Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Ursula Böckler: photographs from the “Magical Misery Tour” with Martin Kippenberger, at SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo

By Tenzing Barshee SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo, Brazil 02/11/2017 – 03/11/2017
tmb_seaside

Ursula Böckler, Untitled, 1986. Courtesy of the artist and SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

Misery

São Paulo-based exhibition space “SOLO SHOWS” recently mounted an exhibition of the early photographic work of Ursula Böckler. The selection of photographs came entirely from her 1985/86 trip to Brazil with German artist Martin Kippenberger and they tell a complicated story.

She doesn’t remember the month exactly. It might have been August or September 1985 when she met Kippenberger at a bar in Cologne. At the time, she had been doing editorial photo jobs for the music magazine Spex, which was publishing the writing of Jutta Koether and Diedrich Diedrichsen. She would bring her camera to concerts, bars and clubs, documenting the nightlife of cold-war West Germany that saw parts of its economy booming, the rise of alternative culture, and a persisting fear of an imminent nuclear fallout. Kippenberger was already a local hero, a notorious artist, a dancing drunkard. Someone who fuelled his own mythology as much as he had fun with the dismantlement of his artist identity, a dynamic that ultimately led to the lasting image of his life and work—the quirky legend.

vitrine

Ursula Böckler, Untitled, 1986. Courtesy of the artist and SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

Kippenberger approached Böckler about hiring her as a photo assistant for his upcoming art project. He was about to travel to Brazil, cynically labelling the trip as his own “Magical Misery Tour”. In a typical Kippenbergian gesture, the wording was borrowed from the almost eponymous event by The Beatles, mimicking pop culture, allowing the real world to spill into his work, only to color it in the absurd, feed it back and have it clash with the actual conditions of the world. But what were these conditions? Firstly, the title served as a conceptual umbrella for a German artist travelling to a so-called exotic destination, making his language serve as a shaky justification by supposedly establishing critical distance through the use of grotesque humour and self-exposure. This raises the question whether his knowledge of the complicated representation of his intentions, his destination and the language in between, qualifies the fact that he did travel to Brazil in a position of supposed cultural authority, stumbling around in touristic excitement, making everything his own.

P1000437

Installation view. Ursula Böckler: The photographs from the “Magical Misery Tour” with Martin Kippenberger, Brazil, 1986. Courtesy of the artist and SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

Basically, does knowing that you are using your power—while exposing the fact by making a fool of yourself—ease the grief of those who are being used? Not really. “At the time,” Böckler says, “we called Brazil the Third World”. Is this why he called the trip his “misery” tour? When read today, the attribute “magical” seems almost more problematic, as it romanticizes the supposed misery, but, as we are dealing with Kippenberger’s work here, it’s helpful to consider his multifaceted language and views of the world, his perspective so to speak. The idea of misery relates to the artist himself, again feeding the artist’s mythology but also his refusal to comply with the complexities of representation itself. In a time when many were criticizing the autonomous image or object as a capitalist tool of manipulation, trying to understand it in its socio-political context, Kippenberger infused his work with his trademark anti-aura, playing the smartest fool in the room. His wit, which he parades in many of his works, functions a lot through his language, which was based on colloquial German speech, which, in turn, adds a provincial quality. This further complicates the work in terms of an international reception and subversively questions its authority.

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

Ursula Böckler, Untitled, 1986. Courtesy of the artist and SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

In December 1985, Kippenberger threw a going-away party at the disco  “Alter Wartesaal” (“The old waiting room”), where Ursula Böckler met him a few months before. “Kippi, please come back!” was emblazoned across a large picture of Sugarloaf Mountain. Coming back was always part of the deal. In Brazil, the two embarked on road trips that took them to destinations such as Maceió, Recife, Brasília and Manaus. The idea was that Kippenberger would do impromptu performances, many of them in front of a variety of landmarks (monuments, public sculptures, advertisement, etc.), photographed by Ursula Böckler. This culminated in his acquisition of a gas station and titling it “Tankstelle Martin Bohrmann” (“gas station Martin Bohrmann”), Bohrmann was a former Nazi who was suspected to be hiding in Brazil. “Bohrmann” translates into “the man who drills”. This performance later became a sculpture, which is now part of the Museum Folkwang in Essen. This gesture reads again in multi-layered ways, first of all, it is disturbing that a German artist buys Brazilian real estate and turns it into his art, which mainly has a European audience, simply because he can. But then, by infusing the problematic aspect of his German identity into the work, by referencing the German Nazi legacy, the collective trauma and the issue of how “to drill” this memory, in a way, empowers his authoritative position but only to undermine it, not unlike how he continuously distorted his artist identity, by playing the drunken fool for example. Travelling around Brazil he pushed this subject, even his outfit supported this image of ridicule, wearing white sport socks and parading his beer belly.

tmb_color_01

Ursula Böckler, Untitled, 1986. Courtesy of the artist and SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

In Ursula Böckler’s account, this created uncomfortable moments, when, at times, it became embarrassing to witness his (very white, very male) performance. The quality of embarrassment, looking at it today, seems to have furthered the intention to affirm the problematic aspects of one’s identity in order to expose its fallacies. This dynamic somehow comes to rest when confronting Ursula Böckler’s work. Even though he wanted his actions to be documented, both of them, especially Böckler herself, insisted that her photographs would stand as their own autonomous works, a position they’re asserting as compelling independent images. Considering this, Ursula Böckler’s photographs communicate different issues; they document Kippenberger’s “Magical Misery Tour”; they show the so-called “Third World” through the attentive lense of a talented young photographer; they expose the silliness of the whole trip, the tensions of intimacy between travellers and their destination, while respectfully facing both the artist as a tourist as well the country as a host. In this way, the problems of this project weren’t resolved but perhaps the inability of reconciling was genuinely portrayed by Ursula Böckler.

tmb_seaside

Ursula Böckler, Sin título, 1986. Cortesía de la artista y SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

Miseria

El espacio para exposiciones ubicado en São Paulo, SOLO SHOWS, recientemente montó una exposición del trabajo fotográfico temprano de Ursula Böckler. La selección de fotografías proviene en su totalidad de su viaje a Brasil en 1985/86 con el artista alemán Martin Kippenberger, y cuenta una historia complicada.

Ella no recuerda exactamente el mes. Debe haber sido agosto o septiembre de 1985 cuando conoció a Kippenberger en un bar en Colonia. Por entonces, había estado haciendo trabajos editoriales de fotografía para la revista de música Spex, la cual publicaba escritos de Jutta Koether y Diedrich Diedrichsen. Llevaba su cámara a conciertos, bares y discotecas, documentando la vida nocturna de la Alemania Occidental de la guerra fría que veía parte de su auge económico, el surgimiento de una cultura alternativa, y el miedo persistente a una inminente lluvia nuclear. Kippenberger ya era un héroe local, un artista célebre, un borracho bailarín. Alguien que fomentaba su propia mitología y que se divertía con el desmantelamiento de su identidad de artista, una dinámica que finalmente condujo a una imagen duradera de su vida y su trabajo –la leyenda extravagante.

vitrine

Ursula Böckler, Sin título, 1986. Cortesía de la artista y SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

Kippenberger le propuso a Böckler contratarla como asistente de fotografía para su próximo proyecto de arte. Estaba a punto de viajar a Brasil, calificando cínicamente el viaje como su propio “Magical Misery Tour” [Tour mágico de la miseria]. En un gesto típicamente Kippenbergiano, las palabras eran tomadas del evento casi homónimo de The Beatles, imitando la cultura pop, permitiendo que el mundo real se derramara en su trabajo, sólo para teñirlo en lo absurdo, devolverlo y estrellarlo contra las condiciones reales del mundo. ¿Pero cuáles eran estas condiciones? Primeramente, el título servía como una sombrilla conceptual para un artista alemán viajando a un destino llamado exótico, haciendo que su lenguaje sirviera como una justificación vacilante al supuestamente establecer una distancia crítica a través del uso de humor grotesco y la autoexposición. Esto plantea la cuestión de si era que su conocimiento de la complicada representación de sus intenciones, su destino y el lenguaje en medio de ello, califica el hecho de que él viajó a Brasil en una posición de supuesta autoridad cultural, tropezando en emoción turística, haciéndolo todo suyo.

P1000437

Vista de instalación. Ursula Böckler: The photographs from the “Magical Misery Tour” with Martin Kippenberger, Brazil, 1986. Cortesía de la artista y SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

Básicamente, ¿el saber que estás usando tu poder –mientras expones el hecho quedando en ridículo- alivia la pena de aquellos que están siendo usados? No realmente. “En ese entonces,” dice Böckler, “llamábamos a Brasil el tercer mundo”. ¿Es por esto que él denominó su viaje el tour “de la miseria”? Cuando se lee hoy, el atributo “mágico” parece casi más problemático, pues idealiza la supuesta miseria, pero, como estamos tratando aquí con el trabajo de Kippenberger, ayuda considerar su lenguaje y vistas del mundo multifacéticos, su perspectiva por así decirlo. La idea de la miseria se relaciona con el artista mismo, una vez más alimentando su mitología, pero también su negativa a cumplir con las complejidades de la representación misma. En una época en que muchos criticaban la imagen u objeto autónomo como herramienta capitalista de la manipulación, intentando entenderlo en su contexto sociopolítico, Kippenberger imprimió en su trabajo su marca anti-aura, jugando a ser el tonto más inteligente de la habitación. Su ingenio, el cual presume en muchos de sus trabajos, funciona mucho a través de su lenguaje, el cual se basa en el habla coloquial alemana, el cual, a su vez, agrega una cualidad provincial. Esto complica aún más el trabajo en términos de una recepción internacional y cuestiona subversivamente su autoridad.

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

Ursula Böckler, Sin título, 1986. Cortesía de la artista y SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

En diciembre de 1985, Kippenberger hizo una fiesta de despedida en la disco “Alter Wartesaal” (“La vieja sala de espera”), donde Ursula Böckler lo conoció unos meses antes. “¡Kippi, por favor regresa!” decía a lo largo de una larga imagen de Pão de Açúcar. Regresar siempre era parte del trato. En Brasil, los dos se aventuraron en viajes de carretera que les llevaban a destinos como Maceió, Recife, Brasilia y Manaus. La idea era que Kippenberger hiciera performances impromptu, muchos de ellos en frente de una variedad de puntos de referencia (monumentos, esculturas públicas, anuncios, etc.), fotografiados por Ursula Böckler. Esto culminó con la adquisición de una gasolinera, titulándolo “Tankstelle Martin Bohrmann” (“gasolinera Martin Bohrmann”), Bohrmann era un antiguo nazi, quien se sospechaba se escondía en Brasil. “Bohrmann” se traduce como “el hombre que taladra”. Este performance se volvió después una escultura, la cual forma parte ahora del Museum Folkwang en Essen. Este gesto se lee otra vez en diversos niveles, antes que nada, es perturbante que un artista alemán compre bienes raíces brasileños y lo convierta en arte, cuya audiencia es principalmente europea, simplemente porque puede. Pero luego, imprimiendo el aspecto problemático de su identidad alemana en la pieza, al hacer referencia al legado alemán nazi, el trauma colectivo y la cuestión de cómo “taladrar” su memoria, en un modo, empodera su posición autoritaria pero sólo para desvirtuarla, no diferente a cómo él continuamente distorsionó su identidad de artista, jugando al tonto borracho por ejemplo. Viajando alrededor de Brasil forzó este sujeto, incluso su atuendo soportaba esta imagen de ridículo, vistiendo calcetas blancas y luciendo su panza chelera.

tmb_color_01

Ursula Böckler, Sin título, 1986. Cortesía de la artista y SOLO SHOWS, São Paulo.

Según cuenta Ursula Böckler, esto creó momentos incómodos, cuando, a ratos, se volvía vergonzoso presenciar su (muy blanco, muy masculino) performance. La calidad de vergüerza, viéndolo hoy en día, parece haber ido más allá de la intención de afirmar los aspectos problemáticos de la identidad de uno para exponer sus falacias. De alguna manera, esta dinámica descansa cuando se confronta el trabajo de Ursula Böckler. A pesar de que él quería que se documentarán sus acciones, ambos, especialmente la misma Böckler, insitieron en que sus fotografías se sostuvieran como obras autónomas, una posición que reafirmaban como imágenes independientes. Considerando esto, las fotografías de Ursula Böckler comunican diferentes cuestiones; documentan el “Magical Mistery Tour” de Kippenberger; muestran el llamado “tercer mundo” a través del atento lente de una talentosa y joven fotógrafa; exponen lo tonto de todo el viaje, las tensiones de intimidad entre viajeros y su destino, mientras se enfrentan respetuosamente ambos, el artista como turista y el país como anfitrión. De esta manera, los problemas de este proyecto no fueron resueltos, pero tal vez la imposibilidad de reconciliación fue genuinamente retratada por Ursula Böckler.

Tags: , , , , , ,

The Secret Garden

Vacío museal. Medio siglo de museotopías peruanas (1966-2016)

Djamil

Concentrations 57: Slavs and Tatars