Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas
Forging Territories: Queer Afro and Latinx Contemporary Art Forging Territories: Queer Afro and Latinx Contemporary Art

Forging Territories: Queer Afro and Latinx Contemporary Art

Curated by Rubén Esparza

San Diego Art Institute San Diego, California, USA 06/29/2019 – 11/03/2019

Musings on a Blacktino Critical Optic The year 2019 marks a watershed moment in LGBTQ history as museums and cultural institutions across the country commemorate the fifty-year anniversary of Stonewall, that raucous riot where queers fought back at intrepid police raids at Stonewall Inn in New York’s Greenwich Village in 1969. As with all cultural

Patrisse Cullors, Untitled (2019). Performance for opening night. ©Patrisse Cullors. Photo by ©Philipp Scholz Ritterman and ©Tim Hardy Alma Lopez, Santa, Lucia, Santa Wilgerfortis, Julia Pastrana (2014). ©Alma Lopez. Photo by ©Philipp Scholz Ritterman and ©Tim Hardy Vinnie Garcia, 2nd Puberty (2019). Immersive installation. ©Vinnie Garcia. Photo by ©Philipp Scholz Ritterman and ©Tim Hardy Reflexiones Sobre

Mírame

Mírame

by Joey Terrill

A cross-generational narrative of queer Chicanx and Latinx artists finds a common space in LA. I don’t attempt a critique of Pacific Standard Time or the myriad queer Latinx works that will be presented in it. What I offer instead is a personal reflection as a gay Chicano artist who is beginning to be considered an “elder” in the queer community, an

A cross-generational narrative of queer Chicanx and Latinx artists finds a common space in LA. Gabriel Garcia Roman, Carlos & Fernando, 2015. Silkscreen print. Photo courtesy of the artist. I don’t attempt a critique of Pacific Standard Time or the myriad queer Latinx works that will be presented in it. What I offer instead is a personal reflection as

Queer Califas Queer Califas

Queer Califas

Curated by Ruben Esparza

Plummer Park Los Angeles 11/04/2017 – 12/09/2017

There is a thread that connects Latinx people. It is a strong soulful link, which is indelible. A lineage that carries the rhythm of varied cultures. Many are newcomers to this country cutting new paths. Some are from centuries-long histories from both colonizer and the colonized—with Spanish and Portuguese surnames cloaking indigenous and African heritage.

Exhibition view of Queer Califas, 2017. Courtesy of Plummer Park Rigo Maldonado, Heart, 2016. Courtesy of Plummer Park Exhibition view of Queer Califas, 2017. Courtesy of Plummer Park There is a thread that connects Latinx people. It is a strong soulful link, which is indelible. A lineage that carries the rhythm of varied cultures. Many are

Queerly Tèhuäntin | Cuir Us

Queerly Tèhuäntin | Cuir Us

Yolanda Andrade, Naomi Rincón Gallardo, Ester Hernández, and more...

Galería de la Raza San Francisco, California, USA 08/11/2017 – 10/07/2017

Galería de la Raza presents Queerly Tèhuäntin | Cuir Us, a visual dialogue across borders and generations about the ongoing struggle to be simultaneously Mexican or Chicanx and queer, that is, to be who we are. To be queerly tèhuäntin, Nahuatl for “us”. To be queerly us, queer or cuir -as the term is increasingly used in Spanish- in the sense of nonconventional sexualities and

Yolanda Andrade, Las Alas Del Deseo, 1993. Archival Pigment Print. 18 ½” x 12 ½”. Courtesy of Galería de la Raza. Installation view: Ester Hernández, La Ofrenda, 1990. Screenprint. 29 ½” x 21”. Courtesy of Galería de la Raza. Rurru Mipanochia, Tlaltecuhtli 1, 2017. Acrylic, stylograph, and markers on amate paper. 28” x 23”. Courtesy of Galería de