound ways. We look at the past, present and future of Mexico and its people to understand who they are.

Following Margarita Cabrera’s swarm of copper butterflies that literally fly one room to another, the second gallery greets artists representing ideas of inheritance who amplify the idea of building on their past into the present. Their work utilizes symbolism, style and material that highlights a cultural memory as it applies to contemporary experience. Craft and trade—a stronghold of economic history for these populations—reinforce an awareness of what is lost over time. Artists such as Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez and Harold Mendez honor the labor and technique that built their history using ritual, technology and abstraction and present a new idea of what native history is and means in the current sociopolitical context of the US. A clear example of this is the sarapes by Ivan Lozano composed of digital images and assemblages of geographically specific dirt showing us that history is constantly in the making.

Jeffrey Gibson, Like A Hammer, 2016. Mixed media installation: robe (canvas, wool, artificial sinew, glass beads, tin and metal jingles, nylon fringe) and drum (wood, rawhide, acrylic paint). 78 1⁄2 x 35 x 12 1⁄2 inches. Courtesy the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles. Photo: Colin Conces

Finally, the artists who examined transformation were inspired by ritual and ceremony as an impetus to the idea of the journey we make as people—as a culture—by how our past and present affect our ability to grow and engage.

Many of these artists also used traditional craft and textile in their work, as performance and experience diverge from shared ideas of fear, grief and control. Work by Omaha artist Sarah Rowe, Soil depicted a series of handkerchiefs all stained with a ring of oil in such a uniform way it gives the impression that the oil was on the embroidery hoop to begin. This piece helped me understand that a history laced with oppression or displacement always leaves an indelible mark that will impact you profoundly no matter what you try to do. This imprint becomes inherited or even instinctual.

Interestingly, the idea of record-keeping was prominent; not only as literal documents and a way of measuring time and experience, as in the case of the rainbow archive Map Pointz of Guadalupe Rosales around 90s Latino party crew and rave scene in LA, but also as the living reminder what this history means for the future, as in happens in Josh Rios and Anthony Romero’s Is Our Future a Thing of the Past? around Chicanx futurism.

Installation view: Harold Mendez & Ronny Quevedo, Specter field (After Vicabamba), 2015. Linoleum tiles, gold and silver leaf, fiberglass mesh, spray enamel, graphite, charcoal, black silicone carbide, marking chalk, carnations, water, peanut oil, oxidized copper reproduction of a pre-Columbian death mask from the Museo del Oro (Bogota, Colombia). Dimension variable; Truman Lowe, Waterfall, 1993. Pine. 74 x 72 x 67 inches; Ivan Lozano, Un Sarape (A Palimpsest) 001, 002 & 003, 2017. Packing tape, photo transfers from color laser prints, acrylic rod, copper, rope. 67 3⁄4 x 46 x 1 3⁄4 inches. Courtesy the artists. Photo: Colin Conces

As the legacy of our interaction with migrant or indigenous groups accrues treatises, proclamations, laws and bans, the story of division and arrangement becomes a backdrop for the way these populations have experienced history in the country we shared. The words of the various treaties displayed in the installation Broken Treaty Quilts by Gina Adams illustrate the indelible mark of oppression and marginalization that these actions leave in the legacy of these communities and the way their lives are affected from that point forward. If a quilt is literally the assemblage of multiple pieces and stitches, the historic quilts of the experiences of black and brown communities are constructed by the multitude of its components, a big part of which are not their decision.

Contrasting the more traditional medium of quilting, video played a prominent role in many artists’ work. Videos place the artist or their subject at the center of the work forcing you to see them and their humanity for what it is and not a packaged representation of a vast culture build for hegemonic means. Donna Huanca’s piece, Dressing the Queen follows the layering of many articles of clothing and fabrics on a woman to the point where her face is barely seen then subsequently stripped from her. I imagine the responsibility of having to represent a culture, a race, a religion, a gender or philosophy feels to be such a weight that it feels that you don’t matter as a person—it only matters how others can gather a narrative from you. Soon after, the audience that was captivated by your exoticism and struggle has moved on and you are left, once again, on your own.

Monarchs: Brown and Native Contemporary Artists in the Path of the Butterfly offers something that people in Nebraska may not fully realize: the idea that First Nations people and Latinx citizens and immigrants exist beyond a history textbook, a talking point or a political target. At the same time, the exhibition evidences how we often nobilize a rich culture and its historic contribution, such as Native American’s, to condense it into a packaged identity that homogenizes and devaluates the plurality and diversity that characterizes these cultures.

Donna Huanca, Dressing the Queen (Pachamama), 2009–2010. Video, silent. 11:33 mins looped. Courtesy Peres Projects, Berlin

Much like the monarch butterfly, the journey that defines the existence of the communities that this exhibition fosters, is complicated, persistent, transformative, fragmented and a little bit of a miracle. They can’t do it alone, it doesn’t stop with them and they will always come out the other side changed, a transformation that never stops. What I get from this represented journey, as someone that has never experienced this reality, is the ability to understand the dichotomy of value and struggle that this complicated legacy represents to immigrants and First Nation communities.

The monarch butterfly serves as a living embodiment of the connectivity we have as people. The indigenous cultures in our country crossed boundaries to fulfill an intrinsic purpose and they have depended on each other to fully realize that purpose. The disruption of their natural surroundings and the threat to their cultural identity still persists as environmental, civil and human rights remain a vivid target. How we honor their paths connects greatly with how we understand our responsibility in preserving their tradition, lifting their voices and being stewards to the land.

 

Melinda Kozel is an art historian and art educator based in Omaha. Nebraska. She is a candidate for the Learning Community Council of Omaha for the Subcouncil District 3.

Salvador Jimenez-Flores, Nopales híbridos: An Imaginary World of a Rascuache-Futurism, 2017. Terra-cotta, porcelain, underglazes, gold luster and terra-cotta slip. 96 x 96 x 96 inches. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Colin Conces

El Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Bemis inauguró el invierno pasado en Omaha, Nebraska, Monarchs: Brown and Native Contemporary Artists in the Path of the Butterfly. La exhibición, curada por Risa Puleo —la primera en ostentar el título de Curadora en Residencia en el Centro Bemis— busca abordar el resultado contemporáneo de una larga y entramada historia de movimiento contada a través de temas de migraciones, herencia y transformación.

Monarchs celebra la amplitud total de aquello que las poblaciones indígenas y migrantes trajeron al mundo y cómo sus descendientes contemporáneos crean arte que honra una tradición de artesanía y ceremonia mientras esperan y sientan las bases para un nuevo sentido de tradición.

En la primera sala encontramos a aquellos artistas que enfocados en la migración amplificaron más que sólo el viaje literal en cuestión. Mientras Wendy Red Star y Francisco Souto referencian los hitos topográficos, turísticos y aquellos relacionados con el orgullo de la comunidad que relatan la experiencia de las poblaciones indígenas, otros como Cannupa Hanska Lugar, Marty Two Bulls, Jr y William Cordova vieron que este camino llevaba a la inmovilización. Ya sea desplazados por el colonialismo o la deportación o atrapados por el aumento del alcoholismo y la pobreza, esta experiencia queda ilustrada por una colección de restos del entorno consumista embellecidos con plumas y esmaltes cerámicos: los tenues rastros de una cultura enterrada bajo el peso del vicio y la explotación mientras aún se intenta mantener la distinción.

Installation view: (left) Natalie Ball, Battlefield Medicine Flags, 2015. Tanned deer hide, powwow competition number, US military jacket, wool, powwow shawl, willow branches, river rocks. Dimension variable; (right) Juan William Chavez, Potato Mound Sound, 2017. Mixed media. 120 x 108 x 48 inches. Courtesy the artists. Photo: Colin Conces

Además, esta idea de desplazamiento reitera la inspiración de la mariposa. El viaje que se ha realizado no tiene en cuenta los límites literales. Cuando la tierra te pertenece —como se refuerza en la filosofía cultural de estos artistas— tú eres monarca de esa tierra y tienes el derecho de reclamarla. Entonces, cuando estos artistas hablan de migración, a veces refleja una migración forzada por el neocolonialismo para imponer intereses capitalistas. Mientras observamos a personas que forman parte de nuestro país ser deportadas, en todo el sentido de la palabra, o que han tenido sus tierras confiscadas por oleoductos, nos damos cuenta de que los sistemas que decidieron que la existencia de personas de color y/o nativas fueran un inconveniente aún asignan valor en función de lo que el sistema tiene que ganar.

La mariposa monarca, de hecho, como especie intenta un viaje de 3,000 millas desde México a Canadá dos veces al año, pero siempre es una generación diferente de mariposas de aquellas que comenzaron este viaje que deben completarlo. De la misma manera, la experiencia de las poblaciones de personas que hacen estas travesías no termina donde se asientan. Los viajes de las comunidades nativas y las personas inmigrantes evolucionan con el tiempo a medida que sus historias personales, su historia común, sus identidades y su cultura se transmiten y enriquecen gracias a la experiencia de los que vienen después. Por ejemplo, no podemos simplemente describir a las personas de México a partir de un único conjunto de intereses o estéticas, ya que continuamente se representan y reinventan a sí mismos de maneras nuevas y profundas de acuerdo a sus circunstancias. Miramos el pasado, presente y futuro de México y su gente para entender quiénes son.

Siguiendo el enjambre de mariposas de cobre de Margarita Cabrera que literalmente vuelan de una habitación a otra, la segunda galería acoge a artistas que representan ideas de herencia mismas que amplifican la idea de construir sobre su pasado en el presente. Su trabajo utiliza el simbolismo, el estilo y el material que destaca una memoria cultural en lo que se refiere a la experiencia contemporánea. La artesanía y el comercio, un baluarte de la historia económica de estas poblaciones, refuerzan la conciencia de lo que se pierde con el tiempo. Artistas como Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez y Harold Méndez honran el trabajo y la técnica que construyeron su historia utilizando el ritual, la tecnología y la abstracción y presentan una nueva idea de lo que es y significa la historia nativa en el contexto sociopolítico actual de los EE.UU. Un claro ejemplo de esto son los sarapes de Iván Lozano compuestos de imágenes digitales y ensamblajes de suciedad geográficamente específica que nos muestran que la historia está en constante desarrollo.

Jeffrey Gibson, Like A Hammer, 2016. Mixed media installation: robe (canvas, wool, artificial sinew, glass beads, tin and metal jingles, nylon fringe) and drum (wood, rawhide, acrylic paint). 78 1⁄2 x 35 x 12 1⁄2 inches. Courtesy the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles. Photo: Colin Conces

Finalmente, los artistas que examinaron la transformación fueron inspirados por el ritual y la ceremonia como un impulso a la idea del viaje que hacemos como personas (como cultura) por la forma en que nuestro pasado y nuestro presente afectan nuestra capacidad de crecer y participar.

Muchos de estos artistas también utilizaron artesanía tradicional y textil en su trabajo ya que el rendimiento y la experiencia divergen de las ideas compartidas de miedo, dolor y control. La obra Soil de la artista de Omaha Sarah Rowe, muestra una serie de pañuelos manchados con un anillo de aceite de una manera tan uniforme que da la impresión de que el aceite estaba en el aro de bordado para comenzar. Esta pieza me ayudó a entender que una historia mezclada con la opresión o el desplazamiento siempre deja una marca indeleble que te impactará profundamente sin importar lo que trates de hacer. Esta impronta se hereda o incluso es instintiva.

Curiosamente, la idea del registro de archivos era prominente; no solo como documentos literales y como una manera de medir el tiempo y la experiencia —como en el caso del archivo arcoíris Map Pointz de Guadalupe Rosales sobre las cuadrillas de fiestas y la escena rave Latino en la década de 1990 en LA—, sino también como el recordatorio viviente de lo que esta historia significa para el futuro, como sucede en Is Our Future a Thing of the Past? de Josh Rios y Anthony Romero alrededor del futurismo Chicanx.

Installation view: Harold Mendez & Ronny Quevedo, Specter field (After Vicabamba), 2015. Linoleum tiles, gold and silver leaf, fiberglass mesh, spray enamel, graphite, charcoal, black silicone carbide, marking chalk, carnations, water, peanut oil, oxidized copper reproduction of a pre-Columbian death mask from the Museo del Oro (Bogota, Colombia). Dimension variable; Truman Lowe, Waterfall, 1993. Pine. 74 x 72 x 67 inches; Ivan Lozano, Un Sarape (A Palimpsest) 001, 002 & 003, 2017. Packing tape, photo transfers from color laser prints, acrylic rod, copper, rope. 67 3⁄4 x 46 x 1 3⁄4 inches. Courtesy the artists. Photo: Colin Conces

A medida que el legado de nuestra interacción con grupos de migrantes o indígenas acumula tratados, proclamas, leyes y prohibiciones, la historia de la división y la organización se convierte en un telón de fondo para la forma en que estas poblaciones han experimentado la historia en el país que compartimos. Las palabras de los diversos tratados expuestos en la instalación Broken Treaty Quilts de Gina Adams ilustran la marca indeleble de opresión y marginación que estas acciones dejan en el legado de estas comunidades y la forma en que sus vidas se ven afectadas a partir de ese momento. Si una colcha es, literalmente, el conjunto de múltiples piezas y puntadas, las colchas históricas de las experiencias de las comunidades de color se construyen por la multitud de sus componentes, una gran parte de los cuales no son su decisión.

En contraste con este medio tradicional, el video desempeñó un papel destacado en el trabajo de muchos artistas. Los videos colocan al artista o su tema en el centro de la obra y te obligan a verlxs a ellxs y a su humanidad como lo que es, y no como una representación empaquetada de una vasta cultura construida para los medios hegemónicos. La pieza de Donna Huanca, Dressing the Queen sigue el revestimiento en capas con muchas piezas de ropa y telas sobre una mujer hasta el punto en que apenas se ve su cara para después, subsecuentemente, ser “desvestida”. Imagino que la responsabilidad de tener que representar una cultura, una raza, una religión, un género o una filosofía es tan pesada que se siente que no importas como persona; solo importa cómo otros pueden recopilar una narración a partir de ti. Poco después, la audiencia que quedó cautivada por tu exotismo y lucha ha avanzado y tú quedas, una vez más, contigo mismx.

Monarcas: Brown y Native Contemporary Artists en el Path of the Butterfly ofrece algo que la gente en Nebraska puede ser que no reconozca enteramente: la idea de que las personas de las Primeras Naciones y los ciudadanos e inmigrantes latinos existen más allá de un libro de texto de historia, un punto de discusión o un objetivo político. Al mismo tiempo, evidencía como nobilizamos una cultura rica y su contribución histórica, como la de los nativos americanos, para condensarla en una identidad empaquetada que homogenice y devalúe la pluralidad y diversidad que caracteriza a estas culturas.

Donna Huanca, Dressing the Queen (Pachamama), 2009–2010. Video, silent. 11:33 mins looped. Courtesy Peres Projects, Berlin

Al igual que la mariposa monarca, el viaje que define la existencia de las comunidades que esta exposición acoge es complicado, persistente, transformador, fragmentado y un poco de un milagro. No pueden hacerlo solo, no se detiene en ellxs y siempre llegaran del otro lado cambiadxs, una transformación que nunca se detiene. Lo que obtengo de este viaje representado, como alguien que nunca ha experimentado esta realidad, es la capacidad de comprender la dicotomía del valor y la lucha que este complicado legado representa para los inmigrantes y las comunidades de las Primeras Naciones.

La mariposa monarca sirve como una encarnación viva de la conectividad que tenemos como personas. Las culturas indígenas en nuestro país cruzaron fronteras para cumplir un propósito intrínseco y han dependido unas de otras para realizar plenamente ese propósito. La interrupción de su entorno natural y la amenaza a su identidad cultural aún persisten ya que los derechos ambientales, civiles y humanos siguen siendo un blanco vívido. Cómo honramos sus caminos se conecta en gran medida con la forma en que entendemos nuestra responsabilidad de preservar su tradición, levantar sus voces y ser administradores de la tierra.

 

Melinda Kozel es historiadora de arte y educadora de arte con sede en Omaha. Nebraska. Es candidata para el Learning Community Council ode Omaha para el Subcouncil District 3.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Atlas sobre papel

Sabotaje

Voy i vuelvo

Antibody