Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas
Wide Open

Wide Open

Marcos Agudelo, Ursula Biemann, More&More Unlimited, and more

The Pollock Gallery Dallas, Texas, USA 11/03/2017 – 12/02/2017

Port to Port and The Pollock Gallery present Wide Open, a research exhibition exploring modern global infrastructures that shape our contemporary geological and material landscape, consisting of works by Marcos Agudelo, Ursula Biemann, More&More Unlimited (an Illogistics Company™) (Marina Zurkow, Sarah Rothberg, and Surya Mattu), Rebecca Moss, Armin Mühsam, Liam Young, and Tamir Zadok. The

DeGolyer Library, SMU, Edward C., Fritz Papers, Our Taxes, Their Barge Canal, Flyer, 1973. Courtesy of Pollock Gallery Exhibition view, Wide Open, 2017. Courtesy Pollock Gallery, Dallas Exhibition view, Wide Open, 2017. Courtesy Pollock Gallery, Dallas Port to Port and The Pollock Gallery present Wide Open, a research exhibition exploring modern global infrastructures that shape

Campions

Campions

Curated by Debra Barrera

Jonathan Hopson Gallery Houston, Texas, USA 09/10/2017 – 10/15/2017

Jonathan Hopson is pleased to present Campions, a group show curated by Debra Barrera featuring work by six artist who . While diverse in their style, the works by Brittney Anele, Linda Arredondo, Steven Evans, Jamil Hellu, Liz Rodda, and Talia Shulze. The American ideology of difference has shifted. A recent change has emerged for acceptance of the marginalized

Talia Shulze, rose+lily, 2017. C print, framed. 16 x 20”. Image courtesy of Jonathan Hopson. Installation view. Campions at Jonathan Hopson, 2017. Image courtesy of Jonathan Hopson. Installation view: Brittney Anele, Chained Jumper, 2017. Handmade garment. 57 x 32 x 1″. Image courtesy of Jonathan Hopson Jonathan Hopson is pleased to present Campions, a group show curated by Debra Barrera featuring

Tierra. Sangre. Oro. Tierra. Sangre. Oro.

Tierra. Sangre. Oro.

A project by Rafa Esparza

Ballroom Marfa Marfa, Texas, USA 08/25/2017 – 03/18/2018

Tierra. Sangre. Oro. is a group exhibition envisioned by Rafa Esparza that includes new work by Carmen Argote, Beatriz Cortez, Esparza, Timo Fahler, Eamon Ore-Giron; new and existing photographs by Star Montana; a major body of work by Nao Bustamante; the contributions of adoberos/artists Sandro Cánovas, Maria Garcia, Ruben Rodriguez, as well as many hands from the community

Installation view: (on top) Eamon Ore-Giron, Talking Shit With Quetzalcoatl/ I Like Mexico and Mexico Likes Me, 2017. Wool, copper, adobe. Courtesy the artist; (on the bottom) Rafa Esparza, Raised Adobe Ground for Talking Shit With Quetzalcoatl, 2017. Adobe. Courtesy the artist. Image courtesy of Ballroom Marfa. Carmen Argote, Hunting and Gathering, 2017. Acrylic on muslin fabric, cardboard

Coyote Coyote

Coyote

Curated by Jonathan Hopson

Jonathan Hopson Houston, Texas, USA 06/18/2017 – 07/30/2017

Jonathan Hopson presents Coyote, a summer group show curated by Jonathan Hopson uniting six artists who, all living or born in Texas, imbue their work with the spirit of this state: a strange breed of vicious independence and quiet perseverance. While diverse in their styles, the works by Debra Barrera, Julie DeVries, Lauren Moya Ford, Erin Joyce, Bradley Kerl, and

Installation view. Courtesy of Jonathan Hopson, Houston. Installation view. Courtesy of Jonathan Hopson, Houston. Debra Barrera, Blanquita, 2017. Antique ceramic hand vase, silver thread, coyote fangs. 11 x 4 x 2”. Courtesy of Moody Gallery Jonathan Hopson presents Coyote, a summer group show curated by Jonathan Hopson uniting six artists who, all living or born in Texas, imbue their

Bara, Bara, Bara

Bara, Bara, Bara

Pia Camil

Dallas Contemporary Dallas, Texas, USA 04/08/2017 – 08/20/2017

Through a wide variety of media ranging from installation to performance and ceramics, Pia Camil explores themes of art history, consumerism and the Mexican urban landscape. Investigating urban ruin through interpretations of abandoned billboards, dollar stores, and iconic works of art, Camil addresses the aesthetic language of modernism and its relationship to retail and advertising.

Pia Camil. Bara, Bara, Bara. Installation view at Dallas Contemporary, 2017. Photo: Kevin Todora. Courtesy of Dallas Contemporary Pia Camil. Bara, Bara, Bara. Installation view at Dallas Contemporary, 2017. Photo: Kevin Todora. Courtesy of Dallas Contemporary Pia Camil. Bara, Bara, Bara. Installation view at Dallas Contemporary, 2017. Photo: Kevin Todora. Courtesy of Dallas Contemporary Through a wide variety

Bajo el volcán Bajo el volcán

Bajo el volcán

Gwladys Alonzo

guerrero-projects Houston, Texas, USA 06/02/2017 – 06/03/2017

To illustrate the narrative, Gwladys Alonzo projects the viewer to the heart of a drunkenness in Mexico. The structure of the exhibition unites recollections of the past like long immersions in the Mexican countryside, the work reminiscent of her voyages by train from Monterrey to Los Mochis, to those months spent in Oaxaca on the

Hueco no 1, 2017. Mirror, construction sand, concrete, spray paint. 65 cm x 30 cm. Courtesy of the artist. Installation view. Gwladys Alonzo, Bajo el volcán. guerrero-projects, 2017. Courtesy of the artist. Installation view. Gwladys Alonzo, Bajo el volcán. guerrero-projects, 2017. Courtesy of the artist. To illustrate the narrative, Gwladys Alonzo projects the viewer to

Unexpected Unexpected

Unexpected

Curated by Joan Davidow

SITE131 Dallas, Texas, USA 04/01/2017 – 05/27/2017

SITE131 opened its spring exhibition Unexpected. Curated by founder | director Joan Davidow, Unexpected gathers talents from Texas, the greater United States, and abroad whose work will surprise and delight you: Jaime Tarazona from Bogotá, Colombia; Nina Katchadourian from New York; and Cameron Schoepp from Texas. http://site131.com/

Installation view. Unexpected, 2017. At SITE131, Dallas. Courtesy of the artists and SITE131 Installation view. Unexpected, 2017. At SITE131, Dallas. Courtesy of the artists and SITE131 Installation view. Unexpected, 2017. At SITE131, Dallas. Courtesy of the artists and SITE131 SITE131 opened its spring exhibition Unexpected. Curated by founder | director Joan Davidow, Unexpected gathers talents from Texas, the

Adiós Utopia: Dreams and Deceptions in Cuban Art Since 1950 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Adiós Utopia: Dreams and Deceptions in Cuban Art Since 1950 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Adiós Utopia: Dreams and Deceptions in Cuban Art Since 1950 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

By Patricia Restrepo Houston, Texas, USA 03/05/2017 – 05/21/2017

The debut presentation of Adiós Utopia: Dreams and Deceptions in Cuban Art Since 1950 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) is the most comprehensive and (self-declared) significant presentation of modern and contemporary Cuban art shown in the United States since 1944, when Modern Cuban Painters was mounted at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Muro de pósters cubanos a la entrada de la exhibición. Cortesía CIFO y Ella Fontanals-Cisneros La presentación de Adiós Utopia: Dreams and Deceptions in Cuban Art Since 1950 en el Museo de Bellas Artes de Houston (MFAH) es la más completa y (autodeclarada) significativa presentación de arte cubano contemporáneo y moderno exhibida en los Estados

Menina

Menina

Debra Barrera

Moody Gallery Houston, Texas, USA 04/08/2017 – 05/13/2017

Menina is a collection of works inspired by two rooms in my childhood home: the formal living and dining room. These rooms were decorated by my mother and filled with opulence and ornamentation; paintings of faux Dutch still life, gold tassels hanging from lamp shades, and pistachio green velvet pillows. Rarely used, the rooms became

Mariah and Marie Laurencin, 2017. Archival print on granite. 7 x 4″. Courtesy of the artist. Installation view. Courtesy of the artist. Versailles, 2017. After Alexandre Benois’ painting The King Walked in Any Weather, from the series The Last Walks of King Louis XIV, 1898. Graphite on paper, velvet. 25″ x 30″. Courtesy of the

White Lies

White Lies

Lucas Simões

Lora Reynolds Gallery Austin, Texas, USA 04/08/2017 – 05/27/2017

Lucas Simões’s Abismo sculptures, whether freestanding or hanging on the wall, combine geometric shapes cast in concrete, stacks of tracing paper, and sometimes thin sheets of wood, copper, or brass. Simões precisely aligns hundreds of sheets of paper and pinches them between or drapes them over concrete forms without internal supports or glue —only gravity

Lucas Simões, White Lies 7, 2017. Concrete, paper, gold leaf, and steel. 57 x 13-1/4 x 10-3/4 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Installation view. Courtesy of the artist. Installation view. Courtesy of the artist. Lucas Simões’s Abismo sculptures, whether freestanding or hanging on the wall, combine geometric shapes cast in concrete, stacks of tracing paper,