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Issue 4

Wild Researchers

12.10.2015 - 14.12.2015

Growing societal regimentation on the global level has normalized cultural practices that were once informal and vernacular, yet paradoxically, this goes hand-in-hand with increasingly acute economic de-regularization.

That said, recent technological evolution has lent unprecedented visibility to alternative methodologies and ways of thinking, opening up new spaces for knowledge exchange. Today’s art world is situated at a crossroads where the radical professionalization of the artistic vocation and its educational industry converges with the power of the market, as well as with alternative initiatives whose roles grow ambiguous, split between a search for integration and the will to respond.

Artists have come out of the studio, but only to confront other fields of specialization with which they must negotiate their own specificity and “authority,” thus becoming more or less empirical researchers who act from within the fault-lines and fissures of the interdisciplinary.

How then can we take advantage of these methodological movements, specifically in terms of how art is taught and spoken of? What new tools and what past legacies can we use to consolidate that flexibility and freedom, as a means of reinventing the artist’s vocation? Through reflection on periods and key historical figures, interviews and fiction, Terremoto’s fourth issue seeks to look into the figure of the “wild researcher” that the artist of our times could be.

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Juan Antonio Roda playing cards with a University model, 1963. Archive of the exhibition Roda: dibujo de un maestro, curated by Lucas Ospina. Department of the Arts in the Universidad de los Andes

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