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Chaos Eater (2021) by Andrew Roberts for Club Terremoto

MXN 25,000.00

NFT consisting of a digital object and a 3D printed interactive sculpture in resin mixed with sand and stone
17 x 47 x 17 cm / 6, 7 x 18, 5 x 6, 7 in
Edition of 15 + 5 Artist Proofs + 5 Workshop Proofs
Produced in collaboration with TAJO Taller, Mexico City

The purchase of this piece includes a courtesy membership to Club Terremoto 2021.
Click here to find out more about the benefits offered to Club Terremoto members.

Roberts’ point of departure in his recent work is a historical review of the parallel development of armed conflicts and the entertainment industry, analyzing the role of images as operational weapons within colonial, racial and extractivist schemes, and their poetic, political and aesthetic outcomes in the production of death and capital.

Roberts is currently researching the colonial foundations concealed in heroic fantasy through various ludic productions: videogames, collectible playing cards and role-playing games. The works spurred by this project explore the relations between magical thought and technological extractivism; between epic narratives and colonial expansion; between the categorization of fantastic creatures and eugenic ideas on race.

For this Club Terremoto edition, the artist presents a digital sculpture with its physical counterpart, referencing the Arthurian myth of the sword in the stone. In this story, Britain’s King Arthur acts as the bearer of divine forces by extracting Excalibur from a stone, legitimating his destiny as the chosen leader in the defense and expansion of his empire in the name of Christianity. Thus, history works as an imperialistic proto-discourse of colonial expansion, in which race, gender and sexual identity are motives to define whom is worthy of claiming ownership over others.

Chaos Eater is an exercise of tensions, where the sword is replaced by a weapon from the videogame Darksiders, and the stone by an Olmec sculpture. By confronting these objects, the piece operates as a catalyst for the discussion on the conquest and extermination of Pre-hispanic peoples, but also on persisting Postcolonial structures.

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