Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

21ª Bienal de Arte Contemporáneo Sesc_Videobrasil: “Comunidades Imaginadas”

Por Cecília Floresta Sesc 24 de Maio, São Paulo, Brasil October 9, 2019 – February 2, 2020

From left to right: Paulo Mendel e Vitor Grunvald, Domingo, 2018 (video); Brett Graham, Monument to the Property of Peace and Monument to the Property of Evil, 2017 (installation comprised of wood and metal); Nidal Chamekh, Never Give Up, 2017 (video 15’); Jim Denomie, Off the Reservation (Or Minnesota Nice), 2012 (oil on canvas) & Standing Rock, 2016, 2018 (oil on canvas); Emo de Medeiros, Chromatics Movement I and Movement II, 2017-2019 (an installation comprised of video and paper); No Martins, #JÁBASTA!, 2019 (acrylic on various fabrics). Photo courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

When Possible, What Dialogues Could There Be?

24 de Maio Street in the city of São Paulo is narrow as if it was a single tongue that reverberates it’s entire reflexive rambunctious through the pavement. A single tongue that branches into several, for in these surroundings that people who migrate are present, from remote places or the margins of the city. With tall buildings on both sides, on this street, there is almost no horizon. I think about how much a body that does not see horizons has to say, in comparison to how much a person that sees them ahead.

On one side of 24 de Maio Street, the imposing side façade of the Municipal Theater whose stairs house bodies that do not enter the interior. On the other side, a corner of Plaza de la República can be seen, and my eyes cannot fail to see the bodies that walk there; the Largo do Arouche extends circularly ahead. There are no horizons, but it may be possible to imagine them after all. That is what we glimpse at the 21st Sesc_Videobrasil Contemporary Art Biennial, with the curatorship of Gabriel Bogossian, Luisa Duarte and Miguel A. López, along with the 55 artists that comprise it: imaginary horizons

The title of the exhibition, Comunidades imaginadas [Imagined communities], opens many questions on the communal in terms of the way in which systems and institutions treat and make the subject visible. Firstly: what bodies are denied in the process of community creation, when for many, the community becomes essential every day for physical and symbolic survival? Aren’t communities, in addition to conjunctions, forced on some bodies as a means to separate them from spaces that a priori do not correspond to them? The sense of community has turned very disturbing when interpreted institutionally in different ways by different groups, in contrast to the reality of others whose communality lives under a concrete and constant threat. I mean, although community spaces do indeed dynamite a general white-hetero-cis-normalized idea of nation, some communities are usually placed in a stereotyped and minority scope as a way to contain, delegitimize or diminish them in terms of their importance.

From left to right: Hrair Sarkissian, Execution Squares, 2008 (series of 14 photographs); Paulo Mendel e Vitor Grunvald, Domingo, 2018 (video); Brett Graham, Monument to the Property of Peace and Monument to the Property of Evil, 2017 (installation comprised of wood and metal). Photo courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

The community, for many people, responds to multiple possibilities: it sustains the individual inherent in us, gives volume to the voices to make themselves heard together, and allows sharing joys or setbacks that arouse resistance. That social communal tissue in the Videobrasil exhibition is portrayed in Domingo, by Paulo Mendel and Vitor Grunvald, a video-documentary that introduces us to the LGBTQIA+ Stronger collective, an emotional family created and formed by young people from the peripheries present in 50 cities in Brazil. This work reminds us that certain communities are seen as riots that, according to State officials, need to be pacified or dismantled, as if the community threatened an alleged order. What in fact occurs mainly when the community sees the possibility of autonomy, something we see in Voçoroca, a project by the #VoteLGBT collective. It is precisely that pursue for autonomy within the community that suggests that traffic on the margins can often be directed to the center without necessarily escaping through the gaps, jumping real or imaginary walls that the state of things does not stop lifting.

The memory of the registered objects was something strongly captured in my journey through the exhibition. My steps were carried by the gaze that settled on one of the collections that compose it, Joias africanas, which, together with the symbolic dimensions of André Griffo, brought to light the memory of the metal, so painful for some, remembering the forced dissolutions of freedom and the tools of enslaved cultivation of an alien land, when in memory they could be valuable and delicate artifacts, endowed with ancestrality and identity. Next, Natalia Skobeeva’s Biographies of Objects video, whose disposition invites a zenith perspective, illustrates in verbal and iconographic profusions how objects contain identities and how narratives focus on the pieces that make up the imaginary and collective knowledge that survives time, representing what belongs to us as a mirror in which we see ourselves, when we have mirrors within reach.

Further on, Claudia Martínez Garay molds de memory of clay, it evokes the ancestral wisdom that indicates that we are made of the same clay that will swallow us, also remembering that regardless of thoughts about life and death, objects perdure as vestiges that reflect those circular reflections. Cycles likewise are remembered by the video installation What is left of the sugar cubes? by Thierry Oussou, in which sugar emerges in historical and socioeconomic meanings, to reaffirm the maxim that indicates that people without memory is not a nation, and how said memory, is conditioned by the loss and gain of institutions that decide what to keep as heritage or simply destroy.

From left to right: Claudia Martinez Garay, ¡KACHKANIRAQKUN! / ¡SOMOS AÚN! / ¡WE ARE, STILL!, 2018 (Installation comprised of fired clay, bricks, metal, iron, painting with acrylic and clay on panel); Jonathas de Andrade, Procurando Jesus, 2013 (installation, 20 prints framed in copper plate, 16 acrylic plaques, tray, dates, and cedarwood box). Copyright photo: Courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

If objects are stored as material memory, the boundaries that unite and separate identity narratives are imaginary and mobile. An example of this instability would be Procurando Jesus [Procuring Jesus], an installation by Jonathas de Andrade who photographed faces of men in Jordan whose features could belong to a Jesus devoid of a white imaginary. The work is accompanied by a series of testimonies of which one of them summarizes the border idea linked to the meanings recorded here: “At that time there were no borders. If you want to choose Jesus today, he will have to come from somewhere. That’s the problem.”

The place where we come from matters and the spaces where we are allowed to travel depend on it. Then, we can say that for some there are very well defined boundaries by whoever owns the chalk, the one who draws and erases the lines that constrict—a reflection that makes it possible to materially revisit the performance of Marton Robinson. However, perhaps these borders can also be dissolved by the encounter, when a desire for proximity exists, as in the photographs of Georges Senga, a true game with those mirrors, which, in an image of distance and approach between the urban territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Brazil, shows, in the course of the eyes, places that mix—almost do not differ in the awakening of memory—perhaps only by movement, idiomatic signs, objects.

Still located in a dialogue in the borders, my perception drew a line, very common by the way, in the exhibition space that almost delimited a place for bodies and voices whose desire goes far beyond the lines of possession, towards the sacred and total territory condition. I understand the depth that can be reached at the confluence, but I wonder if the stories cannot be rethought, pluralized. In the show, there are several approaches to original peoples, of course, but by arranging them in a supposed union or unique community, I perceived, would it not also erase their particularities? The unity of force is necessary, but I think that establishing it in formal spaces can also lead to an identity planning movement, where dialogue and contrasts are lost.

In dialogue with the sewing of memories, the words of Patrice Lumumba in E’ville, by Nelson Makengo, who, taking the images’ background that record the ruins of the present, remember how the decolonial is absorbed into our bodies, mouths, and letters for longer than we usually remember. Weaving these memories into beads, Tela bordada [Embroidered Cloth], an action conceived by Teresa Margolles, proposes a work achieved by women in a cloth from the morgue while telling their stories, contrasting an object with remains of death and violence with the life contained in the narratives. Even in this sense, Luiz de Abreu brings back the memory of the political body that dances, but in which, profoundly stereotyped deep marks also appear.

From left to right: Emo de Medeiros, Chromatics Movement I and Movement II, 2017-2019 (an installation comprised of video and paper);No Martins, #JÁBASTA!, 2019 (acrylic on various fabrics); Ezra Wube, Hidirtina / Sisters, 2018 (video, 9’14’’). Photo courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

Köken Ergun, Binibining Promised Land, 2010 (video installation comprised of 3 videos and magazine covers). Photo courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

What unites and also separates can be done in several ways as long as there is no disparity between heights. That was what I thought when I looked into the space that my feet declared the last (or first?) of the exhibition, and I found myself in front of the video of Mohau Modisakeng, which captures movements in a loop whose impression is of incompleteness and recurring expectation, evoking in acts and words, a Tsuana proverb present in the title of the work that says: Phiri o rile ga bose gangwe, which translates: “The hyena spoke: the dawn does not come once.” On the other side of the space, I found Nidhal Chamekh’s Never Give Up, which records an act of autonomous resistance by refugee groups whose camp was attacked, so they are forced to leave their community, setting fire to their improvised homes before others did. In the middle of the consumption of fire, we see the inscription “Never give up” resonating in the same renewal element of the movement in the eternal break of dawn.

Another tangible topic in the biennial is the forced disputes or divisions of territories, which we see juxtaposed in Tomaz Klotzel’s installation. Likewise, No Martins allows us to glimpse territorial disputes even in words, in its series of portraits that recover newspapers headlines loaded with stereotypes, denouncing, through the work, the violence and media barriers that represent racialized people, in a dialogue with Emo de Medeiros and his device that brought to light subconscious apartheids that emerge in the naturalization of a language that imposes damage through both automatic and well-designed racialization mechanisms.

The almost labyrinthine circular movement, proposed by the exhibition’s museology and culminating in imaginary dialogues between the works, also occupied other spaces of Sesc 24 de Maio, without pointing to answers, but to possibilities of creation in multiple horizons delineated by these approaches and distances that presuppose community creation or community disposition. The conjugation of the expressivities, which overflow the possible interconnections, occurred in the exhibition with a proposal that seeks to extrapolate even the dialectic, often found diminished and set aside in exhibition spaces. Thus, put together, the works enabled imagined communities in infinite combinations, mainly causing tensions of palpable order that exceed the walls of the building.

Cecília Floresta Afro-descendant, Candomblezeira, and Lesbian, was born in the capital of São Paulo one of those mornings in December, it was sunny and it was the year 1988. He makes a living by publishing books, narrative and poetic Yoruba ancestral research and his developments in the contemporary Black diaspora, lesbians and insurgent literature. He has two books published poems crus (Patuá, 2016) and la zine genealogia (móri zines, 2019).

De izquierda a derecha: Paulo Mendel e Vitor Grunvald, Domingo, 2018 (video); Brett Graham, Monument to the Property of Peace and Monument to the Property of Evil, 2017 (installation comprised of wood and metal); Nidal Chamekh, Never Give Up, 2017 (video 15’); Jim Denomie, Off the Reservation (Or Minnesota Nice), 2012 (oil on canvas) & Standing Rock, 2016, 2018 (oil on canvas); Emo de Medeiros, Chromatics Movement I and Movement II, 2017-2019 (an installation comprised of video and paper); No Martins, #JÁBASTA!, 2019 (acrylic on various fabrics). Photo courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

Cuando posible, ¿qué diálogos puede haber?

La calle 24 de Maio en la ciudad de São Paulo es estrecha como una sola lengua a través de la cual pasan bullicios que reverberan reflexivos en el asfalto. Una sola lengua que se ramifica en varias, pues aquí en los alrededores se hacen presentes personas que migran, oriundas de lugares alejados o de los extremos de la ciudad. Con edificios altos a ambos lados, sobre esta calle, casi no hay horizonte. Pienso en cuanto tiene que decir un cuerpo que no ve horizontes, en relación a cuanto más puede decir uno que los ve por delante.

De un lado de la calle 24 de Maio, la imponente fachada lateral del Teatro Municipal cuyas escaleras albergan cuerpos que no ingresan al interior. Del otro, se distingue una esquina de la Plaza de la República, y mis ojos no pueden dejar de ver los cuerpos que ahí caminan al margen; el Largo do Arouche se extiende circularmente más adelante. No hay horizontes, pero tal vez sea posible imaginarlos después de todo. Eso es lo que vislumbramos en la 21ª Bienal de Arte Contemporáneo Sesc_Videobrasil, con la curaduría de Gabriel Bogossian, Luisa Duarte y Miguel A. López, junto a lxs 55 artistas que la componen: horizontes imaginarios.

El título de la muestra, Comunidades imaginadas, inaugura muchos cuestionamientos sobre lo comunitario en cuanto a la manera en que sistemas e instituciones tratan y visibilizan el tema. De antemano: ¿qué cuerpos son negados en el proceso de creación de comunidades, cuando para muchxs, lo comunitario se vuelve cotidianamente esencial para la supervivencia física y simbólica? Las comunidades, además de conjunciones, ¿no son forjadas para algunos cuerpos como un medio con el fin de separarlos de espacios que a priori no les corresponden? El sentido de comunidad ha sido muy inquietante al ser interpretado institucionalmente de diferentes maneras por diferentes grupos, en contraste con la realidad de otrxs cuya comunalidad vive bajo una amenaza concreta y constante. Quiero decir, aunque los espacios comunitarios en efecto dinamitan una idea general blanco-hetero-cis-normalizada de nación, algunas comunidades suelen ser colocadas en un alcance estereotipado y minoritario como una forma de contenerlas, deslegitimarlas o disminuirlas en cuanto a su importancia.

From left to right: Hrair Sarkissian, Execution Squares, 2008 (series of 14 photographs); Paulo Mendel e Vitor Grunvald, Domingo, 2018 (video); Brett Graham, Monument to the Property of Peace and Monument to the Property of Evil, 2017 (installation comprised of wood and metal). Photo courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

La comunidad, para mucha gente, responde a múltiples posibilidades: sostiene lo individual inherente al nosotros, da volumen a las voces para hacerse oír en conjunto, y permite compartir alegrías o contrariedades que despiertan resistencia. Ese tejido social comunitario en la muestra de Videobrasil es retratado en Domingo, de Paulo Mendel y Vitor Grunvald, un video-documental que nos presenta al colectivo LGBTQIA+ Stronger, una familia afectiva creada y formada por jóvenes de las periferias presentes en 50 ciudades de Brasil. Dicha obra nos recuerda que ciertas comunidades son vistas como disturbios que, según los funcionarios estatales, necesitan pacificarse o desmantelarse, como si la comunidad amenazara un supuesto orden. Lo que de hecho ocurre principalmente cuando lo comunitario atisba la posibilidad de autonomía, algo que vemos en Voçoroca, proyecto del colectivo #VoteLGBT. Es precisamente esa búsqueda de autonomía dentro de lo comunitario lo que hace pensar que el tránsito en los márgenes muchas veces puede direccionarse al centro sin necesariamente escapar por las brechas, saltando muros reales o imaginarios que el estado de las cosas no deja de levantar.

La memoria de los objetos registrados fue algo fuertemente capturado en mi recorrido a través de la muestra. Mis pasos fueron llevados por la mirada que se posó en una de las colecciones que la componen, Joias africanas, la cual, en conjunto con las dimensiones simbólicas de André Griffo, trajo a la luz la memoria del metal, tan dolorosa para algunxs, recordando las forzadas disoluciones de libertad y las herramientas del cultivo esclavizado de una tierra ajena, cuando en la memoria podrían ser artefactos valiosos y delicados, dotados de ancestralidad e identidad. En seguida, el video Biographies of Objects de Natalia Skobeeva, cuya disposición invita a una mirada cenital, ilustra en profusiones verbales e iconográficas cómo los objetos contienen identidades y cómo las narrativas se centran en las piezas que conforman el conocimiento imaginario y colectivo que sobrevive al tiempo, representando lo que nos pertenece como un espejo en el que nos vemos a nosotrxs mismxs, cuando tenemos espejos al alcance.

Más adelante, la memória de la arcilla es moldeada por Claudia Martínez Garay, evoca la sabiduría ancestral que indica que estamos hechos de la misma arcilla que nos engullirá, recordando también que independientemente de los pensamientos sobre vida y muerte, los objetos resisten como vestigios que reflejan aquellas reflexiones circulares. Ciclos a su vez recordados por la videoinstalación What is left of the sugar cubes?, de Thierry Oussou, en la cual emerge el azúcar en significados históricos y socioeconómicos, para reafirmar la máxima que señala que un pueblo sin memoria no es un pueblo y cómo esa memoria está condicionada a merced de las pérdidas y ganancias de instituciones que deciden qué conservar como patrimonio o simplemente destruir.

From left to right: Claudia Martinez Garay, ¡KACHKANIRAQKUN! / ¡SOMOS AÚN! / ¡WE ARE, STILL!, 2018 (Installation comprised of fired clay, bricks, metal, iron, painting with acrylic and clay on panel); Jonathas de Andrade, Procurando Jesus, 2013 (installation, 20 prints framed in copper plate, 16 acrylic plaques, tray, dates, and cedarwood box). Copyright photo: Courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

Si los objetos se guardan como memoria material, las fronteras que unen y separan narrativas identitarias se muestran imaginarias y móviles. Un ejemplo de esta inestabilidad sería Procurando Jesus, instalación de Jonathas de Andrade quien fotografió rostros de hombres en Jordania cuyas facciones podrían pertenecer a un Jesús desprovisto de imaginario blanqueado. La obra es acompañada por una serie de testimonios de los cuales uno de ellos resume la idea fronteriza ligada a los significados aquí registrados: “En aquella época no había fronteras. Si tú quieres elegir a Jesús hoy, él tendrá que venir de alguna parte. Ese es el problema.”

El lugar de donde provenimos importa y los espacios por donde nos es permitido transitar dependen de ello. Entonces, podemos decir que para algunxs hay fronteras muy bien delimitadas por quien posee la tiza, aquel que dibuja y borra los trazos que delimitan —una reflexión que permite revisitar materialmente el performance de Marton Robinson. Sin embargo, tal vez estas fronteras también pueden ser disueltas por el encuentro, cuando hay deseo de acercamientos, como sucede en las fotografías de Georges Senga, un verdadero juego con aquellos espejos, que, en una imagen de alejamiento y acercamiento entre el territorio urbano de la República Democrática del Congo y Brasil, muestra, en el recorrer de los ojos, lugares que se mezclan –casi no se difieren en el despertar de la memoria– tal vez sólo por el movimiento, letreros idiomáticos, objetos.

Todavía ubicada en un diálogo en las fronteras, mi percepción trazó una línea, muy común, por cierto, en el espacio de exhibición que casi delimitaba un lugar para cuerpos y voces cuyo deseo va mucho más allá de las líneas de posesión, hacia la condición sagrada y total de territorio. Entiendo la profundidad que se puede alcanzar en la confluencia, pero me pregunto si las narraciones no se pueden repensar, pluralizar. En la muestra hay varias aproximaciones sobre los pueblos originarios, por supuesto, pero al disponerlas en una supuesta unión o comunidad única que percibí, ¿no sería también borrar sus particularidades? La unidad de fuerza es necesaria, pero pienso que establecerla en espacios formales también puede dar lugar a un movimiento de planificación identitaria, donde se pierde el diálogo y los contrastes.

En diálogo con la costura de las memorias, las palabras de Patrice Lumumba en E’ville, de Nelson Makengo, quien, tomando el fondo de las imágenes que registran las ruinas del presente, recuerda cómo lo (de)colonial se absorbe en nuestros cuerpos, bocas y letras desde hace más tiempo del que solemos recordar. Tejiendo estos recuerdos en cuentas, Tela bordada, una acción ideada por Teresa Margolles, propone una obra manejada por mujeres en una tela de la morgue mientras se cuentan sus historias, contrastando un objeto con restos de muerte y violencia con la vida contenida en las narraciones. Aún en este sentido, Luiz de Abreu trae en retrospectiva el recuerdo del cuerpo político que baila, pero en el que también aparecen profundas marcas forzadamente estereotipadas.

De izquierda a derecha: Emo de Medeiros, Chromatics Movement I and Movement II, 2017-2019 (an installation comprised of video and paper); No Martins, #JÁBASTA!, 2019 (acrylic on various fabrics); Ezra Wube, Hidirtina / Sisters, 2018 (video, 9’14’’). Photo courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

Köken Ergun, Binibining Promised Land, 2010 (video installation comprised of 3 videos and magazine covers). Photo courtesy of Videobrasil. Photographer: Everton Ballardin

Lo que une y también separa puede hacerse de varias maneras siempre que no haya disparidad entre las alturas. Eso fue lo que pensé cuando miré hacia el espacio que mis pies convirtieron en el último (¿o el primero?) de la muestra, y me encontré con el video de Mohau Modisakeng, que captura en un loop movimientos cuya impresión es de incompletitud y recurrente espera, evocando en acto y palabra, un proverbio tsuana presente en el título de la obra que dice: Phiri o rile ga bose gangwe, que se traduce: “La hiena habló: el amanecer no llega una sola vez”. Del otro lado del espacio, me encontré con Never Give Up de Nidhal Chamekh, el cual registra un acto de resistencia autónoma por parte de grupos de refugiadxs cuyo campamento fue atacado, por lo que se ven obligadxs a abandonar su comunidad, incendiando las viviendas improvisadas antes de que otros lo hicieran. En medio del consumo de fuego, vemos la inscripción “nunca te rindas” resonando en el propio elemento de renovación del movimiento en el eterno comienzo del amanecer.

Otro tema tangible en la bienal sson las disputas o divisiones forzadas de territorios, que vemos yuxtapuestas en la instalación de Tomaz Klotzel. De igual forma, No Martins nos permite vislumbrar disputas territoriales incluso en la palabra, en su serie de retratos que rescatan los titulares de periódicos cargados masivamente de estereotipos, denunciando, a través de la obra, la violencia y las barreras mediáticas que representan a las personas racializadas, en un diálogo con Emo de Medeiros y su dispositivo que trajo a la luz apartheids subconscientes que emergen en la naturalización de un lenguaje que impone daños por medio de mecanismos de racialización tanto automáticos cuanto bien diseñados.

El movimiento circular, casi laberíntico, propuesto por la museografía de la exposición y que culminó en diálogos imaginarios entre las obras, también ocupó otros espacios de Sesc 24 de Maio, sin apuntar a respuestas, sino a posibilidades de creación en múltiples horizontes delineados por estas aproximaciones y distancias que presuponen la creación comunitaria o dispuesta en comunidad. La conjugación de las expresividades, que desbordan las posibles interconexiones, se produjo en la exposición en una propuesta que busca extrapolar incluso la dialéctica, a menudo encontrada disminuida por un lado en los espacios de exhibición. Así, puestas en conjunto, las obras posibilitaron comunidades imaginadas en infinitas combinaciones, provocando principalmente tensiones de orden palpable que sobrepasan las paredes del edificio.

Cecília Floresta afrodescendiente, candomblezeira y lesbiana, nació en la capital paulista una de esas mañanas de diciembre, hacía sol y era el año 1988. Se gana la vida editando libros, investigaciones narrativas y poéticas yorubas ancestrales y sus desarrollos en la diáspora Negra contemporánea, las lesbianas y la literatura insurgente. Tiene dos libros editados poemas crus (Patuá, 2016) y la zine genealogia (móri zines, 2019).

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mano alzada

Cuerpo de esta sombra

Hacia una arquitectura medioambiental

Al objeto encantado