Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas
Pop América, 1965-1975 Pop América, 1965-1975

Pop América, 1965-1975

Curatorship by Esther Gabara

Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University Durham, North Carolina, USA 02/21/2019 – 07/21/2019

Despite the wide appeal of Pop art’s engaging imagery, the broader public remains unaware of the participation and significant contribution of Latin American and Latino/a artists working at the same time and alongside their U.S. and European counterparts. The Nasher Museum presents Pop América, 1965-1975, the first exhibition with a hemispheric vision of Pop. The exhibition

Antonio Caro, Colombia Coca-Cola (1976). Enamel on sheet metal. Collection of the MIT List Visual Arts Center. Image courtesy of the artist and Casas Riegner, Bogota, Colombia. © Antonio Caro Antonio Dias, The Illustration of Art/Uncovering the Cover-Up (1973). Screenprint and acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and Galeria Nara Roesler, New York, New

Regeneración: Three Generations of Revolutionary Ideology at the Vincent Price Art Museum, Los Angeles, USA Regeneración: Three Generations of Revolutionary Ideology at the Vincent Price Art Museum, Los Angeles, USA

Regeneración: Three Generations of Revolutionary Ideology at the Vincent Price Art Museum, Los Angeles, USA

By Matthew Stromberg Los Angeles, California, USA 09/29/2018 – 02/16/2019

As right-wing movements take hold across the globe—from the US to Brazil to Europe—liberal progressives are confronted with an existential crisis. Feeling betrayed and disillusioned with the promises of the institutional Left, they must search for new forms of resistance to cultural conservatism, xenophobia, and destructive capitalist ideologies that are enacting real violence upon already

Harry Gamboa Jr., “He Threw a Rock at Me” presentada en Regeneración (Los Ángeles), vol. 1, no. 9, 1971. Cortesía de Harry Gamboa Jr. (Editor, Regeneración, Volumen 2, 1971–75) A medida que los movimientos de derecha se afianzan en todo el mundo —desde Estados Unidos hasta Brasil y Europa— los progresistas liberales se enfrentan a

Construyendo puentes. Arte chicano/mexicano de LA a CDMX Construyendo puentes. Arte chicano/mexicano de LA a CDMX

Construyendo puentes. Arte chicano/mexicano de LA a CDMX

Curada por Julián Bermúdez

Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil Ciudad de México 09/21/2018 – 11/25/2018

Nacida a mediados de la década de 1960, junto con los protestantes de la Guerra de Vietnam y el movimiento Black Power a favor de los derechos civiles, la lucha chicana desafió la categorización y los estereotipos burlones ampliamente divulgados entre la población anglosajona, así como a los centros educativos públicos, plagados de deserción, que

Patrick Martínez, América es para los dreamers (detalle), 2016-2017. Cortesía AltaMed Health Services Construyendo puentes. Arte chicano/mexicano de Los Ángeles a Ciudad de México. Vista de sala. Cortesía MACG Construyendo puentes. Arte chicano/mexicano de Los Ángeles a Ciudad de México. Vista de sala. Cortesía MACG. Nacida a mediados de la década de 1960, junto con

Counterspectacles Counterspectacles

Counterspectacles

by Suzy Halajian

Counterspectacles Asco’s ephemeral actions reconfigured the patterns of public space. Stations of the Cross (1971) was the East Los Angeles collective’s first public spectacle: a walking mural along a one-mile stretch of Whittier Boulevard in East Los Angeles, performed on Christmas Eve. It was also Asco’s earliest attempt at reclaiming the streets. The act served as a theatrical, public protest against the

First Supper (After A Major Riot), ©1974, Harry Gamboa Jr. Counterspectacles Asco’s ephemeral actions reconfigured the patterns of public space. Stations of the Cross (1971) was the East Los Angeles collective’s first public spectacle: a walking mural along a one-mile stretch of Whittier Boulevard in East Los Angeles, performed on Christmas Eve. It was also Asco’s earliest attempt at reclaiming the