19.03.2021

Feminist Art: The personal, every day more political  a show by Artfocus Latinoamérica

March 6 – June 12, 2021

Artists: Nereida Apaza Mamani, Claudia Casarino, Ana De Orbegoso, Colectiva Hilos, Isabel Guerrero Encinas, Catalina Jaramillo Quijano, Silvia Levenson, Nicole Mazza, Celina Portella, Ángela Restrepo, Natalia Revilla, Judith Romero & Annette Turrillo

More information:
Artfocus Latinoamérica
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Feminist Art: The personal, every day more political is an exhibition held by Art Focus Latin America, the first association of art galleries in the Americas, made up of galleries from Argentina (Pabellón 4 Arte Contemporáneo), Brazil (Zipper Gallery), Colombia (Policroma), Estados Unidos (RoFa Projects), Mexico (Quetzalli), Peru and Uruguay (Del Paseo).

Art Focus Latinoamérica is a gallery collective with the main objective to promote the development of the art of the Americas in a joint, fully collaborative and global way. As well as favoring the dissemination, promotion and commercialization of the works of the artists they represent through curatorial practices and exhibitions carried out with recognized curators and references from America, in collaboration with art collectors.

On this occasion, Cerrucha writes the curatorial text of the exhibition. Cerrucha (Mexico, 1981) is a feminist artivist working with photography, performance, and intervention of public space. Relational aesthetics are the core of her participatory projects, where she explores the social construct of Otherness. Her series “Mapping Skin Deep” was nominated for the Award for Public Art 2017 (USA/China). She holds a BFA in Photography by Concordia University (CA) and works as an anti-oppression facilitator and consultant for various organizations and has received commissions from UN Women France, the Exterior Relations Secretariat, and the Mexican Congress amongst others. Her latest project, “Trench,” is a permanent photographic installation portraying more than 100 women united covering an entire train of Mexico City’s subway system.

This group of galleries choose as thematic axis the art made by women on the Women’s History Month to honor, support, denounce, value and educate through art.

As Cerrucha mentions in her text, “this exhibition portrays five recurring themes in which the artworks are inscribed: the home, the body, language, the visibility of women and the use of textiles as a support. By representing bodies, subjectivities and relationships in non-hegemonic ways, the artists vindicate the political dimension of private life.”

With this show, six galleries and thirteen artists demonstrate that “art and the feminist movement have gone hand in hand since the beginning. The power that artworks have to challenge the public has a greater and collective objective: to question and thereby help in the transformation of our context so that women and girls can enjoy a life without violence. Feminist art is a political act.”

We also have the collaboration of the renowned collector Eduardo Salazar Yusti, consultant on business strategy, co-founder and investor in education and technology. Convinced of the social power of art, he is part of several cultural projects and is an active member of the board of directors of the Modern Art Museum of Bogotá (MAMBO). With Juliana Hernández, his partner, they collect contemporary art with an emphasis on the artistic production of Latin American women.

Salazar makes an invitation and recommendation with his participation in this exhibition: “There is always room for a committed piece of art. The invitation is to give it the equity and the place it deserves. This empowered art, made by women, is sure to enrich any collection.”

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