Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

SITElines 2016

By Natalia Valencia New Mexico, USA 07/01/2016 – 01/31/2017
Paolo Soleri_box24f03i03

Paolo Soleri’s Amphiteater, ca. 1975.

MUCH WIDER THAN A LINE

SITELINES SANTA FE 2016

Curated by Rocío Aranda-Alvarado, Kathleen Ash-Milby, Pip Day, Pablo León de la Barra and Kiki Mazzucchelli

“Brighter than several suns at midday” was how Manhattan Project nuclear program director General Leslie Groves described the impact of the first controlled nuclear test in history, 1945’s “Operation Trinity,” which the US government conducted in secret at Alamogordo, New Mexico. At the time, the area was inhabited by nineteen Pueblo, two Apache and part of a Navajo nation.(1) The historical episode—that certain scientists consider the beginning of the Anthropocene(2)—is referred to in the curatorial research supporting the SITElines Santa Fe 2016 Biennial. Beyond the geological nomenclature—the scientific community has yet to agree entirely with regard to its beginning—Groves’s description interests me because of its (unintentional) poetic potential.

In concrete terms, those concentrated suns that exploded over Alamogordo more than seventy years ago produced radiation that to this day affects the health of the area’s original, indigenous people. Often they lack the means to acquire needed treatment in the United States healthcare system(3) Updated historical accounts about the Trinity Project on the US Department of Energy website state the location was chosen for “its remoteness.”(4) It brings to mind Naomi Klein and her conference “Let Them Drown: The Violence of Othering in a Warming World,” presented in 2016 on the anniversary of Edward Said’s death. In it, she describes the recognition of the life of the Other—the non-white and non-Western—as less important, as well as the long-standing Western custom of using the Other as guinea pigs.(5)

So what on the symbolic plane might evoke that figure of several suns’ force, all shining at the same time? If language is the vehicle through which science is crossed, and mixed, with poetry, how can we use language to negotiate our relationship with the land, the non-human and the inhuman?

SITElines Santa Fe 2016 emphasizes the importance of non-Western knowledge in the Americas (assuming the heterogeneity that such a focus implies) and therefore opens up perspectives to other ways of naming the world. In her text for the biennial’s catalogue, co-curator Pip Day suggests that when the Inuit say the earth is wobbling, their use of language is not metaphorical. On the other hand, and indeed metaphorically, what ought to wobble and spin on its axis is Western understanding of other cultural interpretations of ecological phenomena, in order to preserve life on Earth. SITElines organization Managing Curator (who is not curator of this latest biennial) Candice Hopkins, a member of the indigenous Carcross/Tagish nation, from the Canadian Yukon, opened the event with a specific protocol: thanking above all the Native custodians of the lands that surrounded us there, the ancestors; then she called out each participating artist by name.

ZachariasKunukKey-Still-2

Zacharias Kunuk, Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner, film, 2001.

As we made our way around the biennial, we did indeed discover diverse, wide-ranging contemporary production on the part of artists from all over the Americas, several of whom identify as indigenous or of indigenous ancestry. They ranged from Inuit director Zacharias Kunuk’s magnificent film Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner (2001)—which portrays the Arctic’s traditional ways of life and cosmogonies—to Maria Hupfield’s performance-based research on the vernacular materials and forms with which the body adapts to the environment, in It Is Never Just About Sustenance or Pleasure (2016); Raven Chacón’s poetic educational project, undertaken with the Native-American Composers Apprenticeship Project in Arizona, in which the sound artist teaches young Native-American composers to unlearn the string quartet’s possibilities; or Abel Rodríguez, a Nonuya and Muinane indigenous “plant connoisseur” born in the Colombian Amazon’s La Chorrera, whose drawings recreate seasonal cycles in his native land’s topographies, a reflection of his ancestral land-stewardship knowledge.

Abel RodriguezSalon Nacional_4c

Abel Rodriguez, The Cycle of the Maloca Plants, 2009, ink on paper.

Hupfield_SITE_Image4

Maria Hupfield, It Is Never Just About Sustenance or Pleasure, performance-based film, 2016.

Mixed in with those pieces we happened on historical figures whose prolific work still offers true archival gems to curators, as is the case with Marta Minujin, David Lamelas, Cildo Meireles, Lina Bo Bardi, Graciela Iturbide, Miguel Gandert, Pierre Verger and particularly Margaret Randall, with her fantastic documentation of the independent publication El Corno Emplumado, which she edited in Mexico alongside Sergio Mondragón in the 1960s.

17cover

Margaret Randall & Sergio Mondragón, El corno emplumado, publication, 1960s.

PierreVerger59842 CB CB

Pierre Verger, Candomblé Opo Afonja, Salvador, Brazil, 1950, gelatin silver print.

How, therefore, do all these pieces dialogue? If what divides or connects them is much wider than a line, then it may be worthwhile to consider which works all but exclusively belong to the contemporary art realm and which more widely speak of culture.

Iturbide_SelfPortraitWithTheSeri127_1979

Graciela Iturbide, Self Portrait With The Seri, photograph, 1979.

It’s also important to consider that tiresome but recurring question: who speaks for the Other, and from what place? On display are impressive photographs of entranced Candomblé practitioners from 1950s-era Brazil by the French photographer and self-taught ethnographer Pierre Verger. Also present are Graciela Iturbide’s iconic photos of the indigenous Seri people of Sonora that Mexico’s Instituto Nacional Indigenista commissioned in the 1970s. In both cases, curators leading gallery visits stressed that both Verger and Iturbide had achieved a degree of integration with their portrayed subjects that positioned them somewhere beyond the simple colonialist figure of the artist as ethnographer (as “evidenced” by a photo portrait of Iturbide’s face painted identically to those of her indigenous companions). This assertion is inherently problematic as it alludes to colonial representation schemes that don’t seem to have been overcome completely.

MartaMinujinSITE-8848

MartaMinujin, Comunicando con Tierra, (1976, 2016), documents, photos, earth construction, video

More significantly, one of the exhibition’s principal unifying themes is the archive of the Paolo Soleri Amphitheater, an experimental architectural project Santa Fe’s Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)—and its visionary founder, Cherokee designer Lloyd Kiva New—commissioned in 1964. The amphitheater mixes regional, vernacular architectural elements with those from classical theatre; it incorporates a biomorphic stage that affords multiple perspectives (as opposed to Western theatre’s sole vantage point) as well as other interesting hybridizations. In their day, these served to complement the equally experimental program of Indian Theater and performing arts that were taught and staged there during the Institute’s “golden era,” a progressive mix of tradition and utopian thinking. Sadly, after the IAIA moved off the Santa Fe Indian School campus, the amphitheater fell into disuse and today stands all but ruined due to prohibitively high maintenance costs. For the installation in the space of the biennial, the curators invited architect Conrad Skinner to show documentation of the history of the amphitheater and indigenous Pueblo artist Eliza Naranjo Morse to create a sculpture in collaboration with her mother –in order to account for two points of view regarding the amphitheater’s symbolism as an arena for discussion. But for some reason, the catalog only documented Skinner’s point of view and Naranjo is virtually eliminated from the publication. In his text, Skinner mentions merely that “New Mexico’s indigenous Pueblos were opposed to the project for twenty years,” yet fails to say why. He then goes on to accuse the campus’s current Native American administrators of refusing to restore the structure. Why is there but one (white man’s) voice recounting this history? The public has no access to written indigenous perspectives on the project nor their evolution over time. The building’s historical importance is perfectly clear and this exercise in visibility attests to impeccable curatorial work, but discussions regarding conservation might better be left as questions rather than passive accusations. What would happen if—instead of clinging to materiality—our Western memory were content to archive memories of the Soleri Amphitheater orally? Would it then cease to be Western?

PaoloSoleriInstallshotSITE-8505

Paolo Soleri installation Shots at SITElines Santa Fe 2016.

In his film To Have Done with the Judgment of God, commissioned by the biennale, Javier Téllez’s use of language is open to interpretive ambiguity, an outcome of his long investigation into the concept of madness in the West. He commissioned a Rarámuri (Tarahumara)-language translation of the French radio-play Pour en finir avec le jugement de Dieu, written by surrealist playwright Antonin Artaud in a French mental institution in 1947 and which was censored as obscenity in its day. Its text speaks of a journey Artaud made through the Sierra Tarahumara a decade earlier as well as his participation in a peyote ceremony. The play is loaded with hallucinatory, visceral figures and observations on religion and the human condition that attest to a collapsed rationality. In conjunction with local station Radio Xetar, Téllez broadcast the recording throughout the Sierra Tarahumara region in December 2015. The film shows the instant the recording was transmitted, in households and other everyday settings; we see indigenous people grinding corn and performing other daily tasks, nonplussed by the delirium that floats out of the radio. Other scenes recreate Artaud’s travels through the Sierra, past the anthropomorphic rocks at Valle de los Monjes, ending up at a real-life peyote ceremony. Téllez here walks on thin ice, as the staging of these situations implies, again, an instrumentalization of the Other and confronting the great problems of the colonial anthropological gaze from the XIX century to this day. However, his excuse to navigate through these sensitive questions is madness itself, which is supposed to neutralize morality in this case. By negating the white spectator who does not speak Rarámuri (there are no subtitles to the translation of Artaud’s text), meaning is somehow suspended for the Western audience in a gesture at once jocular and demented that reconfigures rationality’s limits. How does a mad man name the world? And who are the true crazies?

IMG_3604

Javier Téllez, To Have Done With The Judgment of God, 2016.

 

Notes:

(1)    https://www.osti.gov/opennet/manhattan-project-history/Events/1945/trinity_evaluations.htm. Last consultation 20 July 2016.

(2)    http://news.berkeley.edu/2015/01/16/was-first-nuclear-test-dawn-of-new-human-dominated-epoch-the-anthropocene/

(3)    To learn more about the as-yet unresolved issue of Trinity-Project-victim reparations: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/03/05/guinea-pigs-indigenous-people-suffering-decades-after-new-mexico-h-bomb-testing-153856?page=0%2C0

(4)    https://www.osti.gov/opennet/manhattan-project-history/Events/1945/trinity.htm. Last consultation, 26 July 2016.

(5)    http://www.lrb.co.uk/v38/n11/naomi-klein/let-them-drown

Paolo Soleri_box24f03i03

Anfiteatro de Paolo Soleri, ca. 1975

Mucho más amplio que una línea (much wider than a line)

SITElines Site Santa Fe 2016

Curadores: Rocío Aranda-Alvarado, Kathleen Ash-Milby, Pip Day, Pablo León de la Barra, Kiki Mazzucchelli

“Más luminoso que varios soles al mediodía” es como describió el director del programa nuclear Manhattan Project, el general Leslie Groves, al impacto provocado por la primera prueba nuclear controlada de la historia llamada “Trinity” y llevada a cabo en secreto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos en Alamogordo en Nuevo México en 1945, territorio entonces habitado por 19 tribus indígenas Pueblo, 2 tribus Apache y una parte de la nación Navajo. (1) Este episodio histórico es señalado como referencia en la investigación curatorial detrás de la Bienal SITElines Santa Fe 2016, debido a ser considerado por algunos científicos como el principio de la era del Antropoceno.(2) Mas allá de esta denominación geológica, que aún no encuentra consenso en la comunidad científica, me interesa esta descripción de Groves por su (involuntario) potencial poético.

En términos concretos, estos soles condensados que estallaron sobre Alamogordo hace más de 70 años desataron una radiación que hasta el día de hoy sigue afectando la salud de la población indígena originaria de ese territorio, que muchas veces no posee los medios requeridos por el sistema de salud estadounidense para los tratamientos necesarios.(3) El recuento histórico actualizado sobre la prueba Trinity de la página web del Departamento de Energía de Estados Unidos dice que se escogió esa locación por “su lejanía”.(4) Esto me hace pensar en Naomi Klein y su conferencia “Let them drown: The Violence of Othering in a Warming World”, dada en ocasión del aniversario de la muerte de Edward Said en 2016, en la que Klein describe el reconocimiento de la vida del otro, del no-blanco, no-occidental, como menos importante; la costumbre histórica occidental de utilizar al otro como conejillo de indias.(5)

Ahora, en un plano simbólico, ¿qué podría evocar esa figura de la fuerza de varios soles brillando al mismo tiempo? Si el lenguaje es el vehículo en el que la ciencia se cruza y se confunde con la poesía, ¿cómo utilizar el lenguaje para interpretar nuestra (tan discutida) relación con el territorio, con lo no-humano y lo inhumano?

ZachariasKunukKey-Still-2

Zacharias Kunuk, Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner, film, 2001.

SITElines Santa Fe 2016 hace énfasis en la importancia del conocimiento no-occidental de las Américas (asumiendo la heterogeneidad que este enfoque implica) y por ende abre la mirada a otras maneras de nombrar el mundo. En su texto para el catálogo de la bienal, una de las co-curadoras, Pip Day, sugiere que cuando los Inuits dicen que la tierra está tambaleándose, su uso del lenguaje no es metafórico. Por otro lado y de manera metafórica, lo que debe tambalearse y rotar sobre su eje es el entendimiento occidental de las diversas interpretaciones culturales de los fenómenos ecológicos, para negociar la preservación de la vida en la tierra. La curadora adjunta de la organización SITElines (quien no es curadora de esta edición de la bienal), Candice Hopkins (miembro de la nación indígena Carcross/Tagish de Yukon, Canada), abrió su discurso durante la inauguración del evento haciendo uso de un protocolo  específico: agradeciendo antes que todo a los custodios originales del territorio en el que nos encontrábamos, a los ancestros; luego nombró uno por uno a todos los artistas participantes.

Al recorrer la bienal, nos encontramos efectivamente con una selección amplia y diversa de la producción contemporánea de artistas de las Américas, varios de ellos indígenas o de ascendencia indígena. Desde la magnífica película Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner (2001) del director Inuit, Zacharias Kunuk, un relato sobre la forma de vida tradicional y las cosmogonías del Artico, pasando por la investigación performática de Maria Hupfield sobre los materiales y las formas vernaculares con los que el cuerpo se adapta al ambiente en It Is Never Just about Sustenance or Pleasure (2016), el sorprendente proyecto educativo de Raven Chacón hecho en conjunto con el Native-American Composers Apprenticeship Project en Arizona, en el que el artista sonoro enseña a jóvenes compositores nativos a desaprender las posibilidades de los cuartetos de cuerdas, hasta Abel Rodríguez, indígena “conocedor de plantas” nonuya y muinane originario de La Chorrera, en el Amazonas colombiano, quien recrea en sus dibujos los ciclos estacionales de las diversas topografías de su territorio natal, reflejo de su saber ancestral sobre el manejo del territorio.

Abel RodriguezSalon Nacional_4c

Abel Rodriguez, The Cycle of the Maloca Plants, 2009, tinta sobre papel.

Hupfield_SITE_Image4

Maria Hupfield, It Is Never Just About Sustenance or Pleasure, película/performance, 2016.

 

Entremezcladas con estas obras encontramos figuras históricas cuya extensa producción sigue proveyendo a los curadores de verdaderas joyas de archivo, como es el caso de Marta Minujin, David Lamelas, Cildo Meireles, Lina Bo Bardi, Graciela Iturbide, Miguel Gandert, Pierre Verger y especialmente Margaret Randall y su fantástica documentación de la publicación independiente El Corno Emplumado, que editó en México junto a Sergio Mondragón en los 60s.

17cover

Margaret Randall & Sergio Mondragón, El corno emplumado, publicación, 1960s.

PierreVerger59842 CB CB

Pierre Verger, Candomblé Opo Afonja, Salvador, Brazil, 1950, impresión de gelatina de plata.

Entonces, ¿cómo dialogan todas estas piezas entre sí? Si aquello que las divide o las conecta es mucho más amplio que una línea, tal vez vale la pena pensar en qué producciones pertenecen casi que exclusivamente al mundo del arte contemporáneo y en cuáles hablan, más ampliamente, de la cultura.

Iturbide_SelfPortraitWithTheSeri127_1979

Graciela Iturbide, Self Portrait With The Seri (Autorretrato con los Seri), fotografía, 1979.

También es importante pensar en aquella aburrida pero recurrente pregunta: ¿quién habla por el otro, y desde qué posición? Están las impresionantes imágenes de personas en trance en ceremonias de candomblé en Brasil en los 50s, tomadas por el fotógrafo y etnógrafo auto-didacta francés Pierre Verger. También están las icónicas fotos de los indígenas Seri de la región de Sonora tomadas por Graciela Iturbide en los 70s por encargo del Instituto Nacional Indigenista de México. En ambos casos, los curadores enfatizaron durante la visita guiada que tanto Verger como Iturbide habían alcanzado un grado de integración con los sujetos retratados que los posicionaba más allá de la simple figura colonial del artista como etnógrafo –como prueba, la fotografía de la cara de Iturbide pintada de la misma manera que los indígenas. Esta aseveración es de por sí problemática pues alude a esquemas de representación coloniales que no parecen haber sido superados del todo.

MartaMinujinSITE-8848

Marta Minujin, Comunicando con Tierra, (1976, 2016), documentos, fotos, construcción de tierra, video. SITElines Santa Fe 2016

Más significativamente, un eje de la exposición es el archivo del Paolo Soleri Amphitheater, un proyecto arquitectónico experimental comisionado en 1964 por el IAIA (Institute of American Indian Arts) de Santa Fe y su visionario fundador, el diseñador Lloyd Kiva New (Cherokee). Este anfiteatro mezcla elementos arquitectónicos vernaculares de la región con elementos del teatro clásico, incluye un escenario biomórfico que permite una multitud de perspectivas (en vez de la única perspectiva del teatro occidental) y otras interesantes hibridaciones que en su momento se complementaban con el igualmente experimental currículo del Indian Theater y las artes escénicas que se enseñaron allí en los años dorados del Instituto, en lo que en su época fue una progresiva mezcla de tradición y pensamiento utópico. Sin embargo, tras la mudanza del IAIA del campus, el anfiteatro cayó en desuso y hoy se encuentra casi en ruinas pues sus costos de mantenimiento son demasiado altos para el Santa Fe Indian School. Para la instalación en el espacio de la bienal, los curadores invitaron al arquitecto Conrad Skinner a mostrar documentación de la historia del anfiteatro y a la artista indígena Pueblo Eliza Naranjo Morse a crear una escultura en colaboración con su madre – para así dar cuenta de dos puntos de vista acerca del simbolismo del anfiteatro como arena de discusión. Sin embargo y por alguna razón, en el catálogo solo quedó registrado el punto de vista de Skinner y Naranjo está completamente ausente. En su texto, Skinner solo menciona que “los indígenas Pueblos de Nuevo México se opusieron durante 20 años al proyecto”, sin explicar las razones. Luego procede a acusar a la actual administración indígena del campus por no restaurar a toda costa el edificio. ¿Por qué sólo hay una voz (de un blanco) contando esta historia? El público no tiene acceso a la perspectiva indígena escrita sobre el proyecto y su evolución en el tiempo. La importancia histórica del edificio está perfectamente clara y esta visibilización da cuenta de un trabajo curatorial impecable, pero la discusión sobre su conservación tal vez debe dejarse más como interrogación que como una acusación pasiva hecha por un blanco. ¿Qué pasaría si nuestra memoria occidental se contentara con guardar los recuerdos del anfiteatro Soleri en forma oral, en vez de aferrarse a la materialidad? ¿Dejaría de ser occidental entonces? De nuevo, el poder de la palabra… y del silencio.

PaoloSoleriInstallshotSITE-8505

Paolo Soleri, vista de instalación en SITElines Santa Fe 2016.

 

En su película comisionada por la bienal “To Have Done With The Judgment of God”, Javier Téllez propone un uso de la palabra más abierto a la ambigüedad interpretativa, que proviene de su larga investigación sobre la locura en Occidente. Téllez hizo traducir al lenguaje Rarámuri (Tarahumara) la obra de teatro “Pour en finir avec le jugement de Dieu” escrita para la radio francesa por el dramaturgo surrealista Antonin Artaud en un sanatorio mental en Francia en 1947 y censurada en su época por ser considerada obscena. El texto habla de un viaje hecho una década antes por Artaud a la Sierra Tarahumara y su participación en una ceremonia de peyote. Está cargado de figuras alucinantes y viscerales, anotaciones sobre la religión y la condición humana que dan cuenta de una racionalidad desmoronada. En asociación con la emisora local Radio Xetar, Téllez pasó la grabación por la radio local en la Sierra, en diciembre de 2015. La película muestra el momento en que se transmite la grabación en los hogares y la vida común local; vemos a los indígenas moliendo maíz y en otras tareas cotidianas, impasibles ante el delirio que suena en la radio. Las otras escenas recrean el recorrido de Artaud por la Sierra, por las rocas antropomórficas del Valle de los Monjes, finalizando en una ceremonia real de peyote. Téllez juega con fuego, pues la puesta en escena de estas situaciones incluye, de nuevo, una instrumentalización del otro y enfrentar los grandes problemas de la mirada antropológica colonial desde el s. XIX. Sin embargo, su excusa para navegar estas preguntas sensibles es la locura misma, que en este caso, supuestamente neutraliza la moralidad. Al negar el contenido al espectador que no habla el lenguaje Rarámuri (no hay subtítulos de traducción del texto de Artaud), se suspende el significado para la audiencia occidental, en un gesto entre jocoso y demencial que reconfigura el límite de la racionalidad. ¿Cómo nombra un loco el mundo? ¿Quiénes son los verdaderos locos?

IMG_3604

Javier Téllez, To Have Done With The Judgment of God, 2016.

 

Notas:

(1)    https://www.osti.gov/opennet/manhattan-project-history/Events/1945/trinity_evaluations.htm. Ultima consulta, 20/07/2016.

(2)    http://news.berkeley.edu/2015/01/16/was-first-nuclear-test-dawn-of-new-human-dominated-epoch-the-anthropocene/

(3)   Para saber más sobre la (aún no resuelta) reparación a las víctimas del Trinity Test: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/03/05/guinea-pigs-indigenous-people-suffering-decades-after-new-mexico-h-bomb-testing-153856?page=0%2C0

(4)     https://www.osti.gov/opennet/manhattan-project-history/Events/1945/trinity.htm. Ultima consulta, 26/07/2016

(5)     http://www.lrb.co.uk/v38/n11/naomi-klein/let-them-drown

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Back Pack

Archivo de un cinefotógrafo

Poemas feos para todos

Stone Underground