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Issue 21

A Burning Song

25.10.2021 - 24.01.2022

Co-edited with Maya Juracán

This issue of the magazine has been a challenge. The exhaustion of two years of the pandemic was evident throughout the writing and editing processes about a land that is crumbling as a result of the capitalist monoculture that produces and normalizes violence, toxicity, deterioration, fear, and selfishness. Given this, we want to thank the writers for joining this issue that we imagine as a song of many voices that insists on the possibility of the future. Because we have all internalized the idea that new futures are not possible, we know that it is not an easy task to dare to be visionaries. However, it is vitally important that we continue to collectively weave together new dreams of autonomy out of stories that recognize the ability to (re)invent life. What does it mean to twist the sign of abuse of power to imagine life and justice in the present-future? What images accompany us—or do we need to create—to trust it?

When the Euro-white anthropologist Kirchhoff decisively named a certain geographic area of the continent “Mesoamerica,” he imposed a specific universal order, a cartographic logic of the world that has systematically allowed genocides, dispossession, and socio-environmental racism for the benefit of the West. The memory of the bodies-territories-land— those that the structure of the nation-state, with the support of imperialism, continually tries to erase—is then a seed that (re)invents from its germination: it scratches away at the imposed mediocrity as it traces writings of disobedience that demand other languages of recognition and justice. The bodies-territories- land resist in movement. They shift, they migrate, they change, they go into exile, they organize and resist. In the future, the fire has not ceased; the mountain that rises up in the throats of those who do not allow themselves to be dominated by power still burns. What helps these writings on disobedience to be preserved in the future? How does memory persevere? What forms does the sovereignty of the imagination take?

In this issue of Terremoto, we want to combine reflections on memory and imagination, questioning how the symbolic and political order of contemporary art instrumentalizes both for the convenience of socio-political elites. We want to share our thoughts about the possibility of misconfiguring being in the world by summoning those in resistance, who through collective aesthetic practices imagine the futures yet to germinate.

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