Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas
Candelilla, Coatlicue, and the Breathing Machine Candelilla, Coatlicue, and the Breathing Machine

Candelilla, Coatlicue, and the Breathing Machine

Beatriz Cortez, Candice Lin and Fernando Palma Rodríguez

Ballroom Marfa Marfa, Texas, USA April 5, 2019 – September 8, 2019

Ballroom Marfa presents Candelilla, Coatlicue, and the Breathing Machine, an exhibition with newly commissioned and existing works by Beatriz Cortez, Candice Lin, and Fernando Palma Rodríguez. The title refers to a facet of each artist’s sculptural contribution to the show, which range from wax pours to robotic storytellers to provisional shelters and beyond. The disparate

Fernando Palma Rodríguez, Xipetotec (2018). Stone metates, electronic circuits and sensors. Courtesy the artist, Ballroom Marfa, and House of Gaga Photo by Alex Marks Beatriz Cortez, One Hundred and Four Point Hood Shield (2019). Steel, car hood sections, zip ties. Courtesy the artist, Ballroom Marfa, and Commonwealth and Council Commissioned by Ballroom Marfa Photo by

Hyperobjects: Group show at Ballroom Marfa, Texas, USA Hyperobjects: Group show at Ballroom Marfa, Texas, USA

Hyperobjects: Group show at Ballroom Marfa, Texas, USA

By Saúl Hernández-Vargas Marfa, Texas, USA 04/13/2018 – 11/04/2018

The desert, neither uninhabited nor alone: Notes on Hyperobjects, curated by Timothy Morton and Laura Copelin For Cristina Compared to their Chinese and Mesoamerican counterparts, western astronomers were late in observing a wide range of celestial phenomena. It wasn’t until the sixteenth century that Nicolaus Copernicus, drawing on discoveries made by Arab astronomers at the

Emilija Skarnulyte, Sirenomelia, 2018. Video, único canal HD, loop. Imagen cortesía de la artista y Ballroom Marfa. Foto: Alex Marks El desierto, ni deshabitado ni solo: notas sobre Hyperobjects, curada por Timothy Morthon y Laura Copelin Para Cristina A diferencia de los astrónomos chinos, y mesoamericanos, los astrónomos occidentales tardaron en observar la gran variedad de fenómenos

Tierra. Sangre. Oro. Tierra. Sangre. Oro.

Tierra. Sangre. Oro.

A project by Rafa Esparza

Ballroom Marfa Marfa, Texas, USA 08/25/2017 – 03/18/2018

Tierra. Sangre. Oro. is a group exhibition envisioned by Rafa Esparza that includes new work by Carmen Argote, Beatriz Cortez, Esparza, Timo Fahler, Eamon Ore-Giron; new and existing photographs by Star Montana; a major body of work by Nao Bustamante; the contributions of adoberos/artists Sandro Cánovas, Maria Garcia, Ruben Rodriguez, as well as many hands from the community

Installation view: (on top) Eamon Ore-Giron, Talking Shit With Quetzalcoatl/ I Like Mexico and Mexico Likes Me, 2017. Wool, copper, adobe. Courtesy the artist; (on the bottom) Rafa Esparza, Raised Adobe Ground for Talking Shit With Quetzalcoatl, 2017. Adobe. Courtesy the artist. Image courtesy of Ballroom Marfa. Carmen Argote, Hunting and Gathering, 2017. Acrylic on muslin fabric, cardboard

Äppärät Äppärät

Äppärät

Curated by Tom Morton

Ballroom Marfa Marfa, Texas, USA 09/25/2015 – 02/14/2016

This is a show about the mammalian hand, and the tools it touches, holds and uses. Taking its title from the name of a fictional, post-iPhone device at the centre of Gary Shteyngart’s 2010 near-future novel Super Sad True Love Story, Äppärät is concerned with labor, play and the uncertain zone between the two; with

This is a show about the mammalian hand, and the tools it touches, holds and uses. Taking its title from the name of a fictional, post-iPhone device at the centre of Gary Shteyngart’s 2010 near-future novel Super Sad True Love Story, Äppärät is concerned with labor, play and the uncertain zone between the two; with