Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

David Alfaro Siqueiros’ Cristo de la paz (1970): Realist painting and religious art in post-war Mexico

By Daniel Garza Usabiaga

Daniel Garza Usabiaga analyzes the ideological dimension of religious representation in the painting Cristo de la paz (1970) by David Alfaro Siqueiros

Daniel Garza Usabiaga analiza la carga ideológica de la representación religiosa en la pintura Cristo de la paz (1970) de David Alfaro Siqueiros

aaa-8277-001

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Cristo de la paz, 1970. Photographic silver impression on gelatin. Photography: Guillermo Zamora. Courtesy of INBA

Muralist David Siqueiros’ Cristo de la paz (Peace Christ; 1969-70) is related to a new modern-era genre, promoted by a number of governments as well as institutional entities and given over to representations of political prisoners. Additionally—and within the context of the Cold War—this artwork relates to the rebels of its day: priests who radicalized the Church’s social doctrines, guerrillas, revolutionaries, prisoners of conscience and social activists. They are rebels who, while their hands are tied and though they await their demise with temperance, remain resolute and shall not surrender. This class of artworks was generally promoted in non-communist nations, as part of abstract solutions and in allusion to treatment of prisoners of conscience in the Soviet Union and other Warsaw Pact countries.

In Cristo de la paz, Siqueiros gives this logic a twist by means of an encrypted representation. Through the figure of Christ, the muralist articulates a realist image of the political prisoner and is thus able to emphasize his and her existence in other—putatively democratic—parts of the world, then under the sway of the United States. The relationship between Christ and the prisoner of conscience is not arbitrary. Siqueiros explicitly declared “it’s worth remembering Christ was a political prisoner, crucified more because of his revolutionary political ideas than for his religious notions.” In this painting, unlike in most modern, non-figurative religious art produced in Mexico, Siqueiros managed an articulation between Catholic iconography and highly political content. The success of such a maneuver comes from a strategy of encryption, a tactic deployed in art from the Cold War period in numerous parts of the world, that introduced a “hidden” message into an image that at first glance might seem innocuous.

aaa0758-1

Siqueiros pose for El Cristo de la paz from The Vatican, 1970. Photographic silver impression on gelatin. Photography: Anonymous. Courtesy of INBA

Cristo de la paz was the sole Mexican artwork displayed when the Vatican Museum’s new contemporary art galleries opened in 1973. Its realism is of interest since it allows us to see the Catholic Church’s position on the ideological struggle between abstract and figurative art in the Cold War. Documents issued following the Second Vatican Council, an undertaking that concluded in 1965 during Paul VI’s papacy, made clear the Church lent no relevance to the dispute, making religious art a representational arena that transcended art-production-related ideological conflicts. Vatican II’s “Holy Liturgy Constitution” section entitled “Art and Sacred Objects” states “the Church never considered any particular artistic style as proper to it, but rather, adapting to different peoples’ character and conditions, as well as to various rites’ requirements, has accepted each epoch’s forms and created over the centuries an artistic treasury that merits careful conservation. Similarly, the art of our time and art of all peoples and regions must be freely exercised within the Church…”

aaa9075-1

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Cristo de la paz, 1970. Photographic silver impression on gelatin. Photography: Guillermo Zamora. Courtesy of INBA

This position stands in contrast to Pope Pius X’s 1910 encyclical entitled Sacrorum antistitum, which includes what has come to be known as the “anti-modernist oath.” It framed the Church’s position on a number of issues in the first half of the twentieth century, commenting on the impossibility of contemplating or understanding “the absolute and immutable truth as the apostles preached,” in accordance with context and historical circumstance, or, put more succinctly, “dogma cannot be altered to what each era’s culture may consider best or most appropriate.” Therefore, except in a handful of cases in certain places around the world, it can be said that Catholic art and architecture during the first half of the twentieth century were scarcely innovative and resisted actualization. It was during the 1950s and 60s that a global renovation and modernization of religious art and architecture took place. These changes emerged from a nascent modernizing impulse at the heart of the Catholic Church, that began to question Sacrorum antistitum’s “anti-modernist” position at every level, in response to the experience of the Second World War and the postwar era’s historical circumstances. In 1956, Pope Pius XII sought out a new approach to contemporary artists by inaugurating a “contemporary art section” within the Vatican Museum; several more such contemporary galleries were opened in 1973 and featured work by artists like de Chirico, André Derain, Otto Dix, Lucio Fontana, Francis Bacon and Siqueiros’s Cristo de la Paz.

aaa-8668-001

Inscription made by David Alfaro Siqueiros on the back of his work El viacrusis de Cristo, 1963. Photographic silver impression on gelatin. Photography: Jose Verde O. Courtesy of INBA

In the 1950s, Siqueiros undertook an intense promotional campaign, international in scope, traveling to several Eastern European countries as well as to the Soviet Union. In 1956, he also traveled to Egypt and India, where he was received by those nations’ presidents, Gamal Abdel Nasser and Jawaharlal Nehru, lending the journey an eminently political character. The artist’s stance expanded with a 1960 visit to Cuba, just after the triumph of its socialist revolution. He met with Fidel Castro, who sat for several portraits at the end of the 1960s and in the early 1970s. The artist’s high profile, associated with communism and an emerging group of new, unaligned lay states, whose positions skewed to socialism, possibly ended up being a problematic “disturbance” in contrast to ever-more Pan-American foreign policy that characterized then Mexican president Adolfo López Mateos’s (center-right) PRI-party administration. Siqueiros’s actions were also interpreted as a slap in the face to the president himself, who could not stand that the artist’s reception in various quarters was not unlike that offered heads of state. When the muralist returned to Mexico after visits to Cuba and Venezuela on 9 August 1960, he was sent to remand prison and accused of “crimes of social sedition.” Following a trial in which the content of his artistic production was used against him, he was jailed at Mexico City’s notorious Lecumberri prison until 13 July 1964. It was the longest period of imprisonment he ever experienced, accompanied by an absolute, state-decreed local-media blackout on the matter.

aaa-9056

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Cristo mutilado viendo al monte Calvario, 1963. Color Photograph. Photography: Anonymous. Courtesy of INBA

During his imprisonment, Siqueiros painted a series of Christ images including those known Cristo, Cristo mutilado and Cristo, redentor vencido.It is well known the artist grew up in a fervently Catholic atmosphere; the artist himself mentioned that his first encounters with art came through its religious iterations. The imagery in these paintings has a great deal to do with that background—or as much can be assumed—because of an inscription that accompanies one of the artworks. “‘May only he who believes in Christ paint Christ,’ wrote Fra Angelico. No doubt that’s why I’ve painted Him while remembering those terrible Christs I believed in as a boy.” Most of Siqueiros’s Christ images portray Him lacerated, viciously maimed and—as may have been the case with the wooden estofado-technique Christ that occupied part of Siqueiros’s jail cell—bleeding profusely. That recourse is what lends the paintings a certain expressionist nature that is underlined by a number of inscriptions the artist made on the back of the artworks. In the case of Cristo, el redentor vencido that inscription reads: “His doctrine of peace on Earth was entombed in the blood and ash of two thousand years of ever more devastating wars.”

aaa-8585-1

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Cristo del Pueblo, 1963. Photographic silver impression on gelatin. Photography: Jose Verde O. Courtesy of INBA

In addition to biographical data, we can speculate Siqueiros painted these religious images because of a certain identification between Christ’s martyrdom and the artist’s own unjust imprisonment, a relationship that fits easily into the mythology the artist sought to articulate around himself. It may be more pertinent to point out that his interest in religious painting had to do with new Church social doctrine devised over the course of the Vatican II Council, whose most active and productive years coincided with the time Siqueiros spent in jail. Clearly the artist was well apprised of the advances being generated within the Vatican and it is also quite likely that he was aware of the emergence of certain social experiments throughout Latin America that sought to reconcile Catholicism and Marxism (as an extension of new social doctrine) in everything from new community model formation (as was the case in the Mexican states of Morelos and Coahuila) to its consequent social analysis and armed conflict, as happened in Colombia and in cases such as that of Father Camilo Torres Restrepo. Siqueiros’s empathy with regard to these changes in the Catholic Church is displayed in the inscription on Cristo mutilado, clearly his most “expressionist” Christ among those he painted at Lecumberri. The accompanying text, entitled “El Viacrucis de Cristo,” states: “First his enemies crucified Him (two thousand years ago). Then “His friends” mutilated him (starting in the Middle Ages). Today His new and true friends have restored Him under communist (post-Economic Council) political pressure.” For Siqueiros, an unstinting atheist, the strength and validity of communism’s political discourse had even had an influence on the Vatican, historically one of its biggest and fiercest detractors.

Four years following his release from Lecumberri Prison, Siqueiros was among artists invited to contribute artworks to an expansion of the Vatican Museum’s “contemporary art section,” a project Pope Paul VI kicked off at a 1964 meeting held with a large assembly of artists at the Sistine Chapel. Siqueiros completed Cristo de la Paz to that end, between 1969 and 1970, when he was living in Cuernavaca and working on the mural entitled La marcha de la humanidad. Throughout those years, says Mónica Montes, the woman charged with overseeing his holdings, Siqueiros had struck up a close relationship with Bishop Sergio Méndez Arceo. It’s likely his appreciation of the Catholic Church—and specifically of Pope Paul—had increased in the years following his release from prison. On a 1965 trip to New York (that also served as background to Roman Polanski’s film Rosemary’s Baby) the pontiff openly criticized US involvement in Vietnam. The pope went on to publish the progressive 1967 encyclical entitled Populorum progressio, on labor issues, that called for just wages, job security and medical care as part of any job, at the same time it defended workers’ right to form labor unions. What’s more, the document emphasized that peace is conditioned by social justice. Populorum progressio elicited fierce criticism and a palace revolt against Paul VI, within the Vatican, on the part of a faction led by Marcel Lefebvre; Lefebvre was among those who labeled the pontiff “the communist Pope.” Siqueiros’s sympathy with regard to the Catholic Church in these years may also have grown because of the emergence (if not emergency) of Liberation Theology that came out of the 1968 Medellín Conference of Latin American Bishops.

aaa-8588

Inscription made by David Alfaro Siqueiros on the back of his work El redentor vencido, 1963. Photographic silver impression on gelatin. Photography: Anonymous. Courtesy INBA

Cristo de la paz presents a radically different image than that of the religious paintings Siqueiros completed during his years of imprisonment. Here expressionist sensibility disappears and a type of representation that could be called “heroic”—that distinguishes a number of the muralist’s artworks—enters onto the scene. Raquel Tibol described the figure in the painting using adjectives like “imposing” and “majestic.” Though cut up and bleeding, Christ’s body is whole, is not gaunt and is possessed of a firmness comparable to the male body in the 1947 painting known as Nuestra imagen actual, an artwork with which Cristo de paz is easily related in formal terms. To complete the painting, the artist recurred (as in the 1947 piece) to a photographic, or “close-up” approach. The muralist himself served as the artwork’s model and in photographs he commissioned he appears with his arms extended forward, his hands clasped and fingers intertwined as if they formed one fist, an element the artist employs as a gesture of struggle and empowerment. Christ’s fetters therefore pass to a secondary plane; the dynamic strength of the clasped hands is the element that seizes the center of the painting. Cristo de la paz expands the pose by means of Christ’s face, in profile, which exhibits no signs of weakness. The painting shows the crown of thorns and includes a beard as elements characteristic to portrayals of Christ. On the back of the artwork he would deliver to the Vatican, Siqueiros wrote out a strongly worded query to men of faith: “Christian, in over two thousand years of your doctrine, what have you done with Christ?”      

aaa8587-1

David Alfaro Siqueiros, El redentor vencido, 1963. Color Photograph. Photography: Anonymous. Courtesy of INBA

The artwork allows for a consideration of Siqueiros’s increasing appreciation of the figure of Christ, evidently seen from a secular point-of-view. As the artist wrote, “I admire Christ, but don’t get me wrong. I do not admire the religious Christ; I admire Christ as a political figure because I consider Him a rebel. Let’s be clear: Christ was the first great man to fight imperialism; He had the courage to confront powerful Roman oppressors yet with hardly any resources.”

An understanding that updated Christ’s image—something antithetical to the “anti-modernism oath”—was a commonplace in many initiatives clergy created throughout Latin America in an effort to reconcile Catholicism and Marxism in those days. It is enough to recall the best known and most radical such enunciation, from Colombian guerrilla priest Camilo Torres Restrepo: “Jesus would be a guerrilla if he were alive today.” The rebel as a postwar cultural construction took on a hip representational edge thanks to the culture industry of the era, principally Hollywood cinema, at the same time a number of figures from the social activism realm were seen as rebels in light of their questionings and struggles to undermine the status quo. Ernesto “Che” Guevara was clearly the most visible of these and his photographic portrayals, obviously, have been discussed more than once in relation to religious iconography. Besides being a rebel like Jesus, Che also became a martyr as a result of his 1967 assassination.

aaa-9183

Inscription made by David Alfaro Siqueiros on the back of his work Cristo de la paz, 1970. Color Photograph. Photography: Anonymous. Courtesy of INBA

Once it had been displayed in the Vatican Museum’s new galleries, Cristo de la paz left no doubts about Pope Paul VI and the Second Vatican Council’s position with regard to art in the context of the Cold War. Religious art ignored any ideological struggle between figuration and abstraction and was able to include figures like Siqueiros: an avowed communist and atheist whose previous work included works with a fierce anticlerical nature and who considered Jesus “(the first) Bolshevik of His time.” After symbolically handing the painting over to Pope Paul VI via the pontiff’s Mexico representative, Monsignor Rafael Vázquez Corona, Siqueiros chose to grant the public access to the artwork, reproducing and including it as one of the exterior mural panels on the Mexico City structure known as the Polyforum Siqueiros, first opened in 1971. From the point-of-view of an “encrypted work,”  Cristo de la paz’s exterior panel can be seen as an explicit political commentary of the historical context surrounding the Mexico of the time and essentially as a sort of denunciation—in the best muralist tradition—of the “dirty war” Presidents López Mateos, Gustavo Díaz Ordaz and Luis Echeverría had unleashed against hundreds of Mexican civilians. The mural Cristo de la paz not only attests to the artist’s growing admiration for the figure of Christ—as a symbol of rebellion against the societal status quo—but as well to the strategies to which the artist was obliged to recur as part of conditions surrounding artistic production at that time, to create artworks with strong critical commentary on the era’s political situation.

El caso del Cristo de la Paz (1970) de David Alfaro Siqueiros: Pintura realista y arte religioso en México durante la posguerra.

aaa-8277-001

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Cristo de la paz, 1970. Impresión fotográfica en gelatina. Fotografía: Guillermo Zamora. Cortesía de INBA.

La obra del muralista David Siqueiros Cristo de la paz (1969-70) se relaciona con un nuevo género de  la época moderna, promovido por distintos gobiernos e instancias institucionales y dedicado a representar al prisionero político. Así mismo, y dentro del marco de la Guerra Fría, esta obra se relaciona con los rebeldes de su tiempo: el cura que radicaliza la Doctrina Social de la Iglesia, el guerrillero, el revolucionario, el preso de conciencia, el activista social. Un rebelde que, aunque atado de manos y quizá esperando con templanza su final, se mantiene firme y no llega a claudicar. Este tipo de obras fueron promovidas, por lo general, en países no comunistas, bajo soluciones abstractas y aludiendo al trato de los prisioneros de conciencia en la Unión Soviética y otros países pertenecientes al Pacto de Varsovia.

En Cristo de la paz, Siqueiros da un revés a esta lógica mediante una maniobra de representación encriptada. A través de la figura de Cristo, el muralista articula una imagen realista del prisionero político y, así, logra subrayar su existencia en otras partes del globo, como en los países –supuestamente democráticos– dentro de la órbita de influencia de los Estados Unidos. La relación entre Cristo y el prisionero de conciencia, no es arbitraria y fue declarada explícitamente por Siqueiros: “Cabe decir que Cristo fue un preso político, crucificado más por sus ideas revolucionarias políticas que por sus ideas religiosas”. Es así que en este cuadro, y a diferencia de la mayor parte del arte religioso moderno de solución no figurativa realizado en México, Siqueiros logró una articulación entre la iconografía del catolicismo con un contenido altamente político. El éxito de esta maniobra se debe a una estrategia de encriptación, una táctica en operación en el arte durante la Guerra Fría en distintas partes del mundo, que introducía un mensaje “oculto” en una imagen que a simple vista podía parecer inofensiva.    

aaa0758-1

Siqueiros posa para El Cristo de la paz de El Vaticano, 1970. Impresión fotografía en plata sobre gelatina. Fotografía: Autor no identificado. Cortesía de INBA

Cristo de la paz es la única obra de un mexicano que se exhibió cuando abrieron las nuevas salas de arte contemporáneo en el Museo del Vaticano en 1973. El realismo es de interés ya que permite ver la postura de la Iglesia Católica sobre la pugna ideológica entre un arte abstracto y uno figurativo durante la Guerra Fría. En los documentos emitidos a partir del Segundo Concilio Vaticano, empresa que concluyó en 1965 bajo el papado de Paulo VI, quedó en claro que la Iglesia no daba relevancia a esta oposición, haciendo del arte religioso una arena de representación que trascendía los conflictos ideológicos en términos de producción artística. En el apartado de “El arte y los objetos sagrados” de la “Constitución sobre la sagrada liturgia” que surgió del Concilio se señala: “La Iglesia nunca consideró como propio estilo artístico alguno, sino que, acomodándose al carácter y las condiciones de los pueblos y a las necesidades de los diversos ritos, aceptó las formas de cada tiempo, creando en el curso de los siglos un tesoro artístico digno de ser conservado cuidadosamente. También el arte de nuestro tiempo y el de todos los pueblos y regiones ha de ejercerse libremente en la Iglesia…”

aaa9075-1

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Cristo de la paz, 1970. Impresión fotográfica en gelatina. Fotografía: Guillermo Zamora. Cortesía de INBA.

Esta postura contrasta con la de la encíclica Sacrorum antistitum, emitida por Pio X en 1910, que contiene lo que se conoce como el “Juramento en contra del modernismo”, y marcó la postura de la Iglesia en distintos asuntos para la primera mitad del sigulo XX, versando sobre la imposibilidad de pensar o entender la “verdad absoluta e inmutable predicada por los apóstoles” dependiendo del contexto y las circunstancias históricas, o sucintamente: “El dogma no se puede ajustar a lo que se considere mejor o más apropiado a la cultura de cada época”. Es así que, salvo contadas excepciones en algunos puntos del globo, se puede decir que el arte y la arquitectura religiosa, durante la primera mitad del siglo XX, fueron poco innovadores y se resistieron a una actualización. Es durante las décadas de los cincuenta y sesenta que sucedió una renovación y actualización a nivel global, del arte y la arquitectura religiosa. Estos cambios se deben a un naciente impulso modernizador en el seno de la Iglesia Católica, que empezó a cuestionar en todos sus niveles la postura “anti-modernista” del Sacrorum antistitum, respondiendo así a la experiencia de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y las condiciones históricas de la posguerra. Es así que en 1956, el Papa Pío XII busca un nuevo acercamiento con los artistas de su tiempo, con la instauración de una “sección de arte contemporáneo” dentro de las colecciones del Vaticano. En 1973 se inauguró la instalación de varias nuevas salas de la “sección de arte contemporáneo” en el Museo del Vaticano, con obras de artistas como Giorgio de Chirico, André Derain, Otto Dix, Lucio Fontana, Francis Bacon y Siqueiros con su Cristo de la Paz.

aaa-8668-001

Inscripción realizada por David Alfaro Siqueiros al reverso de su obra El viacrusis de Cristo, 1963. Impresión fotográfica en plata sobre gelatina. Fotografía: Jose Verde O. Cortesía de INBA.

Durante la década de los cincuenta, Siqueiros llevó a cabo una intensa campaña de promoción a nivel internacional. Visitó varios países de Europa del Este y la Unión Soviética. También viajó en 1956 a Egipto y a la India, donde se entrevistó con sus respectivos presidentes, Gamal Abdel Nasser y Jawaharlal Nehru, algo que otorgó a su viaje un carácter eminentemente político. Esta postura se acrecentó con su visita a Cuba en 1960, poco tiempo después de la consolidación de la Revolución en la isla del Caribe. En esa ocasión, se reunió con Fidel Castro, personaje del que realizó varios retratos a finales de los años sesenta y principios de los setenta. Esta posición de alta visibilidad por parte del artista, asociada al comunismo y a un grupo emergente de nuevos Estados laicos, no alineados y con una postura política tendiente al socialismo, quizá resultó problemática e incómoda dentro de los planes de la política exterior de creciente orientación panamericana que caracterizó al régimen priísta del entonces presidente de México, Adolfo López Mateos. También se interpretó como una afrenta para el mismo presidente, quien no pudo tolerar que en varios de estos lugares Siqueiros recibiera un trato similar al de un Jefe de Estado. El muralista, a su llegada a México después de visitar Cuba y Venezuela, el 9 de agosto de 1960, fue llevado a prisión preventiva argumentando en su contra el delito de disolución social. Después de un juicio, en el que se utilizó el contenido de su producción artística en su contra, fue encarcelado en Lecumberri donde permaneció hasta el 13 de julio de 1964. Este fue su periodo de encarcelamiento más prolongado, mismo que estuvo acompañado de una campaña de total oclusión pública en los medios locales decretada por el gobierno.

aaa-9056

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Cristo mutilado viendo al monte Calvario, 1963. Impresión fotográfica en color. Fotografía: Autor no identificado. Cortesía de INBA.

Durante su aprisionamiento, Siqueiros pintó una serie de imágenes de Cristo entre cuales se encuentran Cristo, Cristo mutilado y Cristo, redentor vencido. Como es sabido, el muralista creció en un ambiente fuertemente católico y, como él mencionó, su primer acercamiento con el arte fue a través de sus formas religiosas. Las imágenes de estas pinturas tienen mucho que ver con esta formación, o por lo menos así se puede suponer, por una de las inscripciones que anotó en uno de ellos: “Que sólo aquel que crea en Cristo pinte a Cristo, escribió Fra Angelico. Por eso yo lo he pintado pensando –sin duda- en aquellos terribles Cristos de pueblo en que creí cuando niño”. La mayor parte de las imágenes de estos Cristos pintadas por Siqueiros se encuentran laceradas, terriblemente mutiladas y, como quizá sucedía con el Cristo estofado que encontró en su celda, sangrantes. Este tipo de solución es lo que les otorga cierto carácter expresionista, mismo que es enfatizado con varias de las inscripciones escritas a su reverso. En el caso de Cristo, el redentor vencido la frase dice: “Su doctrina de paz en la tierra fue sepultada en la sangre y las cenizas de dos mil años de guerras cada vez más devastadoras”.

aaa-8585-1

David Alfaro Siqueiros, Cristo del Pueblo, 1963. Impresión fotográfica en plata sobre gelatina. Fotografía: José Verde O. Cortesía de INBA.

Además de hechos biográficos, se puede especular que quizá Siqueiros pintó estas imágenes religiosas a partir de cierta identificación entre el martirio de Cristo con su propio encarcelamiento injustificado, relación que fácilmente puede encajar en la mitología que el artista articuló alrededor de su persona. Más adecuado sería señalar que su interés en la pintura religiosa se debió a la nueva Doctrina Social de la Iglesia que se fue conformando en el transcurso del Concilio Vaticano II, cuyos años más álgidos y productivos coinciden con el periodo que Siqueiros pasó en prisión. Sin duda, el muralista estaba al tanto de los avances que se estaban suscitando en el seno del Vaticano; además, es muy probable, que también supiera de la emergencia de ciertos experimentos sociales que surgían a lo largo de América Latina y que trataban de reconciliar el catolicismo con el Marxismo (como una extensión de la nueva Doctrina Social), desde la formación de nuevos modelos de comunidades, como sucedió en Morelos y Coahuila en México, hasta su derivación en el análisis social y la lucha armada, como pasó en Colombia con casos como el del sacerdote Camilo Torres Restrepo. La empatía de Siqueiros hacia estos cambios en la Iglesia Católica está expuesta en la inscripción de Cristo mutilado, sin duda el Cristo más “expresionista” de los pintados en Lecumberri. El texto que acompaña esta obra se titula “El Viacrucis de Cristo” y enuncia: “Primero sus enemigos lo crucificaron (hace dos mil años). Después `sus amigos´ lo mutilaron (a partir de la Edad Media). Y hoy sus nuevos y verdaderos amigos lo restauran bajo la presión política del comunismo (post-Concilio Económico).” Para Siqueiros, un acérrimo ateo, la fuerza y validez del discurso político del comunismo había influido, inclusive, al Vaticano –históricamente, uno de sus principales y más fuertes detractores.

Cuatro años después de su liberación de Lecumberri, Siqueiros fue uno de los artistas invitados a contribuir con una obra para la expansión de la “sección de arte contemporáneo” del museo del Vaticano, proyecto arrancado por Paulo VI en la reunión que sostuvo con un numeroso grupo de artistas en 1964 en la Capilla Sixtina. El artista realizó la pintura Cristo de la Paz con este fin, entre 1969 y 1970, cuando se encontraba residiendo en Cuernavaca y construía su mural La marcha de la humanidad. Durante estos años, de acuerdo a la encargada de su acervo, Mónica Montes, Siqueiros había entablado una relación cercana con el obispo Sergio Méndez Arceo. Es probable que su apreciación hacia la Iglesia Católica, y en específico a Paulo VI, haya aumentado durante estos años desde que salió de prisión. En su viaje a Nueva York en 1965 (mismo que sirvió de fondo para la película El bebé de Rosemary de Roman Polanski), el Papa criticó abiertamente la intervención de los Estados Unidos en Vietnam. Más aún, en 1967, el Pontífice publicó su progresiva encíclica Populorum progressio que en asuntos laborales propugnaba por salarios justos, seguridad y asistencia médica como parte de cualquier empleo así como defendía el derecho de los trabajadores a conformar sindicatos. Más aún, este documento enfatizaba que la paz está condicionada a la justicia social. Populorum progressio provocó fuertes críticas y un grupo disidente real, encabezado por Marcel Lefebvre, dentro del Vaticano y en contra de Paulo VI. Lefebvre fue uno de los responsables en apodarlo como el “Papa comunista”. La simpatía de Siqueiros hacia la Iglesia Católica durante estos años quizá también se vio acrecentada por la emergencia, estrictamente hablando, de la Teología de la Liberación a partir de la Conferencia de Medellín de 1968.

aaa-8588

Inscripción realizada por David Alfaro Siqueiros en el reverso de su obra El redentor vencido, 1963. Impresión fotográfica en plata sobre gelatina. Fotografía: Autor no identificado. Cortesía de INBA.

Cristo de la paz presenta una imagen radicalmente distinta a las pinturas religiosas de Siqueiros ejecutadas durante sus años en prisión. En esta pieza desaparece la sensibilidad expresionista y entra en escena un tipo de representación que bien podría denominarse como “heroica”, misma que distingue varias de las obras del muralista. Raquel Tibol describió la figura en esta pintura con adjetivos como “imponente” y “majestuosa”. Aunque lacerado y sangrante, el cuerpo de este Cristo está entero, no flaquea y posee una firmeza comparable a la del cuerpo masculino que aparece en la pintura de 1947 Nuestra imagen actual; obra con la que fácilmente se puede relacionar formalmente. Para realizar esta pintura Siqueiros recurrió, tal como hizo en la pieza del 47, al acercamiento fotográfico o close-up. El muralista fue el modelo de esta imagen y en las fotografías que se hizo tomar aparece con los brazos extendidos hacia el frente, con ambas manos unidas y los dedos entrelazadas como si fuera un puño     –un elemento utilizado por el artista como gesto de lucha y empoderamiento. Las ataduras, así, pasan a segundo plano; la fuerza dinámica de las manos empuñadas es el elemento que acapara el centro de la pintura. Dicha postura es acrecentada en esta obra mediante el rostro que se encuentra de perfil sin mostrar signo de debilidad. Cristo de la paz presenta la corona de espinas y cuenta con una barba como elementos característicos en la representación de Jesús de Nazaret. En el reverso de esta obra que sería enviada al Vaticano, Siqueiros anotó un fuerte cuestionamiento a los hombres de fe: “Cristiano: ¿qué has hecho de Cristo en más de dos mil años de su doctrina?”

aaa8587-1

David Alfaro Siqueiros, El redentor vencido, 1963. Impresión fotográfica en color. Fotografía: No identificado. Cortesía de INBA.

En esta obra se puede ponderar sobre el aprecio que Siqueiros fue adquiriendo por el personaje de Cristo, visto, evidentemente, desde una perspectiva secular; en sus palabras: “Yo admiro a Cristo, pero no quiero que se me malentienda. No admiro al Cristo religioso; admiro a Cristo como político porque lo considero un rebelde. Entendamos: Cristo fue el primer gran hombre que luchó contra el imperialismo; tuvo el valor de enfrentarse casi sin recursos a los poderosos opresores romanos”.

El entendimiento que actualiza la imagen de Cristo, algo antitético al “Juramento en contra del modernismo”, era regla común en muchas de las iniciativas creadas por el clero a lo largo de América Latina, que trataron de reconciliar Catolicismo y Marxismo durante esos años. Baste recordar la más conocida y radical enunciación al respecto, dicha por el sacerdote guerrillero colombiano Camilo Torres Restrepo: “Si Jesús estuviera vivo hoy, sería un guerrillero”. El rebelde como construcción cultural de la posguerra adquirió una representación puntual a través de la industria cultural de la época, principalmente en las películas de Hollywood –mientras varios personajes, en el campo de la acción social, fueron vistos como rebeldes en cuanto a su cuestionamiento y lucha por subvertir el estado de las cosas. El más visible de estos fue sin duda Ernesto Guevara, cuyas fotografías, dicho sea de paso, han sido discutidas en más de una ocasión en relación con la iconografía religiosa. El “Che” no era tan solo un rebelde como Jesús sino también, como él, se convirtió en un mártir al ser asesinado en 1967.

aaa-9183

Inscripción realizada por David Alfaro Siqueiros en el reverso de su obra Cristo de la paz, 1970. Impresión fotográfica en color. Fotografía: Autor no identificado. Cortesía de INBA.

Es así que, una vez expuesto en las nuevas galerías del Museo de Vaticano, Cristo de la paz dejaba en claro la posición de Paulo VI y el Concilio Vaticano II en términos de arte dentro del contexto de la Guerra Fría. El arte religioso desconocía la pugna ideológica entre figuración y abstracción y daba cabida aún a personajes como Siqueiros: profeso comunista, ateo, cuya producción anterior incluía obras de fuerte carácter anticlerical y quien consideraba a Jesús como “un bolchevique de su tiempo (el primero).” Después de entregar este cuadro simbólicamente a Paulo VI a través de su representante en México, monseñor Rafael Vázquez Corona, Siqueiros decidió darle acceso público a esta obra; la reprodujo e incluyó como uno de los paneles murales en el exterior del Polyforum Siqueiros (inaugurado en 1971). Desde una perspectiva de “obra encriptada”, el panel exterior del Cristo de la paz puede ser visto como un comentario político explícito al contexto histórico de esa época en México; básicamente, como una especie de denuncia –en la mejor tradición del muralismo- a la “guerra sucia” librada, hasta ese entonces, por los presidentes Adolfo López Mateos, Gustavo Díaz Ordaz y Luis Echeverría, en contra de cientos de civiles en México. Con el mural de Cristo de la paz no sólo se constata la creciente admiración que tuvo el muralista hacia la figura de Cristo, como un símbolo de rebeldía en contra del estado de las cosas en la sociedad, sino también las estrategias a las que tuvo que recurrir bajo las condiciones de producción artística de la época, para articular obras con un potente comentario crítico hacia las condiciones políticas de aquel momento.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Cada vez que me encuentro con la muerte pienso en ti

34° Panorama da Arte Brasileira

ArchivoAbierto

Construyendo puentes. Arte chicano/mexicano de LA a CDMX