Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas
Talking Back to Power: Tania Bruguera at YBCA, San Francisco Talking Back to Power: Tania Bruguera at YBCA, San Francisco

Talking Back to Power: Tania Bruguera at YBCA, San Francisco

By Emily K. Holmes San Francisco, California, USA 06/16/2017 – 10/29/2017

Before I even entered the building of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA), Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder presented itself to me in the form of a bold orange billboard. Placed in an exterior courtyard facing a busy downtown San Francisco intersection, the billboard at the time stated quite plainly:

Tania Bruguera, Escuela de Arte Útil, 2017–ongoing. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard. Antes de entrar en el edificio del Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA), Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power

Queerly Tèhuäntin | Cuir Us

Queerly Tèhuäntin | Cuir Us

Yolanda Andrade, Naomi Rincón Gallardo, Ester Hernández, and more...

Galería de la Raza San Francisco, California, USA 08/11/2017 – 10/07/2017

Galería de la Raza presents Queerly Tèhuäntin | Cuir Us, a visual dialogue across borders and generations about the ongoing struggle to be simultaneously Mexican or Chicanx and queer, that is, to be who we are. To be queerly tèhuäntin, Nahuatl for “us”. To be queerly us, queer or cuir -as the term is increasingly used in Spanish- in the sense of nonconventional sexualities and

Yolanda Andrade, Las Alas Del Deseo, 1993. Archival Pigment Print. 18 ½” x 12 ½”. Courtesy of Galería de la Raza. Installation view: Ester Hernández, La Ofrenda, 1990. Screenprint. 29 ½” x 21”. Courtesy of Galería de la Raza. Rurru Mipanochia, Tlaltecuhtli 1, 2017. Acrylic, stylograph, and markers on amate paper. 28” x 23”. Courtesy of Galería de

Silhouette Silhouette

Silhouette

Curated by Kevin Krueger and Aaron Harbour

Et al. etc. San Francisco, California, USA 06/17/2017 – 07/15/2017

Artists: Loney Abrams & Johnny Stanish, Nico Colón & Grant Gutierrez, Gracie DeVito, Fox Hysen, Brian Longe, Ruby Sky Stiler, Christine Wang I go out to find The one with whom I’ve seen all hours’ moons Once the curtains lifted And he said, “I only swim to you” Language is such a play – He called his exit but his eyes

Brian Longe, The East is Red Number One, 2014. Graphite & acrylic on raw canvas. 113 x 86 inches. Courtesy of Et al. etc. Nico Colón & Grant Gutierrez, Spencer Avenue, 2017. Installation throughout space. Courtesy of Et al. etc. Installation view: Silhouette, 2017. Courtesy of Et al. etc. Artists: Loney Abrams & Johnny Stanish, Nico Colón & Grant Gutierrez, Gracie

Nutshell Nutshell

Nutshell

Laurie Reid

Et al. etc. San Francisco, California, USA 03/11/2017 – 04/15/2017

“Oh, God, I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.” – Shakespeare, Hamlet Et al. etc. presents Nutshell, a solo exhibition by Laurie Reid, curated by Juana Berrío. Laurie and Juana have been in conversation for the past few weeks.

Superheaviest, 2014. Watercolor on paper. 10.25×7”. Courtesy of Et al. etc., San Francisco. Installation view (from left to right): Fertility, 2015. Oil on linen. 24×18”; Up the stairs into the warm night, 2016. Oil on canvas. 40×50″; Nutshell, 2016. Oil on canvas. 36×48″. Courtesy of Et al etc., San Francisco. Installation view, 2017. Courtesy of

Still Life

Still Life

Rhonda Holberton

CULT San Francisco, California, USA 01/11/2017 – 03/12/2017

Holberton’s work explores the way technology reshapes the relationship between humans and our physical world. As the title Still Life suggests, this exhibition utilizes material and process to transgress the boundary between stillness and life. Unexpected parallels emerge between the organic and constructed such as value and waste, self and other, cognition and physiology, and

Rhonda Holberton, Still Life (vanitas), 2017. Archival Pigment Print. 19 x 23 inches. Courtesy: CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions. Photo credit: John Wilson White. Rhonda Holberton, Dust to Dust, 2017. Gold dust, mosquitoes, sugar water, acrylic, nylon. Dimensions variable. Courtesy: CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions. Photo credit: John Wilson White. Rhonda Holberton, Front gallery installation view (from

Stillness in Motion — Cloud Cities Stillness in Motion — Cloud Cities

Stillness in Motion — Cloud Cities

Tomás Saraceno

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art San Francisco, California, USA 12/17/2016 – 05/21/2017

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) presents the exhibition Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion—Cloud Cities, by artist Tomás Saraceno, on view at the museum December 17, 2016 through May 21, 2017. Organized by the SFMOMA Architecture and Design department, the exhibition includes an immersive site-specific cloudscape installation of suspended tension structures and floating

Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion—Cloud Cities; installation view at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, December 17, 2016–May 21, 2017; photo: Katherine Du Tiel Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion—Cloud Cities; installation view at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, December 17, 2016–May 21, 2017; photo: Katherine Du Tiel Tomás Saraceno, Cloud Cities Thermodynamics

Inhuman Transformation of New Year’s Decoration, Obsolete Conception or 2

Inhuman Transformation of New Year’s Decoration, Obsolete Conception or 2

Yuki Kimura

CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts San Francisco, California, USA 12/13/2016 – 02/25/2017

The installation practice of Yuki Kimura (b. 1971 in Kyoto; based in Berlin) borrows from architecture, design, photography, and sculpture to make the immaterial material. She often incorporates found photographs in her work as sculptural objects, combining appropriated imagery with other found and constructed objects or furniture to create mixed-media sculptures. For Kimura’s Wattis Institute

Installation view (detail) of Yuki Kimura’s mixed-media installation titled Inhuman Transformation of New Year’s Decoration, Obsolete Conception or 2 at CCA Wattis Institute of Contemporary Arts; courtesy the artist and Taka Ishii Gallery; photo: Johnna Arnold. Installation view (detail) of Yuki Kimura’s mixed-media installation titled Inhuman Transformation of New Year’s Decoration, Obsolete Conception or 2

The Greatest Arrogance

The Greatest Arrogance

Gregory Kalliche

ASHES / ASHES San Francisco, California, USA 01/10/2017 – 02/25/2017

They thought: I wonder if I could grow a chair? Then grow a person to sit in it, and another to join them once the first fully integrates. Or even start from the next step back and grow the lights from scratch too. Start the knot tying, sapling bending —putty sculpt that wing into a

Gregory Kalliche, The Greatest Arrogance, 2016. Single-channel video, color and sound. 3:23 min. Courtesy of ASHES / ASHES, San Francisco. Gregory Kalliche, The Greatest Arrogance, 2016. Single-channel video, color and sound. 3:23 min. Courtesy of ASHES / ASHES, San Francisco. Gregory Kalliche, Understudies, 2016. Ultraviolet LEDs with aluminum channel and power supply, UV sensitive PVC

Fingerprints of the Gods

Fingerprints of the Gods

SANGREE

Et al. etc. San Francisco, California, USA 07/23/2016 – 08/20/2016

Presented by Yautepec After the stars were formed in massive dense clouds of molecular hydrogen and the Earth’s crust had cooled, the unknown came rolling into our end of the milky way and our consciousness became aware. They came from the upper atmosphere, flesh and blood beings who were looked upon to have created plant

Presented by Yautepec After the stars were formed in massive dense clouds of molecular hydrogen and the Earth’s crust had cooled, the unknown came rolling into our end of the milky way and our consciousness became aware. They came from the upper atmosphere, flesh and blood beings who were looked upon to have created plant

Feathered Changes, Serpent Disappearances Feathered Changes, Serpent Disappearances

Feathered Changes, Serpent Disappearances

Mariana Castillo Deball

San Francisco Art Institute San Francisco, California, USA 04/14/2016 – 07/30/2016

​Berlin-based artist Mariana Castillo Deball (b. Mexico City, 1975) reveals gaps in the often unquestioned narratives of museology and archaeology in a new exhibition at San Francisco Art Institute’s (SFAI) Walter and McBean Galleries this spring. The installation brings together new work by Deball inspired by the archaeological archives of the Fine Arts Museums of

Berlin-based artist Mariana Castillo Deball (b. Mexico City, 1975) reveals gaps in the often unquestioned narratives of museology and archaeology in a new exhibition at San Francisco Art Institute’s (SFAI) Walter and McBean Galleries this spring. The installation brings together new work by Deball inspired by the archaeological archives of the Fine Arts Museums of