Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas
cadena perpetua

cadena perpetua

ektor garcia

SculptureCenter New York, USA 05/23/2019 – 07/29/2019

ektor garcia’s work looks like things meant to connect other things, like fasteners, loops, and knots. By extension, it can look like lengths of rope and chain. His clay, metal, and leather elements conjoin loosely across many works and travel between studio and gallery spaces in changing configurations: one exhibition, clipped off with wire cutters,

Installation view, ektor garcia: cadena perpetua, SculptureCenter, New York, 2019. Photo: Kyle Knodell Installation view, ektor garcia: cadena perpetua, SculptureCenter, New York, 2019. Photo: Kyle Knodell ektor garcia, trio, 2018, installation view. Steel rings, corocheted artificial sinew, inner tube rubber, latex, obsidian. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Kyle Knodell ektor garcia’s work looks like things meant to connect

Darkness at Noon

Darkness at Noon

Javier M. Rodriguez

Proxyco New York, USA 05/03/2019 – 07/06/2019

“I have always wanted basically, to carry out investigations in the form of spectacle.” —Jean-Luc Godard The work of Javier M. Rodríguez focuses on questioning the formats and uses of the audiovisual apparatus, often borrowing content from narrative films to highlight the conventions and constructions of the cinematographic device. For this exhibition, the artist creates a

Javier M. Rodríguez, Last year at Capri (2019). Vista de instalación. Imagen cortesía del artista Javier M. Rodríguez, Totally Tenderly Tragically (2019). Vista de instalación. Imagen cortesía del artista Javier M. Rodríguez, Darkness at Noon (2019). Vista de instalación. Imagen cortesía del artista “Siempre quise, básicamente, hacer investigación en forma de espectáculo”. —Jean-Luc Godard El trabajo de Javier

Twilight Chorus Twilight Chorus

Twilight Chorus

Co-curated with guadalajara90210

The Chimney New York, USA 05/31/2019 – 07/14/2019

As the sun recedes below the horizon, a soft and uncertain glowing light permeates the landscape. The twilight—an in-between and temporally ambiguous moment—only lasts a few minutes. At this time, the small and almost invisible creatures of the natural realm become most active: they leave their hiding place to bustle into the night and dance

Mariana Garibay Raeke, You feel like salt (2019). Steel, reed, ixtle, salt. Image courtesy of The Chimney Héctor Jiménez Castillo, Rrrrrrrrrrradio (2019). Painted PVC boxes. Image courtesy of The Chimney Ilana Harris-Babou, Untitled Lamp from Reparation Hardware (2018). Ceramic, apoxy resin & lamp.  Image courtesy of The Chimney As the sun recedes below the horizon, a soft

TANSTAAFL: There’s no such thing as a free lunch & Division Lamp TANSTAAFL: There’s no such thing as a free lunch & Division Lamp

TANSTAAFL: There’s no such thing as a free lunch & Division Lamp

Ignacio Gatica and Gregory Kalliche

Interstate Projects Brooklyn, New York, USA 04/05/2019 – 05/05/2019

TANSTAAFL: There’s no such thing as a free lunch For his first US solo exhibition, Ignacio Gatica presents TANSTAAFL: There’s no such thing as a free lunch, a new series of work that maps out distinct forms of technology and quotidian interfaces throughout the gallery space. The aphorism the show takes as its title was

Ignacio Gatica, TANSTAAFL: There’s no such thing as a free lunch (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of the artist Ignacio Gatica, TANSTAAFL: There’s no such thing as a free lunch (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of the artist TANSTAAFL: There’s no such thing as a free lunch For his first US solo exhibition, Ignacio Gatica presents TANSTAAFL: There’s no

Sangre y Sol

Sangre y Sol

Sara Mejia Kriendler

The Chimney Brooklyn, New York, USA 03/15/2019 – 05/05/2019

What myth do you live by? —Joseph Campbell In Sangre y Sol, Sara Mejia Kriendler’s first solo exhibition at The Chimney, the Colombian-American artist juxtaposes two large scale sculptures that explore the conflict between the sacred and the profane, the disposable and the everlasting, the earthly and the otherworldly. In 2015, Kriendler returned to Colombia for

Sara Mejia Kriendler, Sangre (2019). Terracotta. Courtesy of the artist and The Chimney. Photography by Reggie Shiobara Sara Mejia Kriendler, Sol (2019). Gold foil. Courtesy of the artist and The Chimney. Photography by Reggie Shiobara Sara Mejia Kriendler, Sangre (2019). Terracotta. Courtesy of the artist and The Chimney. Photography by Reggie Shiobara What myth do you

Bodega Run Bodega Run

Bodega Run

Tschabalala Self

Hammer Museum Los Angeles, California, USA 02/02/2019 – 04/28/2019

It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others. —W. E. B. Du Bois New York City is a patchwork quilt of distinct neighborhoods spread across all five boroughs and punctuated by renowned cultural and historic landmarks—the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty,

Hammer Projects: Tschabalala Self, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Photo: Joshua White Tschabalala Self, Bodega Run Diptych, 2017. Acrylic, watercolor, flashe, gouache, colored pencil, pencil, hand-colored photocopy, hand-colored canvas on canvas. Collection of the Luma Foundation, New York Tschabalala Self, Bodega Run, installation view, Pilar Corrias Gallery, London, September 7—27, 2017 It is a

Told and Untold

Told and Untold

Kati Horna

Americas Society / Council of the Americas New York, USA 09/13/2016 – 12/17/2016

Renowned for her innovative images documenting Mexico City’s urban expansion and vibrant cultural scene, Kati Horna (Budapest, 1912 – Mexico City, 2000) was already a widely published photographer of the Spanish Civil War when she arrived in Mexico at the end of 1939. Her prolific career is the focus of the exhibition Told and Untold:

Renowned for her innovative images documenting Mexico City’s urban expansion and vibrant cultural scene, Kati Horna (Budapest, 1912 – Mexico City, 2000) was already a widely published photographer of the Spanish Civil War when she arrived in Mexico at the end of 1939. Her prolific career is the focus of the exhibition Told and Untold: