Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Si tú vivieras aquí: Martha Rosler en Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, Santiago de Chile

Por Kati Lincopil Santiago de Chile July 26, 2019 – October 13, 2019

Martha Rosler, Si tú vivieras aquí, exhibition view at MAC Chile, 2019. Photo: Sebastián Mejía. Image courtesy of MAC Chile

Remember, we can all be replaced

One of the sites of the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo of Santiago (MAC), Chile is located in Parque Forestal, on the south riverbank of the Mapocho, in city downtown. Families of different composition, size, and nationality seize the opportunity to stroll around. Some renounce the sunny afternoon to explore the cold interior of the MAC, the unpopular siamese brother of the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes [National Museum of Fine Arts], with which it shares a building.

In the first floor, you can find Si tú vivieras aquí, the first retrospective show of the US American artist Martha Rosler (Brooklyn, 1943) in Latin America curated by Mariagrazia Muscatello and Montserrat Rojas Corradi, within the context of the second edition of BIENALSUR—the International Biennial of Contemporary Art in South America—as it is announced by the large white letters inscribed outside Room 1, along with a list of national artists invited to dialogue with Rosler’s works: Claudia del Fierro, Cristóbal Cea, Bárbara Oettinger, Bernardo Oyarzún, Voluspa Jarpa, and Máximo Corvalán-Pincheira.

“Who is Martha Rosler?”, ask themselves quietly those who dared to enter the museum. When crossing the threshold they find In the place of the public: Airport, which occupies the first two walls which collide in straight angles. Eight photographs of the series, that show the bleak interiors of the USA and German airports, hygienic and standardized borders, presented in a straight line on both white walls,  surrounded by phrases of different sizes, in black letter, as if the floated: 

control total 

imagen brillante de desalojo

regímenes del escrutinio

No digo mapa, no digo territorio

fantasías de escape [1]

To the left, a flat-screen reproduces a slide of photographs of the ongoing project Air Fare, a series of shots of the meals offered in first-class flights: deformed miniatures, pathetic and industrialized versions, cheese and grape boards, duck à l’orange, crême brûlée. Almost nonexistent portions of caviar accompanied by small glasses of champagne, that the low quality of the shots turn even more depressing and ridiculous. 

Martha Rosler, Si tú vivieras aquí, exhibition view at MAC Chile, 2019. Photo: Sebastián Mejía. Image courtesy of MAC Chile

Two very young women, one with short pink hair and the other with blue long hair, stop in front of the television for a moment, they whisper briefly, and then, head impatiently towards the wood bench placed in front of an old television that reproduces the 1983 video, A Simple Case for Torture, or How to Sleep at Night. The two headphones available are occupied by a woman and her small child. The boy is barely three years old, the mother tries hard to put on the headphones and, with a Venezuelan accent, asks him to stay calm. After she manages to accommodate him, they look for a few moments at Rosler’s hands moving and overlapping written press clippings about the US intervention in Latin America, the one that caused the coup d’etats, denouncing its implicit support of torture, human rights violations. In an hour-long recording, Rosler shows exhaustive bibliographic documentation of the political and economic consequences in said countries, the manipulation of information and pride of the US Americans. Meanwhile, the voice of a man explains philosophy and politics in English. The video doesn’t have Spanish subtitles. 

There is a loud bang in the room that causes several people to be distracted from the readings of the enlarged reproductions of Tijuana Maid (the original text from 1978 and re-adapted this year), one of the Postcard Novels of Service: a Trilogy on Colonization, in which a Mexican woman who emigrated from Tijuana to San Diego recount, in first person, the experience of crossing the border illegally, to then, work as a maid, being victim of abuse and discrimination, while, at the same time, being an object of exoticization and a reason for contempt by her employers. “Will you cook a Mexican dinner for us sometimes?”, says one of the postcards that gather fragments of recipes and common phrases of the Home Maid Spanish Cookbook, the bilingual bestseller that tries to coach the Spanish-speaking domestic service in the customs of the US American family. “The rich don’t like to eat the food of the poor”, asserts the story’s protagonist. The testimony problematizes how extreme xenophobia merged with the cultural and physical devotion of immigrants/invaders, held and enslaved in the intimacy of the bourgeois family.

The child lies on the floor, the headphones far away, and the mother rushes to pick him up. Rosler keeps moving her clippings on the screen, showing books. The mother and the child move away from interventionism, torture, politics, and philosophy.

The characteristic tune of Star Wars that musicalizes the parody video Chile On the Road to NAFTA (1997), performed by Escuela de Suboficiales de Carabineros [Instrumental Band of the Carabineros Petty Officer School], fills the room. The projection light is weak and fails to overcome the lighting of the place. The images of rural Chile in the nineties and the giant poster of a huge arm that wields a can of Coca-Cola, located in the middle of deserted land, allude to how Chile went from a socialist government to becoming the “neoliberal laboratory” of Latin America. Star Wars, the fist, mule-drawn carts, the epic trumpets, Coca-Cola. The installation can’t but cause a melancholy laugh.

Martha Rosler, Si tú vivieras aquí, exhibition view at MAC Chile, 2019. Photo: Sebastián Mejía. Image courtesy of MAC Chile

Two ladies are surprised to see that the work is about Chile. They are surprised to see themselves presented and observed by the producer and observer from the US, the world’s viewpoint.

Claudia del Fierro (Santiago, 1974) occupies the Southeast corner of the museum, turning its back on the Andes Mountains. Her work Políticamente correcto [Politically Correct] (2001-2019) is a video performance reproduced in two simultaneous projections. In one, we see Del Fierro walk along a path towards the neighboring projection to then return. In the second, dressed as one of the seamstresses of a clothing factory, we see how she manages to enter and leave the place with the rest of the workers, without anyone noticing that she does not work there. Del Fierro “disguises” as a textile worker to meddle in their world. On the floor, lightly lit, uniforms, costumes, are stacked. Outside, a flat-screen reproduces the montage of images of immigrants crossing the border of first world countries, interspersed with violent red flashes, which make up the piece Who Said We Did Not Know (2018) by Barbara Oettinger (Santiago, 1981), the only artist who does not refer to Chile. Next to it, the three biometric photographs of a “mestizo” face, together with a reproduction of a spoken portrait of similar features, exceed two meters high and are part of the iconic work Bajo sospecha [Under Suspicion] by Bernardo Oyarzún (Los Muermos, 1963). The face portrayed in the blowups is that of the artist, who in 1998 was arrested by the police and unjustly accused of having committed an assault. Oyarzún reflects on the criminalization of his Mapuche features, offering his face to scrutiny, to trial. The presence of this work reminds us that in Chile racism and classism persist as a consequence of the Colony. An echo in popular culture that points to this is the critical humor program Plan Z, which in the 1990s parodied this situation with a sitcom called Mapuches millonarios [Millionaire Mapuches]. An absolute contradiction in Chile. “Sometimes I think I should dye my hair black and change my last name,” regrets in a scene the white and colorful maid of the Mapuche family represented in Plan Z.

Oyarzún also presents 164 photographic portraits of people with some blood affiliation with himself titled La parentela o por la causa [The Kinship or The Cause]. The racist typification of the Mapuche trait emerges in the bridge of a nose, the shape of the neck, the flesh of the lips, the color of the skin, something that for many generations was and remains a cause for shame. Having the face of the poor, of a criminal. Having a “maid face”, as they shouted in an edition of Lollapalloza to the Chilean musician Anita Tijoux.

On the wall a text recites:

Tiene la piel negra,
como un atacameño
el pelo duro,
los labios gruesos
prepotentes
mentón amplio,
frente estrecha,
como sin cerebro.
[2]

They are the scars of the original sin. The portraits are a mirror, they reflect us. Their “kinship” is also ours. 

Martha Rosler, Si tú vivieras aquí, exhibition view at MAC Chile, 2019. Photo: Sebastián Mejía. Image courtesy of MAC Chile

The amount of written information contained in the following room could make up a huge book. Informe Rettig [Retting Report] (2017), by Máximo Corvalán-Pincheira (Santiago, 1977 ), installs three volumes of the Informe de la Comisión de Verdad y Reconciliación [Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report] intervened with fire on the wall until it almost disappears. The work recovers the stories of political prisoners in the Chilean dictatorship. Next to it, Secuenciación del azul marino [Navy Blue Sequencing] (2017) and White Page Sequencing present sheets of the telephone book of Santiago and New York, respectively. The first intervened with blue watercolor is an allegory to the people killed by the dictatorship as they were launched into the Pacific Ocean. They are the only pieces of the exhibition that try to explain and contextualize themselves by means of a text inscribed on the wall, which some stop to read, casually glancing at the pieces. Beside them, part of the project by Voluspa Jarpa (Rancagua, 1971), La biblioteca de la no historia [The Library of the Non-History], works around the declassification by the US Secret Service of more than 200 thousand documents referring to Chile. A closed declassification: 70% of the information was crossed out, erased, perpetuating the trauma.

The spectators surround the works, they partially read. An older man with bifocals sticks his nose in the documents, frowning. Tilts the head. Textual information is unfathomable, as unquestionable is the history of horror. In these works, erase, cross out, sink the individual’s stories and their names, alludes to the disappearance and torture of their bodies. But, on the other hand, their dehumanization. For the dictatorship, the subjects must be Others, forgotten, or else disappeared. The murder of opponents is a desperate attempt to erase their existence, where citizens and their history are only data, replaceable versions. But recovering the “data” is not an empty statement, it is to inscribe on paper, and thus, in memory, the presence in the world of those who were tried to be extinguished. It is to remember and recover the place of the only thing we have left of them.

Separated from the Chilean works, the last room returns to Rosler’s work. As the afternoon falls, the humidity inside penetrates the bones. Only some people manage to reach this last moment. In this room, works that have been classified as feminists predominate, nevertheless, from the close perspective of white feminism which has homogenized the identity of cisgender women, leaving in the background their social, ethnic, territorial and class inscription. A place of enunciation of discourses and production of images that goes beyond the thematization of the works or the installation of the topics associated with “the feminine” in it, where, as in these works, there is a critical visibility to superficial sexist stereotypes, without further reflection.

The voices of the mother and son of the video Domination and the Everyday (1978) share space with the photomontages of the popular series House Beautiful: Bringing the War Home (1967-1972), returning to the issue of the media invasion in private spaces, denouncing indifference; on the power of information. A loop of the parodic Semiotic of The Kitchen (1975) is presented over a plinth, this is the only video that contains subtitles in Spanish, a small fissure in the English language tyranny going through the exhibition over the works and identification cards. On the other end, Martha Rosler Reads Vogue (1982), in which through the headphones we can hear the voice of the artist asking and answering while browsing the magazine: “What is Vogue, what is fashion. It is glamour, it is excitement, drama, wishing…” On another wall, the photographs of the singer-songwriter Víctor Jara (San Ignacio, 1932) Manifestación en la vía pública (Vietnam Solidarity Campaign) of 1968 share the space with the text in Spanish La restauración de la alta cultura en Chile [The Restoration of High Culture in Chile] (1977) by Rosler. The text delivers a brutal line: “The meeting appears on Television or at least those who had access to television, after the coup—as the New York Times states—to remind the people of Chile: ‘Remember, you can be replaced’”. The work coexists spatially with photographs of transients and workers of the series Cuba (1981) and Chile (1995). We, the replaceable. 

Exhibition view: Cristóbal Cea, Hawker Hunter (v.11), 2015, as part of Si tú vivieras aquí at MAC Chile, 2019. Photo: Sebastián Mejía. Image courtesy of MAC Chile

Almost arriving to the exit of the museum, like a hiccup, cornered against a pillar the video of Cristóbal Cea (Santiago, 1981), Hawker Hunter (v.1.1) (2015), is installed on the ground; a 3D animation, reproduced in a loop, of the flight of the British plane with which the military bombed the Palacio de la Moneda on September 11, 1973, and whose control cabin Cea covers with what looks like a huge fabric, boycotting its trajectory, its destructive objective, trying to prevent the irreversible.

The pre-spring afternoon ends. In Santiago it is already night. People wrap themselves in coats, surround their necks with scarves. They abandon the silence and whisper to comment on the experience as they descend the steps of the museum. Rosler has condemned indifference. Our indifference or theirs? Her work, at the time, responded to a contextual, political need, and her propaganda, non-artistic desire was criticized. Now that we know, can we remain the same? Outside some stop to taste the smell of caramel from a cart of cabritas [3]. Knowledge is not enough if one does not have power over that information. Do we have power over that information? Maybe they are right. We can be replaced. 

Kati Lincopil (Independencia, 1989) Graduated from Art Theory and History from the Universidad de Chile. Bookseller. Editor and co-founder at revistadesastre.cl

[1] Total Control
bright eviction image
scrutiny regimes
I don’t say map, I don’t say territory
escape fantasies

[2] They have black skin,
like an Atacameño
hard hair,
thick lips
overbearing
wide chin,
narrow forehead
as if they didn’t have a brain.

[3] Popcorn.

Martha Rosler, Si tú vivieras aquí, vista de instalación en MAC Chile, 2019. Foto: Sebastián Mejía. Imagen cortesía de MAC Chile

Recuerden, ustedes pueden ser reemplazados 

Una de las sedes del Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Santiago de Chile está ubicada en el Parque Forestal, en la ribera sur del río Mapocho, en el centro mismo de la ciudad. Familias de distinta conformación, tamaño y nacionalidad aprovechan para pasear. Algunas renuncian a la tarde soleada para explorar el frío interior del MAC, el siamés impopular del Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, con el cual comparte edificio.

En la primera planta se encuentra Si tú vivieras aquí, la primera retrospectiva de la artista estadounidense Martha Rosler (Brooklyn, 1943) en Latinoamérica, curada por Mariagrazia Muscatello y Montserrat Rojas Corradi, en el marco de la segunda edición de BIENALSUR —la Bienal Internacional de Arte Contemporáneo de América del Sur. Así lo anuncian las grandes letras blancas inscritas al exterior de la sala 1, junto a una lista de las y los artistas nacionales invitadas e invitados a dialogar: Claudia del Fierro, Cristóbal Cea, Bárbara Oettinger, Bernardo Oyarzún, Voluspa Jarpa y Máximo Corvalán-Pincheira.

“¿Quién es Martha Rosler?”, se preguntan al oído algunos de los que se animaron a entrar al museo. Al cruzar el umbral se encuentran con In the place of the public: Airport, que ocupa los dos primeros muros que colindan en ángulo recto. Ocho fotografías de la serie, que muestran los lúgubres interiores de aeropuertos de EE.UU. y Alemania, fronteras higiénicas y estandarizadas, están montadas en línea horizontal sobre ambos muros blancos, rodeadas de frases de distintos tamaños, en letras negras, como si flotaran:  

control total

imagen brillante de desalojo

regímenes del escrutinio

No digo mapa, no digo territorio

fantasías de escape

Más a la izquierda una pantalla plana reproduce un slide de fotos del proyecto aún en curso Air Fare, una serie de capturas de comidas ofrecidas en vuelos de primera clase, deformes miniaturas, versiones patéticas e industrializadas, de tablas de queso y uvas, pato a la naranja, crême brûlée. Porciones casi inexistentes de caviar acompañadas de copitas de champaña, que la baja calidad de las tomas vuelven aún más deprimentes y ridículas. 

Martha Rosler, Si tú vivieras aquí, vista de instalación en MAC Chile, 2019. Foto: Sebastián Mejía. Imagen cortesía de MAC Chile

Dos mujeres muy jóvenes, una de cabello corto y rosado y otra de melena azul, se detienen frente al televisor por unos momentos, cuchichean brevemente, y se dirigen con impaciencia a la banca de madera dispuesta frente a un antiguo televisor que reproduce el video de 1983, A simple case for torture, or how to sleep at night. Los dos auriculares conectados son ocupados por una mujer y su pequeño hijo. El niño tiene apenas tres años, la madre intenta empecinadamente ponerle los audífonos y, con acento venezolano, le pide que se quede tranquilo. Luego de que logra acomodarlo, miran por unos momentos las manos de Rosler moviendo y superponiendo recortes de prensa escrita sobre la intervención de EE.UU. en Latinoamérica, la que propició los golpes de Estado, denunciando su apoyo implícito a la tortura, las violaciones a los derechos humanos. En una hora de grabación, Rosler muestra una documentación bibliográfica exhaustiva de las consecuencias políticas y económicas en dichos países, la manipulación de la información y la soberbia estadounidenses. Paralelamente, la voz de un hombre expone en inglés sobre filosofía y política. El video no cuenta con subtítulos. 

En la sala se escucha un golpe estrepitoso que hace que varias personas se distraigan de la lectura de las reproducciones ampliadas de Tijuana maid (texto original de 1978 y readaptado este año), una de las Novelas postales de Service: A trilogy on colonization, en la que una mujer mexicana que emigra de Tijuana a San Diego relata, en primera persona, la experiencia de cruzar la frontera ilegalmente, para luego ejercer como criada, siendo víctima de abusos y discriminación, mientras, paralelamente, es objeto de exotización y motivo de presunción por parte de sus empleadores. “Will you cook a Mexican dinner for us sometimes? / ¿Nos cocina una comida mexicana para nosotros alguna vez?”, dice en una de las postales que recoge fragmentos de recetas y frases comunes del Home maid Spanish cookbook, el bestseller bilingüe que intenta adiestrar al servicio doméstico hispanohablante en las costumbres de la American family. “A los ricos le gusta comer la comida de los pobres”, afirma la protagonista del relato. El testimonio problematiza cómo la extrema xenofobia colinda con la devoración cultural y física de los inmigrantes/invasores, recluidos y esclavizados en la intimidad de la familia burguesa. 

El niño se encuentra en el suelo, los audífonos lejos, y la madre se apresura en levantarlo. Rosler sigue moviendo sus recortes en la pantalla, mostrando libros. La madre y el niño se alejan del intervencionismo, de la tortura, de la política y la filosofía.

La característica melodía de Star Wars que musicaliza el paródico video Chile on the road to NAFTA (1997), interpretada por la Banda Instrumental de la Escuela de Suboficiales de Carabineros, llena la sala. La luz de la proyección es débil y no logra sobreponerse a la iluminación del lugar. Las imágenes del Chile rural de los noventa y la gigantografía de un enorme brazo que empuña una lata de Coca-Cola, emplazado en medio de un eriazo, aluden a cómo Chile pasó de un gobierno socialista a volverse el “laboratorio neoliberal” de América Latina. Star Wars, el puño, carretas tiradas por mulas, las épicas trompetas, Coca-Cola. El montaje no puede sino provocar una risa melancólica. 

Martha Rosler, Si tú vivieras aquí, vista de instalación en MAC Chile, 2019. Foto: Sebastián Mejía. Imagen cortesía de MAC Chile

Dos señoras se sorprenden al ver que la obra trata sobre Chile. Se sorprenden de verse producidas y observadas por la productora y observadora proveniente de EE.UU., el mirador mundial. 

Claudia del Fierro (Santiago, 1974) ocupa la esquina sur oriente del museo, dando la espalda a la Cordillera de los Andes. Su obra Políticamente correcto (2001-2019) es una video performance reproducida en dos proyecciones simultáneas. En una, vemos a Del Fierro caminar por una vereda en dirección a la proyección vecina y luego regresar. En el segundo vemos cómo, vestida como una más de las costureras de una fábrica de ropa, logra entrar y salir del lugar junto al resto de las obreras, sin que nadie note que no trabaja ahí. Del Fierro se “disfraza” de obrera textil para entrometerse en su mundo. En el suelo, levemente iluminados, están apilados los uniformes, los disfraces. Afuera, una pantalla plana reproduce el montaje de imágenes de inmigrantes cruzando la frontera de países del primer mundo, intercaladas con violentos flashes rojos, que conforman la pieza Who said we did not know (2018) de Bárbara Oettinger (Santiago, 1981), la única artista que no se refiere a Chile. Junto a ella, las tres fotografías biométricas de un rostro “mestizo, junto a una reproducción de un retrato hablado de rasgos similares, superan los dos metros de alto y son parte de la icónica obra Bajo sospecha de Bernardo Oyarzún (Los muermos, 1963). El rostro retratado en las gigantografías es el del artista, quien en 1998 fue detenido por Carabineros y acusado injustamente de haber cometido un asalto. Oyarzún reflexiona sobre la criminalización de sus rasgos mapuche, ofreciendo su rostro al escrutinio, al juicio. La presencia de esta obra recuerda que en Chile perdura el racismo y el clasismo consecuencia de la Colonia. Un eco en la cultura popular que apunta a ello es el programa de humor crítico Plan Z, que en los años noventa, parodiaba esta situación con un sitcom llamado Mapuches millonarios. Una contradicción absoluta en Chile. “A veces creo que debería teñirme el pelo negro y cambiarme el apellido”, se lamenta en una escena la criada blanca y colorina de la familia mapuche representada en Plan Z.

Oyarzún monta además 164 retratos fotográficos de personas con alguna filiación sanguínea consigo mismo titulados La parentela o por la causa. La tipificación racista del rasgo mapuche emerge en el puente de una nariz, la forma de un cuello, la carnosidad de los labios, el color de la piel, algo que por muchas generaciones fue y sigue siendo motivo de vergüenza. Tener cara de pobre, de criminal. Tener “cara de nana”, como le gritaron en una versión de Lollapalloza a la músico chilena Anita Tijoux. 

En el muro un texto reza:

Tiene la piel negra,
como un atacameño
el pelo duro,
los labios gruesos
prepotentes
mentón amplio,
frente estrecha,
como sin cerebro.

Son las cicatrices de un pecado original. Los retratos son un espejo, nos reflejan. Su “parentela” es también la nuestra.

Martha Rosler, Si tú vivieras aquí, vista de instalación en MAC Chile, 2019. Foto: Sebastián Mejía. Imagen cortesía de MAC Chile

La cantidad de información escrita que contiene la siguiente sala podría conformar un enorme libro. Informe Rettig (2017), de Máximo Corvalán-Pincheira (Santiago, 1977), instala en el muro tres tomos del Informe de la Comisión de Verdad y Reconciliación intervenidos con fuego hasta casi su desaparición. La obra recupera los relatos de presos políticos en la dictadura chilena. Junto a ella, Secuenciación del azul marino (2017) y White page sequencing presentan hojas de la guía telefónica de Santiago y Nueva York, respectivamente. La primera, intervenida con acuarela azul, es una alegoría a las personas asesinadas por la dictadura al ser lanzadas al Océano Pacífico. Son las únicas piezas de la muestra que intentan explicarse y contextualizarse por medio de un texto inscrito sobre el muro, que algunos se detienen a leer, mirando las piezas de reojo. Junto a ellas, parte del proyecto de Voluspa Jarpa (Rancagua, 1971), La biblioteca de la no historia, trabaja en torno a la desclasificación por parte del Servicio Secreto de EE.UU. de más de 200 mil documentos que refieren a Chile. Una desclasificación clausurada: 70% de la información fue tachada, borrada, perpetuando el trauma. 

Los espectadores rodean las obras, leen parcialmente. Un hombre mayor con lentes bifocales pega la nariz en los documentos, frunciendo el ceño. Ladea la cabeza. La información textual es inabarcable, como inabarcable es la historia del horror. Borrar, tachar, hundir los relatos y los nombres de los sujetos, en estas obras, alude a la desaparición y tortura de sus cuerpos, pero por otro lado, su deshumanización. Para la dictadura los sujetos deben ser otros, olvidar, o de lo contrario, desaparecer. El asesinato de los opositores es un intento desesperado por borrar su existencia, donde los ciudadanos y su historia son solo datos, versiones reemplazables. Pero recuperar los “datos” no es una enunciación vacía, es inscribir en el papel, y así, en la memoria, la presencia en el mundo de quienes se intentó extinguir. Es recordar y recuperar el lugar de lo único que nos queda de ellos.

Separada de las obras chilenas, la última sala vuelve al trabajo de Rosler. A medida que cae la tarde, la humedad del interior cala los huesos. Solo algunas personas logran llegar a este último momento. En esta sala predominan las obras que han sido clasificadas como feministas, pero desde la perspectiva cerrada del feminismo blanco, que ha homogeneizado la identidad de las mujeres cisgénero, dejando en segundo plano su inscripción social, étnica, territorial y de clase. Un lugar de enunciación de discursos y producción de imágenes que va más allá de la tematización de las obras o la instalación de los tópicos asociados a “lo femenino” en la misma, donde, como en estas obras, hay una visibilización crítica a estereotipos sexistas superficiales, sin una mayor reflexión al respecto.

Las voces de la madre e hijo del video Domination and the everyday (1978) comparten espacio con los fotomontajes de la popular serie House beautiful: Bringing the war home (1967-1972), volviendo al tema de la invasión de los medios de comunicación en los espacios de intimidad, denunciando la indiferencia. Del poder sobre la información. Sobre un plinto un loop del paródico Semiotic of the kitchen (1975) es el único de los videos subtitulados al español, una pequeña fisura en la tiranía del inglés sobre las obras y las cédulas que atraviesa la muestra. En el otro extremo, Martha Rosler reads Vogue (1982), donde a través de los audífonos podemos oír la voz de la artista preguntando y respondiendo, mientras hojea la revista: “What is Vogue, what is fashion. It is glamour, it is excitement, drama, wishing…”. En otro muro comparten espacio las fotografías del cantautor Víctor Jara (San Ignacio, 1932) Manifestación en la vía pública (Vietnam Solidarity Campaign) de 1968 con el texto en español La restauración de la alta cultura en Chile (1977) de Rosler. El texto entrega una línea brutal: “La junta aparece en Televisión o por lo menos a los que tenían acceso a la televisión, luego del golpe —así lo afirma el New York Times— para recordarle a la gente de Chile: ‘Recuerden, ustedes pueden ser reemplazados’”. La obra convive espacialmente con fotografías de transeúntes y trabajadores de la serie Cuba (1981) y Chile (1995). Nosotros, los reemplazables.

Vista de instalación: Cristóbal Cea, Hawker Hunter (v.11), 2015, como parte de Si tú vivieras aquí en MAC Chile, 2019. Foto: Sebastián Mejía. Imagen cortesía de MAC Chile

Casi llegando a la salida del museo, como un tropiezo, arrinconado contra un pilar, se encuentra instalado en el suelo el video de Cristóbal Cea (Santiago, 1981), Hawker Hunter (v.1.1) (2015), una animación en 3D, reproducida en loop, del vuelo del avión británico con el que los militares bombardearon el Palacio de la Moneda el 11 de septiembre de 1973, y cuya cabina de control Cea recubre con lo que parece una enorme tela, boicoteando su trayectoria, su objetivo destructor, intentando impedir lo irreversible.

La tarde pre-primaveral acaba. En Santiago ya es de noche. La gente se enfunda en abrigos, rodea sus cuellos con bufandas. Abandona el silencio y los susurros para comentar lo experimentado mientras bajan la escalinata del museo. Rosler ha denunciado la indiferencia. ¿Nuestra indiferencia o la de ellos? Su obra respondió en su momento a una necesidad contextual, política, y se criticó su afán propagandístico, no-artístico. Ahora que sabemos, ¿podemos seguir igual? Afuera algunos se tientan con el olor a caramelo de un carrito de cabritas. [1] Saber no es suficiente si no se tiene poder sobre esa información. ¿Tenemos poder sobre esa información? Quizás tienen razón. Nosotros podemos ser reemplazados.

Kati Lincopil (Independencia, 1989) Estudió Teoría e Historia del Arte en la Universidad de Chile. Librera. Editora y co-fundadora en revistadesastre.cl

[1] Popcorn.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

MARGINALIA #26

Jennie C. Jones: Compilation

MARGINALIA #36

Taming the Dancing Table: Post-humanist ethics in the age of hyper-capitalist spectacle. A conversation with Noah Simblist, Carol Zou, Andy Campbell and Chelsea Weathers.