Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

The Panic Man: Shock and Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Panic Theory

By Arden Decker

Shock and Alejandro Jodorowsky are synonymous. Those familiar with his films since the 1966 production Fando y Lis have come to expect this element in his works. But when and where did this aesthetic of shock originate? His Panic Theory -developed in the early 1960s- and its first visual expressions, the "panic ephemerals,” hold the keys.

El shock y Alejandro Jodorowsky son sinónimos. Aquellos familiarizados con sus películas se han acostumbrado desde Fando y Lis (1966) a esperar este elemento en sus producciones. Pero, ¿cuándo y dónde se originó esta estética del shock? La clave se encuentra en su Teoría Pánica, desarrollada al comienzo de los sesentas, y en sus primeras expresiones visuales, el "pánico efímero'.

SC-11 (AJ and shaving cream)

Alejandro Jodorowsky and shaving cream. Ephemeral at the Academy of San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

The artist, director and writer Alejandro Jodorowsky is best known for his shocking and controversial film career that spans nearly six decades. During the 1960s, he began to develop a distinctive aesthetic vocabulary, consistently employing disturbing and jolting imagery that was frequently the target of censorship.  His cult-favorite films such as the acid-Western El Topo (1970) or his epically delirious The Holy Mountain (1973), feature explicit depictions of nudity, sexuality, physical violence (particularly against women), animal sacrifice, and anti-religious and anti-authoritarian sentiment, mixed with a bit of alchemy and magic. An aesthetic of shock permeates his body of work and he has applied this concept not only to his films, but also his theatrical productions, writing, performative interventions, television shows, and even in comics, as recent exhibitions such as the retrospective at CAPC Musée d’art contemporain in Bordeaux, curated by María Inés Rodríguez, have helped to elaborate and contextualize. But how and why did Jodorowsky arrive at this aesthetic of shock and how might we problematize his reliance on this strategy? In order to assess this, an investigation into his Panic theory and his “panic ephemerals” is necessary.

Arriving in Mexico after a stint in Paris, Jodorowsky stayed in regular contact with fellow artists in Europe including Fernando Arrabal and Roland Topor. All three artist-writers worked in a Surrealist mode but grew frustrated with the movement, comprised, as has Jodorowsky described, by “men in ties that talked about politics and not art, they were bureaucrats.”(1) In his estimation, the Surrealists saw the movement as a culture, but one that had grown increasingly rigid and regulated under the guidance of figures like André Breton. In response to these conflicts the artist began to develop a theory of Panic.

In Mexico, Jodorowsky began to develop his world of panic, engaging what little experimental theater scene the country had to offer. He staged productions of Samuel Beckett (Theater of the Absurd) and Antonin Artaud (Theater of Cruelty), both of whom informed his drive toward panic and particularly the latter for his introduction of the irrationality and instability into the equation. These early productions, pointed towards a desire to violate the assumed roles and spaces of traditional theater productions. Additionally, they were demonstrative of his desire to eliminate ties to the bourgeoisie and attempt “to place the audience on the verge of crisis.”(2)Panic theory proposed that through the creation of an environment of forced panic and chaos, the audience might reach a state of euphoria and transform, thereby turning into the “panic man” who is free from the constraints of social, historical, and political repression and the chains of “individual thought”.(3)

SC-1 (Mickey Salas-drums by Urias)

Mickey Salas-drums by Urias. Ephemeral at the Academy of San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

In addition to theatrical concerns, Panic theory also developed as a possible escape or solution to the crisis over the “real” (particularly the debate over figuration and abstraction) that permeated international artistic debates of the time.(4) Given Jodorowsky’s theatrical roots, it is unsurprising that he turned to ephemeral performance as a means of critiquing and challenging artistic categories and the interdependency of art and institution at the time.

The first physical manifestations of what became “Panic theory” were largely improvised, one-time events and interventions called efímeros pánicos or Panic ephemerals. They involved the participation of all manner of artists, musicians, poets, actors, dancers, prostitutes and performers engaging in a chaotic and delirious production of simultaneously occurring collective and individual actions. Loose schematic scripts were developed by Jodorowsky or by the participants themselves encouraging a truly interdisciplinary model to art making.(5) They performed with numerous props and objects, some of them created for the event (such as  musical instruments) and others that could be used for improvisation, including quotidian elements like eggs, shaving cream, milk, baby carriages, axes, and tortillas. Through the shock of the chance encounter with these spontaneous action, Jodorowsky hoped a type of therapy would be performed at the efímero. The interaction with objects and materials was meant to be a “real action” and not an act of representation.(6) Having been removed from the role of “spectator” and liberated from “individual thought”, promoting a form of cathartic release from the crisis of contemporary life.(7) By participating in the Panic party, the common man is transformed into a “Panic man” through a strategy that is akin to electroshock therapy.

According to his text in Teatro pánico (first published in 1965), the three ingredients of “panic” are: euphoria, humor, and terror.(8) If we turn to the little extent documentary evidence of the ephemerals, it is clear that these elements were consistently employed. In a 1963 ephemeral at the Academy of San Carlos (the only well documented early example), Mannequins were violated with axes, women were given haircuts, a piano was destroyed and set on fire and the flames then used to roast several chickens.(9)

SC-13 (mannequin destruction-MF background)

Mannequin destruction. Ephemeral at the Academy of San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

The 1965 ephemeral in Paris (part of a panic spectacle organized with Arrabal and Topor), features such salacious activities as Jodorowksy himself,- initially dressed as Parisian police officer- sacrificing live chickens, their spilled blood then smeared on the naked and frantically gyrating bodies of female dancers. He even pummeled their bodies with the headless carcasses against a background of beat pounding drums. Towards the end of the disturbing scenario, a crazed Jodorowsky, was taken by a hooded figure resembling death. This figure began to smother him with an object resembling  a large plastic vagina. Eventually he escaped, using an axe to hack his way through the vagina. After emerging on the other side, he was received and embraced by this figure of death, completing his transformation into the “panic man”.

SC-26 (AJ piano and chicken)

Alejandro Jodorowsky, piano and chicken. Ephemeral at the Academy of San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

An abandonment of social hierarchies was also a desire effect of panic, and the delirious combining of disparate elements and actions were meant to call the authority of these constructions into question. But as was insightfully suggested in a recent review of Jodorowsky’s retrospective in Bordeaux, there is a curious and shocking reliance on the violation of the female figure throughout the ephemerals.!10) While this might be reflective of the state of feminism in Mexico during the 1960s as well as a misogynistic stance on the part of the artist, the shocking treatment of women (and animals and, at times, the disenfranchised) in the ephemerals verges on the border of “shock for shock’s sake.”

SC-23 (Urias cutting corset - bollilos)

Urias cutting corset – bollilos. Ephemeral at the Academy of San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

This problematizes panic theory’s proposal to offer respite from societal ills when viewed from a 21st century perspective, yet the fact that the ephemerals continue to have a shocking effect raises further questions over the effectiveness of the panic ephemerals. Can and how might artists present opportunities for a collective healing in today’s world? How do we redefine an aesthetic of shock in a landscape inundated with repeating images of chaos and terror? That Jodorowksy’s evocation of panic during the 1960s and 70s continues to provoke both outrage and veneration in audiences, suggests that there might be potential for a collective shock therapy to generate new social and political models even today.

Notes:

(1) “eran hombres de corbata que hablaban de política y no de arte, eran burócratas…” Ignacio Maldonado Llobet and Lourdes Sánchez Puig, “La Osadía Jodorowsky, los primeros happenings latinoamericanos,” (masters thesis, Universidad Iberoamericana, 1994), p. 51.
(2) Cuauhtémoc Medina, “Recovering Panic,” in Olivier Debroise, ed., La era de la discrepancia: Arte y cultura visual en México / The Age of Discrepancies: Art and Visual Culture in Mexico; 1968–1997 (Mexico City: UNAM / Turner, 2006), 98.
(3) Alejandro Jodorowsky, “Hacía el ‘efimero’ pánico o ¡sacar el teatro del teatro!”, in Teatro pánico (México: Era, 1965), p. 12-13.
(4) Rita Eder, “Two Aspects of the Total Work of Art: Experimentation and Performativity,” in Desafío a la estabilidad: procesos artísticos 1952-1967. (Mexico City: MUAC/UNAM, 2014), p. 65-81.
(5) Jodorowsky, “Hacía el ‘efimero’ pánico o ¡sacar el teatro del teatro!”, p. 12.  The recent exhibition, Desafío a la estabilidad: procesos artísticos 1952-1967 (MUAC, UNAM, 2014) firmly positioned Jodorowsky as a central figure in the development of non-traditional and interdisciplinary art practices and his relationship to the artists of the Ruptura generation in particular.
(6) Ibid., 15.
(7) Ibid., 13.
(8) Ibid., 12.
(9) “Documento pánico,” in Teatro pánico.
(10) Daniel Spicer, “Alejandro Jodorowsky: never belonging,” Wire (August 2015). Accessed 8/31/2015. http://www.thewire.co.uk/in-writing/columns/alejandro-jodorowsky-38280#.VeCQHbiOAqI.facebook.


Arden Decker
is an art historian based in Mexico City. Her academic research focuses on the development of ephemeral art and strategies of institutional intervention in 1960s and 1970s Mexico.

SC-11 (AJ and shaving cream)

Alejandro Jodorowsky y crema de afeitar. Efímero en la Escuela de San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

El Hombre Pánico: el “shock” y la Teoría Pánica de Alejandro Jodorowsky

El artista, director y escritor Alejandro Jodorowsky es conocido sobre todo por su impactante y controversial producción cinematográfica que abarca casi seis décadas. En los sesentas empezó a desarrollar un vocabulario estético dintintivo en el que empleaba de manera consistente imágenes perturbadoras y subversivas que eran frecuente blanco de censura. Sus películas de culto preferidas como el Western ácido El Topo (1970) o la épicamente delirante La Montaña Sagrada (1973) contienen representaciones explícitas de desnudez, sexualidad, violencia física (particularmente hacia las mujeres), sacrificios animales y sentimientos anti-religiosos y anti-autoritarios, todo mezclado con un poco de alquimia y magia. Una estética del “shock” permea su cuerpo de trabajo, y él ha aplicado este concepto no solamente en sus películas, sino también en sus producciones teatrales, intervenciones performáticas, programas de televisión e incluso en sus comics, lo que exhibiciones recientes como la retrospectiva de su trabajo curada por María Inés Rodríguez en el CAPC Musée d’art contemporain de Burdeos en Francia han contribuido a elabor y contextualizar. Pero ¿cómo y por qué llegó Jodorowsky a esta estética del shock? ¿Cómo podemos problematizar su uso de esta estrategia? Para considerar estos temas, es necesaria una investigación de su Teoría Pánica y sus efímeros pánicos.

Al llegar a México tras una breve estancia en Paris, Jodorowsky se mantuvo en contacto regular con colegas artistas de Europa, encluyendo a Fernando Arrabal y Roland Topor. Los tres artistas-escritores trabajaban en un estilo surrealista pero se fueron frustrando progresivamente con el movimiento, que estaba lleno de -como lo describe Jodorowsky- “hombres con corbatas que hablaban de política y no de arte, eran burócratas.”(1) Según él, los surrealistas veían el movimiento como una cultura, pero una que se había vuelto cada vez más rígida bajo la dirección de figuras como André Breton. En respuesta a estos conflictos, el artista empezó a desarrollar una Teoría Pánica.

Fue así como en México, Jodorowsky comenzó a elaborar un mundo de pánico, entrando en contacto con la escasa escena experimental teatral que ofrecía el país. Montó producciones de Samuel Beckett (Teatro del Absurdo) y de Antonin Artaud (Teatro de la Crueldad). Los dos autores informaron su inclinación por el pánico, particularmente Artaud, por su introducción de lo irracional y lo inestable en la ecuación. Estas producciones tempranas señalaban un deseo por violar los roles asumidos y los espacios de las producciones teatrales tradicionales. Adicionalmente, demostraban un impulso por eliminar los lazos con la burguesía y por “situar a la audiencia en el borde de la crisis.”(2) La teoría proponía la creación de un ambiente de pánico impuesto y caos, para que así el público alcanzara un estado de euforia y se transformara en “el hombre pánico”, quien es libre de la represión social, histórica y política, así como de las cadenas del “pensamiento individual.”(3)

SC-1 (Mickey Salas-drums by Urias)

Mickey salas-batería, por Urias. Efímero en la Escuela de San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

Además de estas preocupaciones sobre el teatro, la Teoría Pánica también se desarrolló como un posible escape o solución a la crisis de “lo real” (específicamente el debate sobre la figuración y la abstracción) que permeaba las discusiones artísticas internacionales de la época. (4) Dadas las raíces teatrales de Jodorowsky, no es sorprendente que haya recurrido al performance efímero como una manera de criticar y desafiar categorías artísticas y la interdependencia del arte y la institución en aquel momento.

Las primeras manifestaciones físicas de aquello que devino en la Teoría Pánica fueron ampliamente improvisadas, eventos únicos e intervenciones llamadas efímeros pánicos. Incluían la participación de todo tipo de artistas, músicos, poetas, actores, bailarines, prostitutas y performers que se adentraban en la producción caótica y delirante de acciones colectivas e individuales simultáneas. Guiones esquemáticos muy sueltos eran desarrollados por Jodorowsky o por los participantes mismos, estimulando así un modelo de producción artística verdaderamente interdisciplinario.(5) Ellos performaban con utilería y objetos, algunos creados para los eventos (como instrumentos musicales) y otros que se usaban para improvisar, incluyendo elementos cotidianos como huevos, crema de afeitar, carriolas de bebés, hachas y tortillas. Por medio del shock de los encuentros casuales con estas acciones individuales, Jodorowsky esperaba que una especie de terapia tuviera lugar en los efímeros. La interacción con objetos y materiales era considerada como “acción real” y no como un acto de representación.(6) Habiendo sido suspendido del rol de “espectador” y liberado del “pensamiento individual”, se promovía así una forma de liberación catártica de la crisis de la vida contemporánea.(7) Al participar en la fiesta pánica, el hombre común se transformaba en el “hombre pánico”, a través de una estrategia que es asimilable a una terapia de electroshock.

Según su texto Teatro pánico (publicado por primera vez en 1965), los tres ingredientes del pánico son: la euforia, el humor y el terror.(8) Si observamos la poca evidencia documental de los efímeros, es claro que estos elementos fueron empleados de manera consistente. En un efímero de 1963 en la Academia de San Carlos (el único ejemplo bien documentado), maniquíes eran violados con hachas, a las mujeres se les cortaba el pelo, un piano fue destruido e incendiado y las llamas luego fueron usadas para asar varios pollos.(9)

SC-13 (mannequin destruction-MF background)

Mannequin destruction. Efímero en la Escuela de San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

El efímero de 1965 en Paris (parte del espectáculo pánico organizado con Arrabal y Topor) incluía actividades tan escabrosas como el mismo Jodorowsky – inicialmente vestido como un oficial de policía parisino – sacrificando pollos y luego untando su sangre en los cuerpos desnudos y frenéticamente girantes de unas bailarinas. Incluso azotó sus cuerpos con los cadáveres de los pollos sin cabeza, con un fuerte sonido de tambores al fondo. Hacia el final de la perturbadora escena, un delirante Jodorowsky fue agarrado por una figura encapuchada que se parecía a la muerte. Esta figura empezó a asfixiarlo con un objeto que parecía una gran vagina plástica. Eventualmente él escapó, usando un hacha para abrirse su camino a través de la vagina. Tras emerger del otro lado, fue recibido y abrazado por la figura de la muerte, completando así su transformación en “hombre pánico”.

SC-26 (AJ piano and chicken)

Alejandro Jodorowsky, piano y pollo. Efímero en la Escuela de San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

Otro de los efectos deseados del pánico era el abandono de las jerarquías sociales, así como la combinación delirante de elementos y acciones dispares que estaban destinados a cuestionar la autoridad de dichas construcciones. Pero, como fue sugerido de manera perspicaz en una reseña reciente de la retrospectiva de Jodorowsky en Bordeaux, existe en los efímeros una curiosa e impactante dependencia de la violación de la figura femenina.(10) Mientras esto puede reflejar el estado del feminismo en México en los sesentas, así mismo revela una instancia misógina de parte del artista. El tratamiento chocante de las mujeres (y de los animales, y, en algunas ocasiones, de los marginales) en los efímeros se encuentra al borde del “shock por el shock.”

SC-23 (Urias cutting corset - bollilos)

Urias cutting corset – bollilos. Efímero en la Escuela de San Carlos, 1963. First published in Alejandro Jodorowsky, Teatro pánico, (Mexico City: Era, 1965), 71-72.

Esto problematiza la propuesta de la teoría pánica de ofrecer un respiro de los males de la sociedad al ser observada desde una perspectiva del siglo XXI, y aún así, el hecho de que los efímeros aún tengan un efecto chocante genera preguntas sobre su efectividad. ¿Cómo pueden (si es que pueden) los artistas ofrecer oportunidades para una curación colectiva en el mundo actual? ¿Cómo redefinimos una estética del shock en un paisaje inundado de repetidas imágenes de caos y terror? El hecho de que la evocación del pánico de Jodorowsky en los sesentas y setentas continúe provocando tanto indignación como veneración en las audiencias sugiere que puede existir un potencial para una terapia de shock colectiva, desde la cual generar nuevos modelos sociales y políticos en la actualidad.

 

Notes:

(1) “eran hombres de corbata que hablaban de política y no de arte, eran burócratas…” Ignacio Maldonado Llobet and Lourdes Sánchez Puig, “La Osadía Jodorowsky, los primeros happenings latinoamericanos,” (masters thesis, Universidad Iberoamericana, 1994), p. 51.
(2) Cuauhtémoc Medina, “Recovering Panic,” in Olivier Debroise, ed., La era de la discrepancia: Arte y cultura visual en México / The Age of Discrepancies: Art and Visual Culture in Mexico; 1968–1997 (Mexico City: UNAM / Turner, 2006), 98.
(3) Alejandro Jodorowsky, “Hacía el ‘efimero’ pánico o ¡sacar el teatro del teatro!”, in Teatro pánico (México: Era, 1965), 12-13.
(4) Rita Eder, “Two Aspects of the Total Work of Art: Experimentation and Performativity,” in Desafío a la estabilidad: procesos artísticos 1952-1967. (Mexico City: MUAC/UNAM, 2014), 65-81.
(5) Jodorowsky, “Hacía el ‘efimero’ pánico o ¡sacar el teatro del teatro!”, p. 12. La reciente exposición, Desafío a la estabilidad: procesos artísticos 1952-1967 (MUAC, UNAM, 2014) fírmemente posicionó a Jodorowsky como figura central en el desarrollo de prácticas artísticas interdisciplinarias y no-tradicionales, y en relación a la generación de los artistas de la Ruptura en particular.
(6) Ibid., 15.
(7) Ibid., 13.
(8) Ibid., 12.
(9) “Documento pánico,” in Teatro pánico.
(10) Daniel Spicer, “Alejandro Jodorowsky: never belonging,” Wire (August 2015). Accessed 8/31/2015. http://www.thewire.co.uk/in-writing/columns/alejandro-jodorowsky-38280#.VeCQHbiOAqI.facebook.

 

Arden Decker es una historiadora del arte basada en Ciudad de México. Su investigación académica se centra en el desarrollo del arte efímero y las estrategias de intervención institucional en México en los 60s y 70s.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

3 solo shows at MACZUL

15°56’20.3”N – 97°16’18.1”W

Ritmohéroe

For Sale Detroit