Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas
Porto Alegre Round-Up: 11th Mercosul Biennial and Exhibitions at the Iberê Camargo Foundation, Brazil Porto Alegre Round-Up: 11th Mercosul Biennial and Exhibitions at the Iberê Camargo Foundation, Brazil

Porto Alegre Round-Up: 11th Mercosul Biennial and Exhibitions at the Iberê Camargo Foundation, Brazil

by Rosa Lleó Porto Alegre, Brazil 04/06/2018 – 06/03/2018

Porto Alegre is not a tourist destination. It is a medium-sized South-American town, with a colonial center and tall, austere modernist buildings. The city is in Brazil, but could as well be in Uruguay or Argentina. The creation of the Mercosul Biennial and the Iberê Camargo Foundation in 1996 and 1995, respectively, gave the city and the larger

Vista de instalación, Mary Evans en Bienal Mercosul. Foto: Ding Musa. Imagen cortesía de Bienal Mercosul Porto Alegre no es una ciudad turística, es una urbe mediana de Sudamérica con su centro colonial y edificios altos de un modernismo austero. Forma parte de Brasil, pero también podría formar parte de Uruguay o Argentina. Debido a la creación de

We live in the best city of South America We live in the best city of South America

We live in the best city of South America

Curated by Bernardo José de Souza and Victor Gorgulho

Fundação Iberê Camargo Porto Alegre, Brazil 09/30/2017 – 02/04/2018

Possibly the most explosive of movements in Brazilian culture, Tropicalism is now five decades old since its first signs of life in 1967. The much talked about anniversary of the movement, however, imposes the urgency of a critical revision that surpasses any other fleeting impulse for mere celebrations. Half a century after its release, the

Carlos Vergara, Poder, da série Carnaval, 1972. Print. Courtesy of the artist Traplev, Sganzerla sampler, 2016. Hand painting on plastic canvas. Courtesy of the artist Maria Sábato, Lava-Jato – Lavagem integral, 2016. Courtesy of the artist Possibly the most explosive of movements in Brazilian culture, Tropicalism is now five decades old since its first signs