Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas
“Beatriz González: A Retrospective” at the MFAH, the first large scale U.S. exhibition dedicated to the work by the Colombian artist “Beatriz González: A Retrospective” at the MFAH, the first large scale U.S. exhibition dedicated to the work by the Colombian artist

“Beatriz González: A Retrospective” at the MFAH, the first large scale U.S. exhibition dedicated to the work by the Colombian artist

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Houston

Beatriz González: A Retrospective  The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston  Through January 20, 2020 1001 Bissonnet St, Houston, TX 77005, United States Para más información: MFAH Facebook / Instagram / Twitter Beatriz González: A Retrospective is the first large-scale U.S. exhibition dedicated to the work of Colombian artist Beatriz González, on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, from October

Beatriz González: A Retrospective  The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston  Through January 20, 2020 1001 Bissonnet St, Houston, TX 77005, United States Para más información: MFAH Facebook / Instagram / Twitter Beatriz González: A Retrospective is the first large-scale U.S. exhibition dedicated to the work of Colombian artist Beatriz González, on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, from October

Obsidian Ladder Obsidian Ladder

Obsidian Ladder

Donna Huanca

Marciano Art Foundation Los Angeles, California, USA 06/28/2019 – 12/01/2019

Marciano Art Foundation (MAF) presents Obsidian Ladder, the first large-scale solo exhibition in the United States by Bolivian American artist Donna Huanca. Huanca’s site-specific installation for MAF’s 13,000-square-foot Theater Gallery reveals a new topography of triggered senses, combining sound, scent, and live performance. These elements are experienced together against a constellation of carved steel sculptures and

Installation view of Donna Huanca: Obsidian Ladder (2019). Courtesy the artist, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles and Peres Projects, Berlin. Photo by Joshua White/JWPictures.com Installation view of Donna Huanca: Obsidian Ladder (2019). Courtesy the artist, Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles and Peres Projects, Berlin. Photo by Joshua White/JWPictures.com Installation view of Donna Huanca: Obsidian Ladder

Ni Aquí, Ni Allá

Ni Aquí, Ni Allá

Luz Carabaño

Dimensions Variable Miami, Florida, USA 05/11/2019 – 08/01/2019

Ni Aquí, Ni Allá is a selection of Carabaño’s work which showcases the in-between space her paintings inhabit. Displacement plays a central role in these images. They stand between our world in their naturalistic renderings and another in abstract ambiguous fields. The paintings are always rooted in something seen, yet they are distant from their

Luz Carabaño, Ni Aquí, Ni Allá (2019). Installation view. Photo by Francesco Casale Luz Carabaño, Ni Aquí, Ni Allá (2019). Installation view. Photo by Francesco Casale Luz Carabaño, Ni Aquí, Ni Allá (2019). Installation view. Photo by Francesco Casale Ni Aquí, Ni Allá is a selection of Carabaño’s work which showcases the in-between space her paintings inhabit. Displacement plays a central role in these

Pop América, 1965-1975 Pop América, 1965-1975

Pop América, 1965-1975

Curatorship by Esther Gabara

Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University Durham, North Carolina, USA 02/21/2019 – 07/21/2019

Despite the wide appeal of Pop art’s engaging imagery, the broader public remains unaware of the participation and significant contribution of Latin American and Latino/a artists working at the same time and alongside their U.S. and European counterparts. The Nasher Museum presents Pop América, 1965-1975, the first exhibition with a hemispheric vision of Pop. The exhibition

Antonio Caro, Colombia Coca-Cola (1976). Enamel on sheet metal. Collection of the MIT List Visual Arts Center. Image courtesy of the artist and Casas Riegner, Bogota, Colombia. © Antonio Caro Antonio Dias, The Illustration of Art/Uncovering the Cover-Up (1973). Screenprint and acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and Galeria Nara Roesler, New York, New

Darkness at Noon

Darkness at Noon

Javier M. Rodriguez

Proxyco New York, USA 05/03/2019 – 07/06/2019

“I have always wanted basically, to carry out investigations in the form of spectacle.” —Jean-Luc Godard The work of Javier M. Rodríguez focuses on questioning the formats and uses of the audiovisual apparatus, often borrowing content from narrative films to highlight the conventions and constructions of the cinematographic device. For this exhibition, the artist creates a

Javier M. Rodríguez, Last year at Capri (2019). Vista de instalación. Imagen cortesía del artista Javier M. Rodríguez, Totally Tenderly Tragically (2019). Vista de instalación. Imagen cortesía del artista Javier M. Rodríguez, Darkness at Noon (2019). Vista de instalación. Imagen cortesía del artista “Siempre quise, básicamente, hacer investigación en forma de espectáculo”. —Jean-Luc Godard El trabajo de Javier

Piss + Blood & Spunk: Seminal Works 1993-2019 Piss + Blood & Spunk: Seminal Works 1993-2019

Piss + Blood & Spunk: Seminal Works 1993-2019

Ruben Esparza

Tom of Finland Foundation Los Angeles, California, USA 06/08/2019 – 07/06/2019

Rubén Esparza combines the skills of a multi-media artist and the insight of a gifted curator to synergize intensely cross-referential artworks. Queer AIDS tropes, phallocentrism, and bodily fluids become markers of LGBTQ+ culture from the early ’90s to the contemporary Trumpian zeitgeist. GLoves (Blood Drive), a 1995 triptych, epitomizes many themes of Esparza’s oeuvre. The artist,

Rubén Esparza, Yooth n Treets (2016). Courtesy of the artist ©Rubén Esparza Rubén Esparza, Missing (Russell David Liebert) (2019). Courtesy of the artist ©Rubén Esparza Rubén Esparza, Jeff in Blue and Gold (2019). Courtesy of the artist ©Rubén Esparza Rubén Esparza combines the skills of a multi-media artist and the insight of a gifted curator

Twilight Chorus Twilight Chorus

Twilight Chorus

Co-curated with guadalajara90210

The Chimney New York, USA 05/31/2019 – 07/14/2019

As the sun recedes below the horizon, a soft and uncertain glowing light permeates the landscape. The twilight—an in-between and temporally ambiguous moment—only lasts a few minutes. At this time, the small and almost invisible creatures of the natural realm become most active: they leave their hiding place to bustle into the night and dance

Mariana Garibay Raeke, You feel like salt (2019). Steel, reed, ixtle, salt. Image courtesy of The Chimney Héctor Jiménez Castillo, Rrrrrrrrrrradio (2019). Painted PVC boxes. Image courtesy of The Chimney Ilana Harris-Babou, Untitled Lamp from Reparation Hardware (2018). Ceramic, apoxy resin & lamp.  Image courtesy of The Chimney As the sun recedes below the horizon, a soft

Tunnelscape Tunnelscape

Tunnelscape

Michael Ray-Von

New Works + sodA mundial Chicago, Illinois, USA 05/04/2019 – 06/22/2019

Picture yourself flying through clouds in an enormous flute of clear glass. You’re flying over the American landscape: a passenger in a glass flute. You feel the breeze blow in through the many finger holes; and you try to count the holes, but you only count: 1, 1, 1, 1. Suddenly, the whole flute whistles,

Michael Ray-Von, All the lights are green in paradise (2019). Ed. 1/5, 60 cards. Image courtesy of  sodA mundial Michael Ray-Von, How many cops is this? (2019). Mixed technique. Image courtesy of  sodA mundial Michael Ray-Von, Acid traffic (2019). Brass, copper, plastic, resin, glass, acetate prints. Image courtesy of  sodA mundial Picture yourself flying through clouds in an enormous flute of

Unraveling Collective Forms Unraveling Collective Forms

Unraveling Collective Forms

Curated by Daniela Lieja Quintanar

LACE Los Angeles, California, USA 04/03/2019 – 05/26/2019

A Quipu or Khipu is a device made of dyed, knotted threads—an ancient Inka, multisensory, extinct language, quipus are the vanished narratives of resistance that this exhibition and public programming. Unraveling Collective Forms knots together artistic reflections centered around collectivity, autonomy, and group manifestations that crack systems. Artist Cecilia Vicuña defines a quipu as “a poem in space, a way to remember, involving the body

Performance Stranger’s Union organized by Arshia Haq, as part of Unraveling Collective Forms. Courtesy of the artists. Photo by Tina June Malek View of exhibition Unraveling Collective Forms at LACE. Courtesy of the artists. Photo by Christopher Wormald View of exhibition Unraveling Collective Forms at LACE. Courtesy of the artists. Photo by Christopher Wormald Desenredar

Hólǫ́—it xistz

Hólǫ́—it xistz

Eric-Paul Riege

ICA Miami Miami, Florida, USA 05/18/2019 – 11/03/2019

Eric Paul Riege: Hólǫ́—it xistz is the first institutional exhibition dedicated to the work of the emerging Navajo artist. Activating the long-held Navajo tradition of weaving and drawing from the mythical stories that are bound to this tradition, Riege generates stories through woven wearables, looms, thread, ephemeral architectures, and durational performances. Riege’s work also celebrates,

Eric-Paul Riege, study 2 for Hólǫ́—it xistz (2018). Digital collage. Courtesy the artist Eric-Paul Riege, Hólǫ́—it xistz (2019). Installation view. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio Eric-Paul Riege, Hólǫ́—it xistz (2019). Installation view. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio Eric Paul Riege: Hólǫ́—it xistz is the first institutional exhibition dedicated to the work of the emerging Navajo artist. Activating the