Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Forging Territories: Queer Afro and Latinx Contemporary Art

Curated by Rubén Esparza

San Diego Art Institute San Diego, California, USA 06/29/2019 – 11/03/2019

Patrisse Cullors, Untitled (2019). Performance for opening night. ©Patrisse Cullors. Photo by ©Philipp Scholz Ritterman and ©Tim Hardy

Alma Lopez, Santa, Lucia, Santa Wilgerfortis, Julia Pastrana (2014). ©Alma Lopez. Photo by ©Philipp Scholz Ritterman and ©Tim Hardy

Vinnie Garcia, 2nd Puberty (2019). Immersive installation. ©Vinnie Garcia. Photo by ©Philipp Scholz Ritterman and ©Tim Hardy

Musings on a Blacktino Critical Optic

The year 2019 marks a watershed moment in LGBTQ history as museums and cultural institutions across the country commemorate the fifty-year anniversary of Stonewall, that raucous riot where queers fought back at intrepid police raids at Stonewall Inn in New York’s Greenwich Village in 1969. As with all cultural mythologies, other intermittent moments remain muddled in this historical retelling. Little regarded are the uprisings and demonstrations in California like Cooper’s Do-Nut in 1959, Compton’s Cafeteria in 1966, and Black Cat Tavern in 1967 where gender non-conformists and other queers of color rose up against police harassment.

Today as museums attend to LGBTQ visuality in numerous shows, the uproarious power of cross-ethnic solidarities and interracial affinities mustn’t be overlooked. Queers of color have served a critical purpose in art and social activism. Their creative practices—together and apart—activate San Diego Art Institute’s Forging Territories: Queer Afro and Latinx Contemporary Art, a show confronting these cultural convergences anew.

Curated by Rubén Esparza, Forging Territories stages a conversation in the historic and contemporary overlaps of queer blackness and brownness. Perhaps building on what E. Patrick Johnson and Ramon Rivera-Servera have called “blacktino,” an “optic for understanding engagements with black and Latina/o experience, aesthetics, and erotics in performance,” the SDAI show surveys twenty artists linked in a vocabulary of survival, a means of forging ahead through common matrices of ethnic objectification, police harassment, immigrant detention, and the interplay of sexual attraction, desire, and friendship [1]. It is within these intimate and sometimes fraught crossroads that the artists composing this show “converge at the margins of homonormative white culture” and thus, elucidate another territory [2]. It is a territory of self-revelatory and relational imagery, searching for definition through honest portraits and raw convictions.

Portraiture focuses a central area of concern for queer black and brown artists in the show including the saintly imagery of Alma Lopez’s sacred Chicana lesbian icons and Amina Cruz’s candid snapshots of queer of color life. None are more exemplary than Laura Aguilar. Her photography blurs the boundaries of earthwork, feminist, and landscape imagery. With her self-nudity, she realigns natural architectural surrounds making line, form, and curve seamless. Her depiction of Latina lesbian desire broadens the terms of what is natural and what belongs. The result is a queer of color ecology, a way of negotiating sexuality, gender, and self-definition through plant matters.

Aguilar’s work complements other environmental imagery by Texas Isaiah, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, dana washington, and Maurice Harris who similarly riff on the dichotomous coordinates of masculinity/femininity, natural/unnatural, organic/inorganic in pictures undoing and remaking black queer forms. Uprooting the black nude from the fraught visual archive of Robert Mapplethorpe where floral specimens exaggerate phallic imagery of his African American sitters, these artists confront the camera and its racialized gaze. Harris’ positioning of body and bouquet, washington’s reimagining of the Garden of Eden, and Isaiah’s deeply introspective portraits of black and brown queer subjects search for another definition in the flora and fauna of self-disclosure. These are no ordinary black bodies and as Sepuya’s work further notes, they breakdown distances as interracial relations entangle in the picture frame and with the camera technology itself. He challenges the way viewers relate to queer black male bodies and thus, unsettles the eroticized contact zones rife with racialized anxiety long traced in American art history and visual culture.

Contemplating the delicacies of queer of color appearances, other works principally juxtapose hard and soft, exterior and interior, penetrability and impenetrability. Hector Silva’s graphite drawings reconstitute the solid facades of urban homeboys and barrio street thugs with sartorial codes of self-solicitation. Like Carlos Almaraz before him, Silva questions machista muscularity testing the divisions of compulsory heterosexuality and sexual ambiguity; emboldening another look at LA’s homeboys in their sexual tensions and suggestive self-fashioning. Other artists like Vinnie Garcia, Roy Martinez (aka Lambe Culo), and Nao Bustamante fancy fabrics to adorn gender variant and queer of color worlds. Like José Muñoz’s worldmaking proposal for “the ways in which performances—both theatrical and everyday rituals—have the ability to establish alternative views of the world,” these artists fabricate site-specific installations, adornments, and para-military garments and in the case of Bustamante’s soldadera Kevlar gowns, fashioning the queer ethnoracial body with bulletproof fibers for a better tomorrow [3].

The future promise of some artworks whether in the romantic parable of Denae Howard’s Black Love Story (2015) or Joey Terrill’s mid-coital Just What Is It, About Today’s Homos, That Makes Them So Appealing (2011) also necessitates reflection on our present circumstances and vulnerabilities. Currently, trans women of color shoulder the highest propensity for anti-transgender victimization and death. The fragility of life is something queers of color know all too well. As Rubén Esparza’s Pulse 49 (2017) reflects, blackness and brownness intermingle in the aftermath of twinned travesties: AIDS and Pulse nightclub. Penned in the artist’s own blood, Esparza inscribes the names of the forty-nine killed on June 12, 2016 when a shooter opened fire on Latino night at Pulse, the Orlando nightclub. With twenty-three slain of Puerto Rican descent, the horror of that moment echoed the increased exposures of violence and brutality that black, brown, and Afro-Latinx queers have confronted transnationally stretching from island to mainland. Listed in a format rising from the bottom region of the page, Pulse 49 eerily reflects the enlisting of names in a manner reminiscent of the AIDS crisis. Although there is no end to the dying with people of color representing the highest rate of new HIV infections presently, Esparza returns to a familiar AIDS memorial vocabulary and births these names in the plasmic fluid made lethal in AIDS phobic discourses. Esparza bears on this moment of AIDS history and cross-ethnic queer performance art to forge new territory. Thus, he commences a language of loss that a blacktino queer optic makes possible.

—Text by Robb Hernández, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of California, Riverside

Artists

Laura Aguilar, Carlos Almaraz, Patrisse Cullors, Texas Isaiah, Devin Morris, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, dana washington, Nao Bustamante, Amina Cruz, Angel Divina, Rafa Esparza, Vinnie Garcia, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Maurice Harris, Danae Howard, Alma Lopez, Roy Martinez, Devin N. Morris, Joey Terrill.

www.sandiego-art.org

[1] Johnson, E. Patrick and Ramón H. Rivera-Servera. “Introduction: Ethnoracial Intimacies in Blacktino Queer Performance.” In Blacktino Queer Performance, edited by E. Patrick Johnson and Ramón Rivera-Servera, 1-18. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016.

[2] Ibid., 6.

[3] Muñoz, José Esteban. Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999.

Patrisse Cullors, Untitled (2019). Performance for opening night. ©Patrisse Cullors. Photo by ©Philipp Scholz Ritterman and ©Tim Hardy

Alma Lopez, Santa, Lucia, Santa Wilgerfortis, Julia Pastrana (2014). ©Alma Lopez. Photo by ©Philipp Scholz Ritterman and ©Tim Hardy

Vinnie Garcia, 2nd Puberty (2019). Immersive installation. ©Vinnie Garcia. Photo by ©Philipp Scholz Ritterman and ©Tim Hardy

Reflexiones Sobre la Óptica Crítica Blacktino

El año 2019 marca un hito en la historia LGBTQ. Los museos e instituciones culturales de todo el país conmemoran el quincuagésimo aniversario de Stonewall, ese tumultuoso disturbio en el que la población queer se defendió de las intrépidas redadas policiales en el Stonewall Inn de Greenwich Village, Nueva York en 1969. Como en todas las mitologías culturales, otros momentos intermitentes se mantienen ensombrecidos en los recuentos históricos. Son poco reconocidos los levantamientos y las manifestaciones en California como Cooper’s Do-Nut en 1959, Compton’s Cafeteria en 1966 y Black Cat Tavern en 1967, donde personas queer de color y de género no-conforme se alzaron contra el acoso policial.

Hoy en día, a medida que los museos se ocupan de la visibilidad LGBTQ en numerosas exhibiciones, no se debe pasar por alto el poder tempestuoso de las solidaridades interétnicas y las afinidades interraciales. La población queer de color ha tenido una función crítica en el arte y el activismo social. Sus prácticas creativas juntas y separadas activan Forging Territories: Queer Afro and Latinx Contemporary Art (Forjando territorios: Arte Contemporáneo Queer Afro y Latinx) del Instituto de Arte de San Diego (SDAI), exhibición que confronta desde una nueva perspectiva estas convergencias culturales.

Forging Territories, con curaduría de Rubén Esparza, organiza una conversación sobre las intersecciones históricas y contemporáneas de las experiencias queer latina y negra. Con base en lo que E. Patrick Johnson y Ramón Rivera-Servera han llamado “blacktino”, una “óptica para entender las interacciones con la experiencia negra y latina, sus estéticas y el erotismo en el performance,” esta exhibición de SDAI muestra a diecinueve artistas vinculados en un vocabulario de la supervivencia, una capacidad de avanzar a través de matrices comunes de objetivación étnica, acoso policial, detención por estatus migratorio y la interacción de atracción sexual, deseo y amistad [1]. Es dentro de estas íntimas y, en ocasiones, problemáticas encrucijadas que los artistas que componen esta exhibición “convergen en los márgenes de la cultura blanca homonormativa” y, por lo tanto, dilucidan otro territorio [2]. Es un territorio de autorrevelación e imaginería relacional en busca de definición a través de retratos honestos y convicciones firmes.

El retrato se enfoca en un área de interés central para los artistas queer de color de esta exhibición, incluidas la imaginería sagrada de los iconos lésbicos chicanos de Alma López y las fotos instantáneas de Amina Cruz sobre la vida de gente queer de color. Ninguna de las muestras lo ejemplifica mejor que la de Laura Aguilar. Su fotografía difumina los límites del earthwork, el feminismo y la imaginería del paisaje. Con su desnudez, realinea entornos arquitectónicos naturales logrando una continuidad entre la línea, la forma y la curva. Su representación del deseo lésbico de las latinas amplía los términos de lo que es natural y lo que pertenece. El resultado es una ecología queer de color, una manera de negociar la sexualidad, el género y la autodefinición a través de cuestiones relacionadas con la materia vegetal.

El trabajo de Aguilar complementa las imágenes ambientales de Texas Isaiah, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, dana washington y Maurice Harris, quienes de manera similar improvisan las coordenadas dicotómicas de la masculinidad/feminidad, lo natural/antinatural, lo orgánico/inorgánico, deshaciendo y rehaciendo formas de lo queer negro. Estos artistas confrontan la cámara y su mirada racializada al desarraigar el desnudo negro del extenso archivo visual de Robert Mapplethorpe, donde los especímenes florales exageran las imágenes fálicas de sus modelos. La forma en que Harris coloca el ramo y el cuerpo, la reinvención del Jardín del Edén de washington y los retratos profundamente introspectivos de sujetos queer de color de Isaiah buscan otra definición de auto-revelación en la flora y la fauna. No se trata de cuerpos negros ordinarios y, como puede verse en el trabajo de Sepuya, estos rompen distancias a medida que las relaciones interraciales se mezclan con el marco de la imagen y la tecnología misma de la cámara. Sepuya desafía la manera en que los espectadores se relacionan con los cuerpos queer masculinos negros, desestabilizando, así, las zonas de contacto erotizadas cargadas de una ansiedad racializada que se encuentra de forma latente en la historia del arte y la cultura visual de los Estados Unidos.

Al contemplar la exquisitez de la apariencia de la gente queer de color, otros trabajos yuxtaponen principalmente lo duro y lo suave, el exterior y el interior, la penetrabilidad y la impenetrabilidad. Los dibujos de grafito de Héctor Silva reconstituyen la apariencia dura de los jóvenes (homeboys) y los mafiosos (thugs) del barrio con los códigos de la vestimenta de la prostitución. Silva, al igual que Carlos Almaraz antes que él, cuestiona la musculatura machista, poniendo a prueba las divisiones de la heterosexualidad obligada y la ambigüedad sexual, alentando así otro tipo de mirada a las tensiones sexuales y la autodeterminación de los jóvenes de barrio de Los Ángeles. Otros artistas como Vinnie García, Roy Martínez (alias Lambe Culo) y Nao Bustamante utilizan telas para adornar la variante de género y los mundos de la gente queer de color. Al igual que la propuesta de creación de mundos de José Muñoz en “la manera en que el performance —tanto teatrales como rituales cotidianos— tienen la capacidad de establecer puntos de vista alternativos hacia el mundo”, estos artistas fabrican instalaciones de sitio específico, adornos y prendas para-militares. En el caso de Bustamante, sus trajes de soldadera hechos de kevlar estilizan el cuerpo queer etnorracial con fibras a prueba de balas para un mejor mañana [3].

La futura promesa de algunas obras de arte, ya sea en la parábola romántica de Denae Howard Historia de amor negro (2015) o en la obra inter-coital de Joey Terrill, ¿Qué es Eso, que Hace a los “Homos” de Hoy, Tan Diferentes, Tan Atractivos? (2011) requiere una reflexión sobre nuestras circunstancias y vulnerabilidades actuales. Hoy en día, la mayor propensión a la victimización y muerte anti-transgénero recae sobre las mujeres de color trans. La fragilidad de la vida es algo que los queers de color conocen demasiado bien. Como lo refleja Pulso 49 (2017) de Rubén Esparza, el ser negro y el ser latino se entremezclan en las secuelas de la hermandad travesti: SIDA y el club nocturno Pulse. Escrito con la propia sangre del artista, Esparza inscribe los nombres de los cuarenta y nueve muertos el 12 de junio de 2016, cuando un asesino abrió fuego en la noche latina de Pulse, el club nocturno de Orlando. Con los veintitrés muertos de ascendencia puertorriqueña, el horror de ese momento hizo eco de la creciente exposición a la violencia y brutalidad que los queers negrxs, latinxs y afro-latinx han enfrentado transnacionalmente desde las islas hasta tierra firme. El listado de Pulse 49, en un formato que se eleva desde la región inferior de la página, refleja de manera escalofriante la lista de nombres reminiscente a la crisis del SIDA. Aunque no se percibe un fin a las muertes (actualmente las personas de color representan la tasa más alta de nuevas infecciones de VIH), Esparza regresa al vocabulario familiar del SIDA y da vida a estos nombres con el fluido plasmático que los discursos fóbicos del SIDA han convertido en letal. Esparza se apoya en este momento de la historia del SIDA y del arte performance queer interétnico para forjar un nuevo territorio. Así, comienza un lenguaje de pérdida que hace posible una óptica queer blacktino.

—Texto por Robb Hernández, Ph.D., Profesor Asociado, Universidad de California, Riverside

Artistas

Laura Aguilar, Carlos Almaraz, Patrisse Cullors, Texas Isaiah, Devin Morris, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, dana washington, Nao Bustamante, Amina Cruz, Angel Divina, Rafa Esparza, Vinnie Garcia, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Maurice Harris, Danae Howard, Alma Lopez, Roy Martinez, Devin N. Morris, Joey Terrill.

www.sandiego-art.org

[1] Johnson, E. Patrick and Ramón H. Rivera-Servera. “Introduction: Ethnoracial Intimacies in Blacktino Queer Performance.” In Blacktino Queer Performance, edited by E. Patrick Johnson and Ramón Rivera-Servera, 1-18. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016.

[2] Ibid., 6.

[3] Muñoz, José Esteban. Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Baroque and Chasm

A Gentil Carioca Jaqueline Martins

Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960-1985, at Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, USA

90 gramos de vida útil