Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Playground

Curated by Verónica Flom and Camilo Godoy

Dot Fiftyone Gallery Miami, Florida, USA July 31, 2019 – September 14, 2019

Playground (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of Dot Fiftyone Gallery

Playground (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of Dot Fiftyone Gallery

Playground (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of Dot Fiftyone Gallery

The exhibition focuses on childhood as a site for the exploration of fragile, ludic, violent and poetic universes. Together, the artists in this exhibition work with ideas from their childhood as the material to address personal and political moments. From playing as a newscaster to documenting portraits of children who have been the target of gun violence; as well as to confronting one’s mother about gender or creating imaginary landscapes based on sci-fi video games, Playground interrogates the construction of identity by artists engaged with a deep observation on the formative years of their life.

Playground starts with a sculpture by Ariel Mora that focuses on the artist’s fascination with fluorescent colors and illustrations found in children’s books. This sculpture is followed by a video installation by Camilo Godoy that presents the artist as a young child reading Colombia’s evening news from 2002. Nearby the drawings of children by VantaBlack focus on victims of gun violence in Miami Dade County. Political memory is a subject in the drawings by Daniel Greenfield-Campoverde of world maps that he made as a child in his notebook. Next to these drawings are two paintings by Leo Castañeda that investigate the universe of video game imagery to explore the intersection of science-fiction, futurism and post-human reality. The wearable sculptures hung on the walls by Melissa Stabile de Mello invite the audience to a playful experience that reminds us of childhood toys. In the viewing room, the short film by Arisleyda Dilone engages in a tender conversation between the artist and her mother about womanhood, femininity and Dilone’s intersex body. The watercolor by Chioma Ebinama references the social construction of twins in Nigeria before this territory was spiritually colonized and Christianized. Across from this watercolor are two photographic pieces by Jeanie Choi that assemble photographs from her family album to reflect on her migration and assimilation process.

Artists

Leo Castañeda, Arisleyda Dilone, Chioma Ebinama, Daniel Greenfield-Campoverde, Camilo Godoy, Ariel Mora, Melissa Stabile, Jeanie Choi and VantaBlack.

https://dotfiftyone.com

Playground (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of Dot Fiftyone Gallery

Playground (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of Dot Fiftyone Gallery

Playground (2019). Installation view. Image courtesy of Dot Fiftyone Gallery

The exhibition focuses on childhood as a site for the exploration of fragile, ludic, violent and poetic universes. Together, the artists in this exhibition work with ideas from their childhood as the material to address personal and political moments. From playing as a newscaster to documenting portraits of children who have been the target of gun violence; as well as to confronting one’s mother about gender or creating imaginary landscapes based on sci-fi video games, Playground interrogates the construction of identity by artists engaged with a deep observation on the formative years of their life.

Playground starts with a sculpture by Ariel Mora that focuses on the artist’s fascination with fluorescent colors and illustrations found in children’s books. This sculpture is followed by a video installation by Camilo Godoy that presents the artist as a young child reading Colombia’s evening news from 2002. Nearby the drawings of children by VantaBlack focus on victims of gun violence in Miami Dade County. Political memory is a subject in the drawings by Daniel Greenfield-Campoverde of world maps that he made as a child in his notebook. Next to these drawings are two paintings by Leo Castañeda that investigate the universe of video game imagery to explore the intersection of science-fiction, futurism and post-human reality. The wearable sculptures hung on the walls by Melissa Stabile de Mello invite the audience to a playful experience that reminds us of childhood toys. In the viewing room, the short film by Arisleyda Dilone engages in a tender conversation between the artist and her mother about womanhood, femininity and Dilone’s intersex body. The watercolor by Chioma Ebinama references the social construction of twins in Nigeria before this territory was spiritually colonized and Christianized. Across from this watercolor are two photographic pieces by Jeanie Choi that assemble photographs from her family album to reflect on her migration and assimilation process.

Artists

Leo Castañeda, Arisleyda Dilone, Chioma Ebinama, Daniel Greenfield-Campoverde, Camilo Godoy, Ariel Mora, Melissa Stabile, Jeanie Choi and VantaBlack.

https://dotfiftyone.com

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