Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

RELATIONS: Diaspora and Painting

Curated by Cheryl Sim

PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art Montréal, Québec, Canada July 8, 2020 – November 29, 2020

Installation view, RELATIONS: Diaspora and Painting, 2020, PHI Foundation. From left to right: Rajni Perera, I take a journey, you take a journey, we take a journey together (Mask 4), 2020. Courtesy of the artist; Ancestor 2, 2019; Ancestor 1, 2019. Courtesy of Patel Brown Gallery, Toronto © PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art, photo: Richard-Max Tremblay

Installation view, RELATIONS: Diaspora and Painting, 2020, PHI Foundation. From left to right: Barkley L. Hendricks, Anthem, 2015; Barkley L. Hendricks, JohnWayne, 2015. Courtesy of the Estate of Barkley L. Hendricks and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Larry Achiampong, Holy Cloud (Mighty Jesus), 2014. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London © PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art, photo: Richard-Max Tremblay

Installation view, RELATIONS: Diaspora and Painting, 2020, PHI Foundation. From left to right: Hurvin Anderson, Welcome: Carib, 2005. Collection of Thomas Dane; Peter’s Sitters II, 2009. Courtesy of Zabludowicz Art Trust © PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art, photo: Richard-Max Tremblay

RELATIONS: Diaspora and Painting brings together over 50 artworks that elicit a convergence of visual melodies and countermelodies, which culminate in a contrapuntal experience. This group show explores the complex and multiple meanings of diaspora, its condition, and its experiences as expressed through painting. “The questions and concepts of diaspora are of deep, personal interest to me as a person of colour born in Canada of mixed Asian heritage,” says curator and managing director Cheryl Sim. The wide spectrum of productive interpretations and relations that are generated by experiences of diaspora remain unfixed, providing endless engagement with the notions of kinship and identity in a world of advanced globalization and migration.

This show presents a selection of work by artists who address questions of diaspora from diverse perspectives, methodologies and aesthetic languages. The medium of painting, with its deep and complex history, becomes a particularly provocative lens through which to explore the complications and diversities that are analogous to the richness of diasporic experiences. This collective body of work also aims for an intergenerational dialogue and presents artists whose work has pushed the boundaries of what painting is and can be. Given the open-ended and discursive nature of the subject, the show is by no means an attempt to be exhaustive but, rather, endeavours to open up ideas and encourage dialogue.

Artists

Larry Achiampong, Hurvin Anderson, Kamrooz Aram, Moridja Kitenge Banza, Firelei Báez, Frank Bowling, Cy Gavin, Barkley L. Hendricks, Lubaina Himid, Bharti Kher, Rick Leong, Manuel Mathieu, Julie Mehretu, Jordan Nassar, Yoko Ono, Maia Cruz Palileo, Rajni Perera, Ed Pien, Jessica Sabogal, Marigold Santos, Yinka Shonibare CBE, Shanna Strauss, Curtis Talwst Santiago, Mickalene Thomas, Salman Toor, Hajra Waheed, Jinny Yu.

PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art

Established in 2007 by Phoebe Greenberg, the PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art, formerly known as DHC/ART, is a non-profit organization dedicated to the presentation of contemporary art. Housed in two heritage buildings located in the heart of Old Montréal, its programming has met with critical acclaim both at home and around the world. Each year, the PHI Foundation presents two to three major exhibitions, a series of public events, special collaborative projects and a forward-thinking education program. International in scope yet responsive to the Montréal context, the Foundation’s programming is offered free of charge to reinforce its commitment to accessibility, while fostering a discussion on how contemporary art is invested with the topics and ideas that reflect and touch our everyday lives.

https://fondation-phi.org/

Installation view, RELATIONS: Diaspora and Painting, 2020, PHI Foundation. From left to right: Rajni Perera, I take a journey, you take a journey, we take a journey together (Mask 4), 2020. Courtesy of the artist; Ancestor 2, 2019; Ancestor 1, 2019. Courtesy of Patel Brown Gallery, Toronto © PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art, photo: Richard-Max Tremblay

Installation view, RELATIONS: Diaspora and Painting, 2020, PHI Foundation. From left to right: Barkley L. Hendricks, Anthem, 2015; Barkley L. Hendricks, JohnWayne, 2015. Courtesy of the Estate of Barkley L. Hendricks and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Larry Achiampong, Holy Cloud (Mighty Jesus), 2014. Courtesy of the artist and Copperfield, London © PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art, photo: Richard-Max Tremblay

Installation view, RELATIONS: Diaspora and Painting, 2020, PHI Foundation. From left to right: Hurvin Anderson, Welcome: Carib, 2005. Collection of Thomas Dane; Peter’s Sitters II, 2009. Courtesy of Zabludowicz Art Trust © PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art, photo: Richard-Max Tremblay

RELATIONS: Diaspora and Painting brings together over 50 artworks that elicit a convergence of visual melodies and countermelodies, which culminate in a contrapuntal experience. This group show explores the complex and multiple meanings of diaspora, its condition, and its experiences as expressed through painting. “The questions and concepts of diaspora are of deep, personal interest to me as a person of colour born in Canada of mixed Asian heritage,” says curator and managing director Cheryl Sim. The wide spectrum of productive interpretations and relations that are generated by experiences of diaspora remain unfixed, providing endless engagement with the notions of kinship and identity in a world of advanced globalization and migration.

This show presents a selection of work by artists who address questions of diaspora from diverse perspectives, methodologies and aesthetic languages. The medium of painting, with its deep and complex history, becomes a particularly provocative lens through which to explore the complications and diversities that are analogous to the richness of diasporic experiences. This collective body of work also aims for an intergenerational dialogue and presents artists whose work has pushed the boundaries of what painting is and can be. Given the open-ended and discursive nature of the subject, the show is by no means an attempt to be exhaustive but, rather, endeavours to open up ideas and encourage dialogue.

Artists

Larry Achiampong, Hurvin Anderson, Kamrooz Aram, Moridja Kitenge Banza, Firelei Báez, Frank Bowling, Cy Gavin, Barkley L. Hendricks, Lubaina Himid, Bharti Kher, Rick Leong, Manuel Mathieu, Julie Mehretu, Jordan Nassar, Yoko Ono, Maia Cruz Palileo, Rajni Perera, Ed Pien, Jessica Sabogal, Marigold Santos, Yinka Shonibare CBE, Shanna Strauss, Curtis Talwst Santiago, Mickalene Thomas, Salman Toor, Hajra Waheed, Jinny Yu.

PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art

Established in 2007 by Phoebe Greenberg, the PHI Foundation for Contemporary Art, formerly known as DHC/ART, is a non-profit organization dedicated to the presentation of contemporary art. Housed in two heritage buildings located in the heart of Old Montréal, its programming has met with critical acclaim both at home and around the world. Each year, the PHI Foundation presents two to three major exhibitions, a series of public events, special collaborative projects and a forward-thinking education program. International in scope yet responsive to the Montréal context, the Foundation’s programming is offered free of charge to reinforce its commitment to accessibility, while fostering a discussion on how contemporary art is invested with the topics and ideas that reflect and touch our everyday lives.

https://fondation-phi.org/

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

SITU #4 | Beto Shwafaty

Conexiones naturales. Arte ⚭ vida

Consonancia

Wrong Happy Hour