Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas
Where the Sea Remembers Where the Sea Remembers

Where the Sea Remembers

Curated by César García-Alvarez, Nicolas Orozco-Valdivia and Kris Kuramitsu

The Mistake Room Los Angeles, California, USA July 13, 2019 – October 12, 2019

The Mistake Room presents Where The Sea Remembers, an interdisciplinary project comprised of an exhibition, a program series, and a website that explores Vietnamese contemporary art. This project marks the launch of an institutional restrictions on foreign investments, the privatization of state-owned enterprises, and the arrival of multinational corporate conglomerates, Vietnam also softened its borders—allowing for expanded

Where the Sea Remembers (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of The Mistake Room Where the Sea Remembers (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of The Mistake Room Where the Sea Remembers (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of The Mistake Room The Mistake Room presents Where The Sea Remembers, an interdisciplinary project comprised of an exhibition, a program

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 at The Broad, Los Angeles, USA Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 at The Broad, Los Angeles, USA

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 at The Broad, Los Angeles, USA

By Brandon Drew Holmes Los Angeles, California, USA 03/23/2019 – 09/01/2019

Something predictable happens when white institutions exhibit Black artworks. It doesn’t matter what the artist’s original intentions were or what statements the work speaks on its own. Somehow both artist and work become simplified of their emotions and reality. This expectation of erasure is not surprising, it’s the conscious affect of the Western institution built

Vista de instalación de Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983, en The Broad, Los Ángeles. Foto: Pablo Enriquez. Imagen cortesía de The Broad Algo predecible sucede cuando las instituciones blancas exhiben obras de arte Negras. No importa cuáles fueron las intenciones originales de lxs artistas o qué declaraciones hablan a

Coffee, Rhum, Sugar & Gold: A Postcolonial Paradox

Coffee, Rhum, Sugar & Gold: A Postcolonial Paradox

Curated by Dexter Wimberly and Larry Ossei-Mensah

Museum of the African Diaspora San Francisco, California, USA 05/08/2019 – 08/11/2019

“Those alive to ever-present signifiers of enslavement and colonialism have to look no further than the average bottle of rum. For the labels either contain supposedly comforting artistic renderings of benevolent plantation scenes, or these labels boldly and proudly declare that the product has a centuries-old manufacturing pedigree. We don’t have to do much speculating

Firelei Báez, How to slip out of your body quietly (2018). Acrylic and oil on paper. Collection of Alyssa and Gregory Shannon Angel Otero, Veranda (Sca02), (2013). Fired Steel and glazed porcelain. Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupi Firelei Báez, Love that does not choose you (Collapse the rooms and structures that depend on you to hold

Kiss the Hand You Cannot Bite Kiss the Hand You Cannot Bite

Kiss the Hand You Cannot Bite

Pio Abad

KADIST San Francisco, California, USA 06/05/2019 – 08/10/2019

Culminating his residency at KADIST San Francisco, Kiss the Hand You Cannot Bite is Pio Abad’s first solo exhibition in the United States. The newly commissioned body of work draws from multiple histories of exile, resistance, and displacement from the ’70s and ’80s that brought Filipinos to California, home to one of the largest diasporas of

Pio Abad, a selection from the series Untitled (Bolerium) (2019). Digital photocopies. Image courtesy of KADIST Pio Abad, Kiss the Hand You Cannot Bite (2019). Cast concrete. Photo by Jeff Warrin Pio Abad, For Gene (2019), For Silme (2019). Acrylic on canvas. Photo by Jeff Warrin Culminating his residency at KADIST San Francisco, Kiss the

Unraveling Collective Forms Unraveling Collective Forms

Unraveling Collective Forms

Curated by Daniela Lieja Quintanar

LACE Los Angeles, California, USA 04/03/2019 – 05/26/2019

A Quipu or Khipu is a device made of dyed, knotted threads—an ancient Inka, multisensory, extinct language, quipus are the vanished narratives of resistance that this exhibition and public programming. Unraveling Collective Forms knots together artistic reflections centered around collectivity, autonomy, and group manifestations that crack systems. Artist Cecilia Vicuña defines a quipu as “a poem in space, a way to remember, involving the body

Performance Stranger’s Union organized by Arshia Haq, as part of Unraveling Collective Forms. Courtesy of the artists. Photo by Tina June Malek View of exhibition Unraveling Collective Forms at LACE. Courtesy of the artists. Photo by Christopher Wormald View of exhibition Unraveling Collective Forms at LACE. Courtesy of the artists. Photo by Christopher Wormald Desenredar

Fetish King: Seminal Photographs 1986-2019 Fetish King: Seminal Photographs 1986-2019

Fetish King: Seminal Photographs 1986-2019

Rick Castro

Tom of Finland Foundation Los Angeles, California, USA 04/06/2019 – 04/27/2019

Curated by Ruben Esparza Born in Los Angeles in 1958, Rick Castro began his early career working as a fashion stylist and clothing designer. His clients over the years have included Bette Midler, David Bowie, Herb Ritts, Joel-Peter Witkin and magazines like Interview, GQ, Rolling Stone, and Vanity Fair. Castro first became a freelance photographer

Rick Castro, Fetish King: Seminal Photographs 1986-2019. Installation view at Tom of Finland Foundation, 2019. Image courtesy of the artist Rick Castro, Fetish King: Seminal Photographs 1986-2019. Installation view at Tom of Finland Foundation. Image courtesy of the artist Rick Castro, Fetish King: Seminal Photographs 1986-2019. Installation view at Tom of Finland Foundation. Image courtesy

Bodega Run Bodega Run

Bodega Run

Tschabalala Self

Hammer Museum Los Angeles, California, USA 02/02/2019 – 04/28/2019

It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others. —W. E. B. Du Bois New York City is a patchwork quilt of distinct neighborhoods spread across all five boroughs and punctuated by renowned cultural and historic landmarks—the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty,

Hammer Projects: Tschabalala Self, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Photo: Joshua White Tschabalala Self, Bodega Run Diptych, 2017. Acrylic, watercolor, flashe, gouache, colored pencil, pencil, hand-colored photocopy, hand-colored canvas on canvas. Collection of the Luma Foundation, New York Tschabalala Self, Bodega Run, installation view, Pilar Corrias Gallery, London, September 7—27, 2017 It is a

Take My Money / Take My Body Take My Money / Take My Body

Take My Money / Take My Body

Curated by Narei Choi and Nicolas Orozco-Valdivia

LACE Los Angeles, California, USA 01/03/2019 – 02/24/2019

Featuring artists: Peggy Ahwesh, Olivia Campbell, Jiwon Choi, Mike Grimm, Han Sol Ip, Gelare Khoshgozaran, Ahmet Öğüt, Levi Orta, and Chung Qin In Take My Money / Take My Body, K-Pop is an entry point for a question about the promises of popular media within highly bureaucratic, surveilled, and macro-scaled communities such as corporations / nations. Whether a data-mining social platform, exploitative culture industry, or resurgent

Exhibition view Take My Money/Take My Body, LACE Emerging Curators Program 2019. Courtesy of LACE. Photo by Chris Wormald Detail of Objet petit aby Han Sol Ip & Chung Qin, from exhibition Take My Money/Take My Body, LACE Emerging Curators Program 2019. Courtesy of LACE. Photo by Chris Wormald Exhibition view Take My Money/Take My

Topologies of Excess: A Survey of Contemporary Practices from Puerto Rico Topologies of Excess: A Survey of Contemporary Practices from Puerto Rico

Topologies of Excess: A Survey of Contemporary Practices from Puerto Rico

Curated by Mariola Rosario and Emma Saperstein

Harold J. Miossi Art Gallery, Cuesta College San Luis Obispo, California, USA 01/31/2019 – 02/27/2019

“Here, however, we cannot avoid the tide. The island is tidal. The tide enjoys control, arguably more than the people she surrounds. You can only get on and off when the water lets you. The tide can physically stop you.” —Julie Crawshaw and Menelaos Gkartzios, The way art works: descriptions of community governance Ex·cess: the state

Installation view, Topologies of Excess: A Survey of Contemporary Practices from Puerto Rico at Harold J. Miossi Art Gallery, Cuesta College, California, 2019. Image courtesy of the artists Installation view, Topologies of Excess: A Survey of Contemporary Practices from Puerto Rico at Harold J. Miossi Art Gallery, Cuesta College, California, 2019. Image courtesy of the artists Installation

Tamborine Tamborine

Tamborine

Kenneth Tam

Commonwealth and Council Los Angeles, California, USA 01/19/2019 – 03/02/2019

Tamborine presents Kenneth Tam’s recent work dealing with rituals of masculinity and their capacity to both reinforce and disrupt conventional norms. Rites of passage initiate young men into social codes of adulthood, giving them the chance to test out their mature selves and rehearse normative patterns of behavior. But they also open a space of vulnerability

Kenneth Tam, All of M. Video still. Image courtesy of Commonwealth and Council Kenneth Tam, Tamborine (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of Commonwealth and Council Kenneth Tam, All of M. Video still. Image courtesy of Common Wealth and Council Tamborine presents Kenneth Tam’s recent work dealing with rituals of masculinity and their capacity to both reinforce and disrupt conventional norms.