Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

LAPÜSIROU’MAANA. On dreaming and talking

By Eusebio Siosi and María Isabel Rueda

The Wayuu artist and the Cartagena artist speak about the importance of the traditional feminine practice of divination through dreaming in the Wayuu culture and how to integrate these forms of knowledge in the contemporary world and in environmental preservation.

El artista Wayuu y la artista cartagenera hablan sobre la importancia de la práctica tradicional femenina de la adivinación a través del sueño en la cultura Wayuu y de cómo integrar estas formas de conocimiento en el mundo contemporáneo y en la preservación de la naturaleza.

33

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

María Isabel Rueda: Is it very hard to be an artist and survive in Colombia’s La Guajira province? How did you manage it?

Eusebio Siosi: It’s not hard. I think being an artist is a profession that lets me have contact with an “outside” world through constant training. I can posit different issues when it comes to the social, the cultural or the political. I had an advantage in that respect. In addition to my architecture studies, I was part of an artistic movement called the Taller libre de la Ciudad in Barranquilla. I received training there on putting up shows and artists’ forums. Over time some of those artists became good friends with whom I’ve been able work and collaborate, just like you and I are doing now by talking.

I was born in Riohacha, the capital of La Guajira province. I belong to the Wayuu indigenous ethnicity, specifically from the Ipuana clan. To the degree that my age and possibilities allow, my role in the community is that of empowerment; I act as a knowledge and traditions transmitter when it comes to Wayuu culture and our region. I support making artists’ production processes visible through exhibitions and exchanges with other regions. In my role as cultural agent, I identify with the “make and do/think and act” strategy. I’m looking to foster dialogue between art and the general public. These are tools that help me with the language and uses of certain perceptive routes (i.e., strategies for disrupting perceptive routines) that I’ve developed alongside a number of training processes. It’s been a long-term endeavor. I’ve been an artist for twenty-six years. I like collective work and collaborating with different kinds of people and leaders; it’s a way for me to help transform thought and improve quality of life in society. At the Autonomous University of Barranquilla’s Caribbean Academy of Art and Gymnastics I did body-expression modules in 1991. In 1999 I took up live art at performance workshops and in 2004, I began doing the research I call Barreras visuales, where I stop to analyze and observe the Wayuu cosmogony in light of acculturation from the Western world. I supported performance work more through the organizational arm of the Laboratorios de Investigación en Artes in the Caribbean region, from 2005 to 2015. Personally, I think it’s been very important to undertake different kinds of artistic training. I’ve moved through different levels of the material and the supernatural worlds.

7

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

2-

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

MIR: Los sueños de la Ouutsü, (The Dreams of the Ouutsü), your latest video, produced on two channels, is the outcome of personal research on Wayuu traditions and ancestral roots, around which you’ve been working in a very specific way. In this performance, you connect a corpus of wisdom and ritual that comes from your ethnic group, such as the yonna dance and the ritual of the soñadoras (i.e., “women dreamers”). For those of us who are unaware of that dance’s particulars, explain a little something about all its varied dimensions and tell us how you’re able to relate it to your performance in the role of the Ouutsü in your community.

ES: The Yonna is a dance and/or rite with various symbolic connotations that survives in the Guajira culture. It features three attributes I consider essential: the search for social equilibrium, collective solidarity and the man-cosmos relationship. Basically, we Wayuu regroup through this dance that consolidates and perpetuates our traditions.

In the Yonna dance, women wear colorful tunics, shawls, necklaces and bracelets at the wrist and ankles; the men wear guayuco-style loin-cloths, a Wayuu hat and dance to the rhythm of a drum called the Kasha. We do this dance for considerations that are special to Wayuu material and spiritual life, such as offerings, revelations, healing or for a girl’s “coming out” to society as a woman. The dance (or indeed ceremony) takes place in a circular space called a Piui, by order of the Aseyuu (the spirit) of the Lania (i.e. an amulet or charm the Wayuu wear on their bodies for protection). The dance serves to exhibit and view the walaa (a figure in gold with both human and animal characteristics that some Wayuu families own). Wealth is guaranteed to those who possess them.

I conserve identity-related elements from the Ouutsü ritual, to be used in actions, such as red fabric, a revitalizing element and energy connector between the material, the spiritual and sound. There is a one-maraca movement that signals the ritual’s commencement, featuring circular movements spiraling out, an intermezzo with movement in different, perpendicular directions, then the end of the spiral movement as it moves inward. Sound is very important within my proposal since it demarcates timed movements and actions from one space to another.

8

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

14

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

In Wayuu tradition, the importance women have had within the community’s social and religious life is particularly notable. Woman is the protecting image of the social and cultural component. Her particularity is based on the traditional knowledge she possesses about nature itself. In communities, it is thought that woman is the repository of traditional wisdom, through which she oversees the proper use of medicinal plants and determines a universe that implies mastery over medical-religious practices. Her special status in social life is instituted based on her faculty for establishing communication with a certain principal of her nature, considered her incorporated through dream manifestations or voluntarily induced trances. It is believed that through feminine faculties these spirits are charged with revealing the origins of diseases as well as their categories and the sundry treatments to be followed to assure the future of an ailing patient.

A female religious expert is distinguished with the name of Ouutsü. As a religious healer, an Ouutsü woman constitutes a central image in the community, given that she possesses virtues and special attributes that allow her to communicate with the natural and supernatural realms. Her figure constitutes a spiritual authority around which revolve matters both human and divine. Her vocation as an intermediary between the Wayuu and the supernatural world allows her to remedy disasters the spirits of illness inflict. In essence, it is woman who possesses the power of healing words and who pronounces the voice that dialogues with supernatural forces. From its religious context, the Wayuu world comes to us linked to rhythm and to the devotion of woman as the mystic unit associated with the land, as well as values of life-protection, renovation and permanence. In the family unit, the Ouutsü woman safeguards the meaning of motherhood and transmits knowledge through ritual and artistic practices, in which she experiences maximum supernatural contact with life.

27

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

33

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

MIR: Is this faculty of the Ouutsü exclusive to women? Or can men with such a sensibility also be dreamers among your people?

ES: It is a role more related to women because of their degree of sensibility when it comes to entering trances. This is not common in men, but if it were the case a man would be just as respected for the work he was doing and the recognition he gained.

MIR: How does anyone know she or he is a soñador, a dreamer? Or is it a faculty that is passed down from generation to generation?

ES: An Ouutsü is identified through widespread recognition of her faculties, which serve to solidify her name through the works she performs. Such recommendations are spread by oral tradition, an important communication element among the Wayuu. Knowledge is handed down from generation to generation, and consists of the Ouutsü, by means of dreams, choosing whom should be called to prepare herself. It starts with isolation, flour-based foods, beverages and recognizing medicinal plants. That said, I’m sorry to report that the Ouutsü is disappearing from our culture. Lots of Wayuu girls are put into boarding schools that distance them from their traditional customs; they take on another kind of life. Today, the women-dreamers are disappearing.

MIR: A world that could prevent conflicts through dreams, yet with no spiritual entities that must be consulted… It’s so sad! The voice of the woman who dialogues is no longer heard. So why bother with the consultations?

ES: Dreams help us prevent things, make decisions, act as the Ouutsü instructs; they are highly helpful allies, since it is through this process you learn to develop intuition. You have to know how to distinguish when a dream is normal and when it’s different. When a dream is recurrent and elicits some sense of tension, you have to look for a response. That’s when you consult an Ouutsü, to see how a conflict can be resolved; that’s why they’re also called mediators. In my case, when I dream of something out of the ordinary, I know I shouldn’t speak of it so that, because it’s at the top of my mind, the dream will come true. But sometimes you have to know how to speak of it, as a way of looking for an answer. It can be related to premonitions. Asking about a dream depends on whether or not you believe. That’s the starting point.

23

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

35

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

MIR: What does the community do so that something as individual as a dream can become a collective work involving everyone?

ES: We Wayuu believe and recognize this activity as a generator of change and answers. Being aware of how the act of telling experiences and events, orally, contributes to collective work creates a commitment to undertake this kind of ritual. To do it, you need to involve a great deal of the population, from the people who slaughter cattle to the ones who make the food. A lot bring food, depending on how long the isolation is going to be, determined by the type of work you’re trying to perform.

3

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

5

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

The isolation could be in a rural hamlet where it becomes a social action, where food is shared for as long as needed and to which anyone can come, according to what the Ouutsü decides. The Yonna dance is performed non-stop, at all times. The dancers spin around and there must be food offerings such as fiche with bread or arepa; coffee or chicha; goat stew or rice with guajiro beans, lots of food, an order from the Ouutsü. That way you keep the spirits contented—which is necessary for the ritual to have its effect.

MIR: So as a Wayuu, do you believe someone can ask for help, or fight, from the supernatural realm, to solve specific problems in the everyday world?

ES: Naturally. You can ask the supernatural for help or to steer situations of conflict. That’s what happens with feuds between clans, family groups like the Ipuana in my case. If we want to know what’s the best way to act, we arrange a consultation and keep the interpretation in mind as a way to move forward. You can also get “antidotes,” that serve to drive problems away. There are lots of ways to do things.

MIR: Who are your allies in the supernatural world? What natural or supernatural forces do you trust, or from which do you ask for support, in the realm of the unseen?

ES: My spirits, who somehow send signs through dreams or circumstances. I’ve learned to watch out for disturbances and to put a bit of red fabric beneath my pillow to ward them away. To take certain precautions against the uncommon. I believe a thread or a red scrap is a transmitter of energies. I’ve had uncommon experiences. Knowing my grandmother was a dreamer and understanding that because of that, this faculty can be handed down, has allowed me to interpret this in my own manner as a way of knowing how to act. Presenting this experience through art contributes to the land and strengthens Wayuu customs in the various spaces where I can share experiences. It means I can be consulted and can offer guidance.

MIR: Why do the Wayuu believe we inhabit such different worlds? Put another way, why does it seem like we don’t understand you or your problems or that we can’t help you?

ES: You do understand us and it’s very common for you to seek us out to solve some problem. But what happens is that most of the time the consultation is made in secret. It’s an act of respect and recognition of our qualities; it spreads to other areas because it’s so effective. That’s why the Ouutsü are sought after for the kinds of works that have had a repercussion in the region. Collective benefit can be achieved, through the satisfaction that lies in the solution that falls to a family or clan, or the resolution of a conflict. This gives rise to the peace and tranquility needed to move through the world without problems. Wayuu people have their own ways of surviving. The problem is the influence of the Western world and the way changes are brought about. I recognize Christian religion is having a disappearing effect on a figure as im- portant to the Wayuu culture as the Ouutsü, just as it does on the dancers, without realizing it’s destroying a cultural process.

MIR: What do the Wayuu see in society as it is today that we are unable to understand?

ES: We see the destruction of the land, where the monetary interests of the government and of politicians comes first, with no awareness of how it affects the ecosystem and degrades it, with no measure of the causes and effects. Sadly, the influence of arijunas—cultural outsiders—affects us greatly, as does our education in institutions that distance us from our traditions. This leads some Wayuu to think to some degree that because they’re educated, they can exert a greater amount of influence and therefore start to make decisions above those of traditional Wayuu authorities. There are other cases where, for instance, a highway can bring changes or subjection when arijunas get involved with Wayuu, so the “more civilized” one ends up influencing. It’s important to armor yourself so it won’t happen. A Wayuu evinces solidarity and is faithful. But he can change if the dynamic is altered in the negative.

MIR: The Wayuu see values in society we don’t. What are they?

ES: Respect for the value that lies in conservation. Asking permission from nature, from the land, from plants as a way to guide your actions.

Eusebio-Souci-en-la-usurpadora

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (instalation view), La Usurpadora at Espacio Odeón, Bogotá, Colombia, 2015. Two-channel HD video, 16 min. Courtesy of La Usurpadora.

33

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

LAPÜSIROU’MAANA. Sobre el valor de soñar y conversar.

María Isabel Rueda: ¿Es muy difícil ser artista y sobrevivir en la Guajira? ¿Cómo lo has logrado?

Eusebio Siosi: No es difícil; considero que ser artista es una profesión que me permite tener contacto con un mundo “exterior” a través de una formación constante. Puedo plantear distintos temas en lo social, cultural y político. Tuve una ventaja en este aspecto y es que aparte de mis estudios de arquitectura, hice parte de un movimiento de arte llamado Taller Libre de la Ciudad en Barranquilla; ahí recibí formación en el aspecto de montaje de exposiciones y convocatorias con artistas. Con el tiempo algunos se convirtieron en buenos amigos con los que he podido trabajar y colaborar, así como lo hacemos ahora tú y yo al conversar.

Nací en el municipio de Riohacha, capital de La Guajira. Pertenezco a la etnia Wayuu del clan Ipuana. En la medida de mis años y mis posibilidades, mi papel dentro de la comunidad es de empoderamiento; funjo como transmisor de conocimientos y costumbres concernientes a la cultura Wayuu y nuestra región; apoyo la visibilización de los procesos de producción de los artistas a través de exposiciones e intercambios con otras regiones. Me identifico con la estrategia de “hacer/pensar y actuar” en mi papel de gestor cultural, buscando el diálogo con el arte y la población. Éstas son herramientas que me ayudan en el lenguaje y utilización de distintas RUTAS PERCEPTIVAS (estrategias para ruptura de rutinas perceptivas), que he desarrollado a través de muchos procesos de formación; ha sido un proceso a largo plazo. Como artista llevo 26 años. Me gusta el trabajo colectivo y de colaboración con distintas clases de poblaciones y líderes, pues así puedo ayudar en la transformación del pensamiento y mejorar la calidad de vida en la sociedad. En la Academia de Arte y Gimnasia del Caribe de la Universidad Autónoma de Barranquila realicé módulos de expresión corporal en el año 1991. En 1999 retomo el arte vivo a través de talleres sobre performance y a partir del año 2004 realizo investigaciones que llamo Barreras Visuales, donde me detengo a analizar y observar la cosmogonía Wayuu frente a la aculturación con el mundo occidental; afianzo más el trabajo de performance a través de la coordinación de los Laboratorios de Investigación en Artes en la región Caribe, del 2005 al 2015. Personalmente, creo que ha sido muy importante desarrollar una formación con distintos perfiles, he transitado por distintos niveles del mundo material y sobrenatural.

7

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

2-

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

MIR: Los sueños de la Ouutsü, tu último video realizado a dos canales, es el resultado de una investigación personal sobre las tradiciones y raíces ancestrales Wayuu, alrededor de las cuales has venido trabajando de una forma muy particular. En este performance relacionas una serie de saberes y rituales provenientes de tu etnia, como lo es el baile de la Yonna y el ritual de las soñadoras. Para los que desconocemos las particularidades de ese baile, explícanoslo un poco en todas sus dimensiones y cuéntanos cómo logras relacionarlo en tu performance con el rol de la Ouutsü en tu comunidad.

ES: La Yonna es un baile y/o rito de múltiples connotaciones simbólicas que se mantiene dentro de la cultura guajira y que tiene tres atributos que considero esenciales: la búsqueda del equilibrio social, la solidaridad colectiva y la relación entre el cosmos y el hombre. Básicamente, los Wayuu nos reencontramos a través de este baile que consolida y perpetúa nuestras tradiciones.

En la Yonna las mujeres utilizan mantas coloridas, pañolones, collares y pulseras colocadas en la muñeca y tobillos, los hombres lucen wayucos, un sombrero Wayuu y danzan al son de un tambor o kasha. Esta danza se realiza por motivos especiales de la vida material y espiritual del Wayuu, tales como ofrecimiento, revelaciones, curaciones o por la salida y presentación de una niña como mujer en sociedad. Esta danza o ceremonia se realiza en un espacio circular llamado piui, por mandato de Aseyuu (espíritu) de las lania (amuleto o aseguranza que guardan los Wayuu en su cuerpo para protegerse). Es para exponer y ver el walaa (figura en oro con características humanas y animales que poseen algunas familias Wayuu). A quien lo posee, éste le asegura riquezas.

Del ritual de la Ouutsü rescato elementos identitarios, que son utilizados dentro de la acción, como la tela roja, un elemento dinamizador y conector de energía entre lo material, lo espiritual y el sonido. Hay un movimiento de una maraca para determinar el inicio del ritual con movimientos circulares en espiral hacia afuera, el intermedio con movimiento en sentidos perpendiculares en distintas direcciones y la finalización del movimiento de espiral hacia adentro. El sonido es muy importante dentro de mi propuesta, ya que demarca movimientos y acciones puntuales de un espacio a otro.

8

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

14

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

En la tradición cultural de la etnia se destaca la importancia que ha tenido la mujer dentro de la vida social y religiosa de la comunidad, donde es ella la imagen protectora del componente social y cultural. Su particularidad se fundamenta a partir de los conocimientos tradicionales que posee acerca de la propia naturaleza. En la comunidad se considera que la mujer es la depositaria de los saberes tradicionales, mediante los cuales administra el uso adecuado de las plantas medicinales y determina un universo que implica el dominio de las prácticas médico-religiosas. Su condición especial en la vida social se halla instituida a partir de su facultad para establecer comunicación con cierto principio de su naturaleza, considerado como su espíritu auxiliar, el cual se suele incorporar a través de manifestaciones en sueños o a partir de trances que son inducidos voluntariamente. Se considera que a partir de las facultades femeninas, estos espíritus se encargan de revelar el origen de las enfermedades, así como sus categorías y los diversos tratamientos que deben seguirse para garantizar el porvenir de un paciente quebrantado.

Una experta religiosa se distingue con el nombre de Ouutsü. Como médica religiosa, la mujer Ouutsü constituye una imagen central en la comunidad, puesto que ella posee las virtudes y los atributos especiales para comunicarse con el mundo natural y sobrenatural. Su figura constituye una autoridad espiritual en torno a quien giran los asuntos humanos y divinos, y su oficio como intermediaria entre los Wayuu y el mundo de lo sobrenatural permite sanar las calamidades ocasionadas por los espíritus de las enfermedades. En esencia, es la mujer que posee el poder de las palabras curadoras y pronuncia la voz que dialoga con las fuerzas sobrenaturales. A partir de su contexto religioso, el mundo Wayuu sobreviene atado al ritmo y a la entrega de la mujer como unidad mística asociada al territorio y a los valores de protección, renovación y permanencia de la vida. En la unidad familiar, la mujer Ouutsü conserva el significado de la maternidad y trasmite el conocimiento a través de prácticas rituales y artísticas, donde ella experimenta el máximo contacto sobrenatural con la vida.

27

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

33

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

MIR: ¿Esta facultad de la Ouutsü es exclusiva de las mujeres o pueden los hombres con ese tipo de sensibilidad también ser soñadores dentro de tu etnia?

ES: Es un papel más relacionado a las mujeres por el grado de sensibilidad que tienen para lograr el trance; en los hombres no es común, pero si se da el caso, de igual manera se respeta por la trayectoria que va adquiriendo y su reconocimiento.

MIR: ¿Cómo sabe uno que es soñador? ¿O es una facultad que se pasa de generación en generación?

ES: Una Ouutsü se identifica por tener gran reconocimiento de sus facultades, ya que éstas van consolidando su nombre a través de los trabajos que realizan. Estas recomendaciones se dan por medio de la tradición oral, que es un elemento importante de comunicación entre los Wayuu. El conocimiento se transmite de generación en generación y consiste en escoger a través de un sueño a quién debe llamar la Ouutsü para su preparación. Se da inicialmente con un encierro, con comidas a base de harinas, bebidas, reconocimiento de plantas medicinales. Sin embargo, es muy triste comunicarles que la Ouutsü está desapareciendo en nuestra cultura. Muchas niñas Wayuu son internadas en colegios que las alejan de sus costumbres tradicionales y adquieren otro tipo de vida. Hoy en día están desapareciendo las soñadoras.

MIR: Un mundo que podría prevenir sus conflictos a través de sus sueños pero sin entidades espirituales a las cuales consultárselos. ¡Qué triste! La voz de la mujer que dialoga ya no es escuchada. Entonces, ¿por qué consultar?

ES: Los sueños ayudan a prevenir, a tomar decisiones, a actuar según lo indique la Ouutsü, y son aliados de gran ayuda, pues en este proceso se aprende a desarrollar la intuición. Hay que saber distinguir cuándo un sueño es normal y cuándo es diferente. Cuando un sueño es común y causa cierta tensión hay que buscar una respuesta, ahí es cuando se consulta a una Ouutsü, para mirar de qué manera se puede solucionar un conflicto, por eso también son llamadas mediadoras. En mi caso, cuando sueño algo distinto a mi acontecer cotidiano, sé que no lo debo contar para que se cumpla teniendo en cuenta el sueño. A veces hay que saber contarlo para buscar una respuesta, puede estar relacionado a las premoniciones; el consultar un sueño depende de si crees o no crees, ese es el punto de partida.

23

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

35

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

MIR: ¿Cómo hace la comunidad para que algo tan individual como un sueño se convierta en un trabajo colectivo que los involucra a todos?

ES: Los Wayuu creemos y reconocemos esta actividad como generadora de cambios y respuestas. El ser consciente de cómo el acto de contar experiencias y acontecimientos de manera oral contribuye al trabajo colectivo, genera en uno el compromiso para la realización de este ritual. Para esto se involucra una gran parte de la población, desde quienes matan las reses hasta los que preparan los alimentos. Muchos llevan alimentos dependiendo del tiempo del encierro; éste es determinado por el tipo de trabajo que se busca.

3

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

5

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (still), 2015. Video HD a dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora, Puerto Colombia.

El encierro puede ser en una ranchería en donde se convierte en un acto social, donde se comparte comida el tiempo que sea necesario y donde cualquiera puede llegar, según lo decida la Ouutsü. El baile de la Yonna se ejecuta sin descanso todo el tiempo, los danzarines se van turnando, se debe brindar comida como el fiche con bollo o arepa, el café, la chicha, sopa de chivo, arroz con fríjol guajiro, comida en abundancia como un pedido de la Ouutsü. De esta manera se mantiene a los espíritus contentos, lo que es necesario para que haga efecto el ritual.

MIR: ¿Entonces como Wayuu crees que se puede pedir ayuda o luchar desde el reino de lo sobrenatural para solucionar problemas puntuales en el día a día?

ES: Sí, claro, se puede pedir ayuda a lo sobrenatural, para direccionar situaciones de conflicto. Es el caso de los enfrentamientos entre clanes (grupos de familia), por ejemplo, en mi caso, el clan Ipuana. Si queremos saber cuál es el mejor modo de actuar, se consulta y se tiene en cuenta la interpretación para proceder. De igual forma se pueden obtener contras, que servirán para desviar los problemas. Existen muchas maneras.

MIR: ¿Quiénes son tus aliados en el mundo sobrenatural? ¿A qué fuerzas naturales o sobrenaturales te confías o pides apoyo en el mundo de lo no visible?

ES: A mis espíritus, que de alguna manera me avisan a través de los sueños o circunstancias. He aprendido a estar atento a las perturbaciones y a poner un pedazo de tela roja debajo de la almohada para alejarlas, a tener cierta prevención ante lo no común, a creer que un hilo o una tela roja son transmisores de energías. He tenido experiencias no comunes. Saber que mi abuela era una soñadora y entender que, por ende, esta facultad se puede trasmitir, me ha permitido interpretar esto a título personal para saber cómo actuar. Dar a conocer esta experiencia a través del arte aporta al territorio y afianza las costumbres de los Wayuu, en los distintos espacios donde pueda compartir experiencias. Esto me permite ser consultado y guiar.

MIR: ¿Por qué creen los Wayuu que habitamos mundos tan diferentes? Es decir, ¿por qué pareciera que nosotros no los entendemos a ustedes en sus problemas o no podemos ayudarlos?

ES: Ustedes sí nos entienden y es muy común que nos busquen intentando solucionar un problema, lo que pasa es que en la mayoría de los casos la consulta se realiza en secreto. Es un acto de respeto y reconocimiento de nuestras cualidades y traspasa territorios por su efectividad, de esta manera son buscadas las Ouutsü, por los tipos de trabajos que han tenido repercusión en la región. Se puede lograr el beneficio colectivo, por la satisfacción en la solución que compete a una familia o clan, así como la solución de un conflicto. Esto genera paz y tranquilidad para poder transitar sin problemas en el territorio. El Wayuu tiene sus propias formas de sobrevivir, el problema es la influencia del mundo occidental y la forma en que realizan los cambios. Reconozco que la religión cristiana está afectando para que desaparezca este personaje tan importante dentro de la cultura Wayuu como lo es la Ouutsü, al igual que los danzantes, sin tener en cuenta que destruyen un proceso cultural.

MIR: ¿Qué ven ustedes en la sociedad, cómo está hoy en día que nosotros somos incapaces de entender?

ES: Se ve la destrucción de un territorio, donde prima el interés monetario del gobierno y los políticos, sin tener en cuenta cómo afecta al ecosistema y lo deteriora, sin medir las causas y efectos. Desgraciadamente nos afecta mucho la influencia de los arijunas (ajenos a la cul- tura) y la formación de los Wayuu en instituciones educativas que los alejan de sus costumbres y los llevan a pensar hasta cierto punto que, por ser educados, pueden tener un grado superior de influencia y de esta forma empezar a tomar decisiones por encima de las autoridades tradicionales Wayuu. Hay otros casos en los que, por ejemplo, una carretera puede traer cambios o sometimiento, al involucrarse los arijunas con los Wayuu, y en este sentido termina influyendo el “más civilizado”; es importante blindarse para que esto no suceda. El Wayuu es solidario y fiel y puede cambiar si se altera la relación de manera negativa.

MIR: Ustedes ven valores en la sociedad que nosotros no vemos. ¿Cuáles son?

ES: El respeto del valor de conversar y pedir permiso a la naturaleza, a la tierra, a las plantas para actuar.

Eusebio-Souci-en-la-usurpadora

Eusebio Siosi, Los sueños de la Ouutsü (vista de instalación), La Usurpadora en Espacio Odeón, Bogotá, Colombia, 2015. Video HD dos canales, 16 min. Cortesía de La Usurpadora.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Doges

Sed del infinito: Edgar Cobián and Octavio Abúndez at Museo de Arte de Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico

Baroque and Chasm

Archivo Alexander Von Humboldt