Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Talking Back to Power: Tania Bruguera at YBCA, San Francisco

By Emily K. Holmes San Francisco, California, USA 06/16/2017 – 10/29/2017

Tania Bruguera, Escuela de Arte Útil, 2017–ongoing. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

Before I even entered the building of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA), Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder presented itself to me in the form of a bold orange billboard. Placed in an exterior courtyard facing a busy downtown San Francisco intersection, the billboard at the time stated quite plainly: “There is no ambiguity. End white supremacy now,” presented only days after President Trump dismissively equated the violent actions of white supremacists to their counter-protestors in Charlottesville, VA. The sign’s words, I later learned, came from YBCA staff rather than the artist herself. However, the sign is part of her projects, and the responsiveness to current events falls right in line with Bruguera’s goal to activate regional-specific politics in the everyday through her exhibitions and artistic practice. For Bruguera, this is not “just art,” and we are not –ever– “only” in an art gallery.

As I rounded the corner, Bruguera’s art confronted me again. This time, in her own words through an electronic billboard that tallied yes or no votes to the prompt, “Borders kill. Should borders be abolished?” I gazed at the 800-some yeses and the 300-plus no’s, feeling the weight of a different simple, but hefty statement.

When I entered the exhibition, her artwork again caught me off-guard, but this time with an ancient-looking creature. In the center of the room stood a formidable life-size figurine covered in thick dirt. With nails sticking out all over its body, the eyeless figure was menacing. Only thin, pale plastic hands were uncovered to reveal the mannequin underneath.

A video projection showed a performance in which this creature “came to life” –with a human underneath the caked mud– and walked out of a gallery, into the streets. Inspired by the Kongos’ (of the Democractic Republic of the Congo) power figure nkisi nkondi, Destierro (Displacement, 1998-99) represents the spirit of the Cuban people who awakens in order to make good on the promise of revolution that has yet to happen; even without this specific cultural context, the artwork haunted me as a symbol of a popular consciousness, political betrayal, and a building hunger for change. It’s an appropriate set of themes to introduce Bruguera’s thirty-year career.

Tania Bruguera, Referendum, 2015–16. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

The exhibition is the first survey of Bruguera’s long-term projects, and the curators included a good deal of context to help American viewers (who may be less familiar with Bruguera) to understand the artist’s specific methods. Though she’s not a household name by any means, her notoriety as an artist who’s been arrested and detained multiple times by the Cuban government in the past several years has received mainstream media attention.

Unlike other contemporary artists who stir up news headlines, Bruguera is uninterested in shock value –though this statement might be hard to accept regarding an artist who more than once played suicidal Russian roulette while reading her manifesto on making art that fosters social engagement. Autosabotage (Self-Sabotage, 2009) seems out of character for Bruguera’s practice, at least within this exhibition. What does carry over into the other works is the artist’s unwavering, confidence as she calmly interrupts established social norms.

In contrast to that work, most of Bruguera’s projects are performative and participatory. They are staged in a way that seamlessly integrates the artwork’s actions into real life, tinged with an imaginative, philosophical, and socially-minded optimism.

Tania Bruguera, Tatlin’s Whisper #6 (Havana Version), 2009. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

For example, the tally for the electronic ticker outside the building comes from a voting ballet inside the gallery –Bruguera’s Referendum (2015-16). Top of mind in California is the treacherous, arid, and heavily policed land between the United States and Mexico, with Trump’s insistence on building a border wall and recent pardoning of brutalist Sheriff Joe Arpaio. As I dropped my vote inside the tin ballot box, I wondered how much my participation mattered. It felt like almost like a game. I’d be another vote for abolishing borders, yes, but what about beyond the scope of the gallery? Days later, I’d realize that may be exactly the point: to spur viewers like me to ask ourselves the same question.

Another artwork relies more heavily on participation –and raises the stakes higher. The 2009 performance, Tatlin’s Whisper #6 (Havana Version), gave a literal platform to Cubans to speak freely for one-minute. The stage and podium, backed by a lush gold curtain, was re-installed in YBCA’s gallery; footage of the performance can only be viewed by stepping up to the screens of two video cameras on tripods. The weight of this art, this action in Cuba is underscored by the government’s suppression of Bruguera’s request to recreate the work in 2014. This work is part of her commitment to useful art (arte útil). In a video clip [1] Bruguera stated, “I hope [that] one day freedom of speech in Cuba doesn’t have to be a performance.” This framing helps me understand the works that verge on game-like in their simplicity. It’s this hope that drives Bruguera’s questioning to audiences and to governments –to all humans.

Tania Bruguera, Immigrant Movement International, 2010–ongoing. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

As another aspect of this complex, thorough exhibition, Bruguera activated Escuela de Art Útil (School of Useful Art, 2017­-ongoing) by inviting local art students to participate in special coursework. Although documentation of the classes remains in the gallery in the form of notes and video footage, the archived space left little for other viewers to explore—a sense that the moment had passed.

In contrast, a nearly empty gallery absorbed my attention. Held within an airy room with draped banners, Immigrant Movement International (Movimiento Migrante International, 2010-ongoing) is a flexible project that focuses on global immigrant rights. A manifesto printed onto the walls in both Spanish and English (and available in printouts in other languages) held my gaze as I sat on a circular bench. Although I was the only visitor at the time, the architecture distinctly suggested a gathering space.

This specific gallery is dedicated for free access as a meeting space for local regional organizations working on immigrants’ rights during the exhibition’s run. This new project, Party of Migrant People’s Assembly (2017), was created for YBCA. No, let me correct myself: The project was created for people, and is within YBCA.

It’s a reminder to me that for Bruguera, and for us if we choose it, a gallery is more than a room for art. Activating a space, voting “without consequence,” and a performed platform for free speech are art works, and they are more than art. With Bruguera’s projects, we can test out new realities and attempt seemingly unfeasible goals. But what does this really do?

Tania Bruguera, Self-sabotage, 2009. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

Bruguera prompts us to recall that we are always in the world, always engaged with power, and art is only one way of manifesting ideas that can lead to new ways of being and living. From her early works like Destierro or Autosabotage to her ever-evolving Escuela de Arte Útil and Immigrant Movement International, Bruguera uses art to exemplify new possibilities by living them out in real time and inviting us along. New realities aren’t utopic; they are accessible, and we are empowered to want them, explore them, and—even if for only for one minute on a stage in Havana, or a brief ballot drop in a gallery—to live them. Even when power, through the form of government, racial oppression, or anti-immigration policies, tries to stop us.

Bruguera is unwavering in her refusal to accept the status quo. Rather than dictate a solution, her projects prompt empowered responses through engagement. She repeatedly asks us to never stop asking questions about power. Who benefits? Whose voices are left out? Who is trampled underfoot? What other ways of living can we imagine? Art is essential to change-making, but only when it encourages daily, incessant questioning. If there is one take-away from Bruguera’s mission behind her art, it is: Never stop talking to power.

[1] The clip is from Bay Area filmmaker Lynn Hershmann Leeson’s documentary Tania Libre, which premiered at YBCA in June 2017.

Tania Bruguera, Escuela de Arte Útil, 2017–ongoing. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

Antes de entrar en el edificio del Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA), Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder se me presentó en forma de un atrevido espectacular anaranjado. Situado en un patio exterior frente a una concurrida intersección del centro de San Francisco, el espectacular en aquel momento declaraba de forma directa: “No hay ambigüedad. Termina con la supremacía blanca ahora,” presentado días después de que el Presidente Trump despectivamente equiparara las acciones violentas de los supremacistas blancos a sus contra-manifestantes en Charlottesville, VA. Más tarde aprendí que las palabras del espectacular venían del personal de YBCA en lugar de la propia artista. Sin embargo, el espectacular es parte de sus proyectos donde la capacidad de respuesta a los acontecimientos actuales cae en consonancia con el objetivo de Bruguera de activar la política regional específica en la cotidianidad a través de sus exposiciones y práctica artística. Para Bruguera, esto no es “sólo arte”, y nunca estamos “sólo” en una galería de arte.

Al rodear la esquina, el arte de Bruguera me enfrentó de nuevo. Esta vez, en sus propias palabras a través de una cartelera electrónica que marcaba votos a favor y en contra de la provocación: “Las fronteras matan. ¿Deben abolirse las fronteras?” Miré los ochocientos y tanto “sí” y los poco más de trescientos “no” sintiendo el peso de una diferente y simple, pero fuerte declaración.

Cuando entré en la exposición, su obra otra vez me atrapó indefensa, pero esta vez con una criatura de aspecto antiguo. En el centro de la habitación había una formidable figura de tamaño real cubierta en espeso lodo. Con clavos sobresaliendo por todo su cuerpo, la figura era amenazadora. Solamente las delgadas y pálidas manos de plástico fueron descubiertas para revelar el maniquí que se encontraba debajo. Una proyección de video mostraba un performance en el que esta criatura “cobraba vida”, con un humano debajo del barro apelmazado, y salía de una galería, hacia las calles.

Inspirado por la figura de poder nkisi nkondi de los Kongos (de la República Democrática del Congo), Destierro (Desplazamiento, 1998-99) representa el espíritu del pueblo cubano que despierta para hacer el bien bajo la promesa de la revolución que aún no ha sucedido; incluso sin este contexto cultural específico, la obra me perseguía como un símbolo de una conciencia popular, una traición política, y una construcción hambrienta de cambio. Estos son un conjunto apropiado de temas para introducir la carrera de treinta años de Bruguera.

Tania Bruguera, Referendum, 2015–16. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

La exposición es la primera revisión de los proyectos a largo plazo de Bruguera, en la cual los curadores incluyeron mucho contexto para ayudar a los espectadores estadounidenses (quienes pueden estar menos familiarizados con Bruguera) a entender los métodos específicos de la artista. Aunque no se trate de un nombre conocido por cualquier medio, su notoriedad como una artista que ha sido arrestada y detenida múltiples veces por el gobierno cubano en los últimos años ha recibido la atención de medios dominantes. A diferencia de otros artistas contemporáneos que han provocado titulares de noticias, Bruguera es indiferente al valor del choque – aunque esta declaración pudiera ser difícil de aceptar en cuanto a una artista que más de una vez jugó ruleta rusa suicida mientras leía su manifiesto acerca de la creación artística que fomente el compromiso social. Autosabotaje (2009) parece no ser típica a la práctica de Bruguera, al menos dentro de esta exposición. Lo que realmente transmite esta obra en los otros trabajos es la constante confianza de la artista mientras tranquilamente interrumpe normas sociales establecidas.

Tania Bruguera, Tatlin’s Whisper #6 (Havana Version), 2009. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

En contraste con ese trabajo, la mayoría de los proyectos de Bruguera son performativos y participativos. Están organizados en una forma que integra perfectamente las acciones de la obra de arte en la vida real, teñidos con un optimismo imaginativo, filosófico y socialmente sensible. Por ejemplo, el conteo para la cartelera electrónica fuera del edificio proviene de una votación dentro de la galería a partir de la obra Referéndum (2015-16).  Un tema recurrente en California es el traicionero, árido y fuertemente vigilado territorio entre Estados Unidos y México, con la insistencia de Trump en la construcción de un muro fronterizo y el reciente perdón del brutal Sheriff Joe Arpaio. Al dejar caer mi voto dentro de la urna de votación, me preguntaba cuánto importaba mi participación. Parecía casi como un juego. Yo sería otro voto por abolir las fronteras, sí, pero ¿qué pasa más allá del alcance de la galería? Días más tarde, me doy cuenta de que ese puede ser exactamente el punto: provocar a los espectadores como yo a hacernos la misma pregunta.

Otra obra confía fuertemente en la participación y eleva las apuestas aún más alto. El performance de 2009, Tatlin’s Whisper #6 (Havana Version), dio literalmente una plataforma a los cubanos para hablar libremente por un minuto. El escenario y el podio, respaldado por una exuberante cortina de oro, fueron reinstalados en la galería del YBCA; la grabación del performance sólo se puede ver al subir a las pantallas de dos cámaras de vídeo en su tripié. La importancia de esta obra de arte, de esta acción, en Cuba está subrayada por la supresión del gobierno de la petición de Bruguera de recrear la obra en 2014. Este trabajo es parte de su compromiso con el arte útil. En un videoclip [1] Bruguera dijo, “Espero [que] un día la libertad de expresión en Cuba no tenga que ser un performance”. Este encuadre me ayuda a entender las obras que convergen en la simplicidad del juego. Es esta esperanza que impulsa el cuestionamiento de Bruguera a las audiencias y a los gobiernos – a todos los humanos.

Tania Bruguera, Immigrant Movement International, 2010–ongoing. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

Como otro aspecto de esta compleja y minuciosa exposición, Bruguera activó Escuela de Art Útil (2017 – en curso) invitando a los estudiantes locales de arte a participar en cursos especiales. Aunque la documentación de las clases permanece en la galería bajo la forma de notas y secuencias de video, el espacio archivado dejó poco para que otros espectadores exploraran, una sensación de que el momento había pasado. En cambio, una galería casi vacía absorbió mi atención. Llevado a cabo dentro de una amplia habitación cubierta con banners, Movimiento Migrante Internacional (2010 – en curso) es un proyecto flexible que se centra en los derechos de los inmigrantes globales. Un manifiesto impreso en las paredes tanto en español como en inglés (y disponible en impresos en otros idiomas) sostuvo mi mirada mientras me sentaba en una banca circular. Aunque yo era la única visitante en ese momento, la arquitectura claramente sugería un espacio de reunión.

Durante la exposición esta galería en específico está dedicada al libre acceso como espacio de reunión para las organizaciones regionales locales que trabajan en pro de los derechos de los inmigrantes. Este nuevo proyecto, Party of Migrant People’s Assembly (2017) fue creado para el YBCA. No, corrijo: el proyecto fue creado para la gente, y está dentro del YBCA.

Para mí es un recordatorio que para Bruguera, y para nosotros si lo elegimos, una galería es más que una sala de arte. Activar un espacio, votar “sin consecuencias”, y una plataforma activada para la libertad de expresión son obras de arte, y son más que arte. Con los proyectos de Bruguera, podemos probar nuevas realidades e intentar objetivos aparentemente inviables. Pero, ¿qué es lo que realmente hace?

Tania Bruguera, Self-sabotage, 2009. Installation view, Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 2017. Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Photographs by Charlie Villyard.

Bruguera nos incita a recordar que siempre estamos en el mundo, y por ende siempre estamos comprometidos con el poder, y el arte es sólo una manera de manifestar ideas que pueden conducir a nuevas formas de ser y de vivir. Desde sus primeras obras como Destierro o Autosabotaje hasta su siempre cambiante Escuela de Arte Útil e Immigrant Movement International, Bruguera utiliza el arte para ejemplificar nuevas posibilidades al desplegarlas en tiempo real y nos invita a unirnos. Las nuevas realidades no son utópicas; son accesibles, y estamos facultados para desearlas, explorarlas, y — aunque sólo sea por un minuto en un escenario en la Habana, o un breve descenso de votos en una galería — para vivirlas. Incluso cuando el poder, mediante la forma de gobierno, la opresión racial o las políticas contra la inmigración, trata de detenernos.

Bruguera es inquebrantable en su negativa a aceptar el status quo. En lugar de dictar una solución, sus proyectos dan pie a respuestas empoderadas a través del compromiso. Ella nos pide repetidamente que nunca dejemos de hacer preguntas sobre el poder. ¿Quién se beneficia? ¿Qué voces quedan fuera? ¿Quién es pisoteado? ¿Qué otras formas de vivir podemos imaginar? El arte es esencial para constituir cambios, pero sólo cuando se alienta el cuestionamiento incesante día a día. Si hay un aporte de la misión de Bruguera detrás de su arte, es: Nunca deje de hablar con el poder.

[1] El video es del documental de Lynn Hershmann Leeson Tania Libre, el cual se estrenó en YBCA en junio de 2017.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

MARGINALIA #21

Looking Forward Looking Back

For Sale Detroit

Express Takeover of Santa Fe Mall in Mexico City ends with casualties