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Issue 2

Things

13.04.2015 - 29.06.2015

As we pace around them in exhibitions, shape them in studios and evoke them in conversations, art objects also look back at us, and we probably pervade their minds as much as they do ours. How can we access their impressions of us? Are they collecting us in their museums?

The changing nature of the art object fluctuates along with our expectations. We hope for it to be a vehicle for transcendence as well as a tool for historical analysis. Bewildering yet familiar, sometimes rational and always clairvoyant, this object has crossed the 20th century as a polymorphic entity: from flat monochrome to monumental sculpture, handcrafted or industrial, sanctified artifact or prop, symbol of social status, as well as a sign of protest. Worth nothing or millions, existing only when it is named, or perhaps resisting language through material dexterity. Every art object is a clock, ticking in and out of synch with history, waiting to be recognized from within the cracks of official discourses, always one step ahead of us in the negotiation with the unknown.

In the second issue of Terremoto, authors will discuss the politics, narratives, and properties impregnating the art object through a series of stories, essays, and conversations, thus building a panorama on these issues while coping with the wide range of sensibilities considered in its line of inquiry.

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