Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Walid Raad at Museo Jumex and Akram Zaatari at Videobrasil

by Dorothée Dupuis Museo Jumex, Mexico City & Videobrasil, São Paulo
primera

Walid Raad, Walkthrough presentation, Museo Jumex, from October 13, 2016 to January 8, 2017. Courtesy of Museo Jumex. Photo: Abigail Enzaldo.

The art of our time undoubtedly has more political responsibility than ever. Akram Zaatari’s retrospective at Videobrasil in São Paulo and Walid Raad at the Jumex Museum in Mexico City perfectly illustrate this awareness on the part of artists. Using aesthetics as a metaphorical tool to understand society and its political organization, these two artists reflect as much on the forms they shape as on the systems of visibility in which they expose their work and make it exist.

Videobrasil, a promotional structure for video art created in Brazil in 1983, has a long-standing relationship with Akram Zaatari. The festival has shown and awarded many of his videos since the mid 1990s. Zaatari’s films draw on documentary techniques but also experiment with new film forms, sometimes using installation to intensify the relationship with the viewer. The latter is encouraged to use her visual culture as well as imagination to process the scenarios and sequences proposed, subtlety sending her back to her own identity and prejudices. Videobrasil invited Akram Zaatari for a first “retrospective” of the artist in Brazil in its newly inaugurated gallery space and directed the exhibition towards one of the central themes of his work, homosexuality. The love story between men becomes an aesthetic spring in itself, making it possible to envisage reality under another sensible regime.

????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

Akram Zaatari at Festival Videobrasil 1996. Courtesy of Videobrasil.

In Lebanon, homosexuality, although condemned, is relatively more tolerated than in other Arab countries [1] (although Zaatari himself remains silent about his own sexual orientation). Is the homosexual issue in the Middle East anecdotal to other more mediated emergencies, such as the fratricidal wars that have ravaged the region for decades? Recently, many countries where homosexuality continues to be severely repressed, called it a concept “imported” from Western nations to formerly colonized nations. It is also to this growing “racialization” of the world that the exhibition tackles —amoous intrigues directly represent the post-colonial conflict in its setting, dehumanized by politics and the media. In Beirut, exploded views (2014), exploded, various men, workers, refugee-like figures, vagabonds, children and soldiers wander in a half empty construction site, whose lack of progress could be inasmuch due to bankruptcy than a silent civil war. The artist appropriates the cliché of inimity between Arab menand displaces it in the domain of the intimate and the fictional, while the cliché of universal “fraternity” is incarnated in a disturbing eroticism, silent exchanges organizing the economy-like trade of feelings, paroles replaced by the sound of the whatsapp messages entering smartphones. In all videos, women are disturbingly absent. Ethereals in The End of time (2013), provocative and victimized in Red Chewing-Gum (2000), invisible and whinny in Tomorrow everything will be alright (2010): the precarious masculine bodies of Zaatari become a sort of universal allegory for other forbidden/ghost bodies, protagonists of the violence of war, religious prohibitions, insecurity, endemic poverty, criminality, racial hatred, sexism, climate change [2]

exhibitionView_BeirutExplodedViews__AkramZaatari_ft.EvertonBallardin

Exhibition view of the 19th Contemporary Art Festival Sesc_Videobrasil: Akram Zaatari, Beirut Exploded Views, 2014. Photos by Everton Ballardin. Courtesy ©Associação Cultural Videobrasil.

RedChewingGum_AkramZaatari©ft.EvertonBallardin

Exhibition view of the 19th Contemporary Art Festival Sesc_Videobrasil: Akram Zaatari, Red Chewing Gum, 2000. Photos by Everton Ballardin. Courtesy ©Associação Cultural Videobrasil.

The allegory echoes the current reality of São Paulo in a particularly pertinent way, touched by the conservative retreat that has recently stormed the country and given Brazil’s particular situation when it comes to LGBT rights in that context. At the Jumex Museum in Mexico City, the exhibition by Walid Raad also tries to give substance to a reflection on subordinate subjectivity, between “peripheral” countries whose cultures keep seeking a hopeless Occidentalism. The parallel with Mexico at this point is very relevant and gives an additional anchor to the exhibition.

I attended the artist’s performance at Jumex on December 1st: Walid Raad arrives. He wears a cap and speaks a pleasantly international  English. During half an hour, he talks in front of a wall diagram whose different parts are successively highlighted by video-projected additional elements. Raad explains quite a complicated story where art, capital, geopolitics, ethics, religion and race hold great importance. The story involves many named actors of the international art world, among them Mexicans and Middle-Eastern actors, transparently challenging the oligarchies whose interests built the very museum the conference was held within. At the end, the different aspects of the story are anecdotal, as Raad’s main point is to expose the powerful mechanisms of fiction –as present in art– an oeuvre in the geopolitical narratives and conspiracy theories that surround us, pinpointing access to information and its organization as the contemporary keys to power. Raad’s work renders visible the endless conflicts of interests that compose the world, stating the end of a possible Universalist consensus –while being very aware of the remaining pre-dominancy of western interests over others. Americans, Europeans and their allies are still writing the official versions of History. But different story telling can be proposed, suggests Raad. The zeal by which Raad tries to represent, by as many means and points of view possible, the experience of war and its violence on the individual may also come from him actually not living most of the civil war in the eighties, his family having fled  the war  to come live in the USA. Especially the work made through the Atlas Group, a fictional collective rescuing images and testimonies about life during the Lebanese civil war, allows Raad to become a witness of events that he didn’t live. Gathering images of engines of bombed cars after their explosion (My neck is thinner than a hair: Engines, 1996-2001); marking with color dots the impact of bullets on facades of building to identify the nationality of the assailants (Let’s be honest, the weather helped, 1998-2006); pretending to find a forgotten roll of film of 1982 from Raad himself documenting the first invasion of Israel of the West Beirut (We Decided to Let Them Say ‘We Are Convinced’ Twice. It Was More Convincing This Way, 1982-2004)… The archive that we see, by its tangibility and materiality, primes then over experience.

20161024_Jumex_WalidRaad_048

Walid Raad. Installation view. Courtesy: Museo Jumex. Photo: Moritz Bernoully.

The archive is actually at the heart of one common project of Zaatari and Raad, the Arab Image Foundation, whose mission is “to collect, preserve and study photographs from the Middle East, North Africa and the Arab diaspora [3]”. The project detaches itself from authored artistic activity, although its aesthetic dimension can’t be denied, to invest as citizens in the public sphere. The foundation poses the question of the role of the archive within countries that large spans of history have occulted or transformed to suit the interests of some over the others. The combination of artistic and non-profit/militant activity has a tradition in the art world, often allowing artists to play with systems passing from one side to the other. In the case of Raad and Zaatari, the mix makes even more sense given the polemic nature of each of the artists’ practices and, interestingly, their efficient compatibility with the art market and institutional world’s demands. Raad and Zaatari know the corporate and military worlds: Lebanese contemporary reality is molded by these institutions, and the way they play with censorship within the liberal global art system to make the politically-incorrect emerge, moving representations only take advantage of the grits in the system, just as the world elites are doing everyday with law and networks  always on their side. These artists process through camouflage, lie by omission, seduction, and attitude intended as weapons to counter the bad faith of the power in place.

20161024_Jumex_WalidRaad_025

Walid Raad. Installation view. Courtesy: Museo Jumex. Photo: Moritz Bernoully.

The relevance of the shows by these two artists who work on the representation of the Arab world in the current Latin American context can’t be denied. The Mexican and Brazilian public can experience the works in a way that a western audience can’t, because they are countries which have experienced violence and oppression, as well as colonial occupations that have given rise to various treatments of the race. What can art say in these situations? To a certain extent, any art defines its own existence and limits itself by answering to a given context, and war is no exception. The art of Raad and Zaatari may thus allow us in São Paulo and Mexico to see own hidden conflicts with different eyes our  —and possibly find courage to confront them.

Notes:

[1]  http://www.slate.fr/monde/85539/lgbt-exception-liban
[2]  http://www.lifegate.com/people/news/huge-iceberg-larsen-c-antarctica
[3]  http://www.fai.org.lb/Template.aspx?id=1

primera

Walid Raad, presentación Walkthrough, Museo Jumex, del 13 de octubre de 2016 al 8 de enero de 2017. Cortesía del Museo Jumex. Foto: Abigail Enzaldo.

Indudablemente, el arte de nuestro tiempo tiene más responsabilidad política que nunca. La retrospectiva de Akram Zaatari en Videobrasil en São Paulo y la de Walid Raad en el Museo Jumex en la Ciudad de México ilustran perfectamente esta conciencia por parte de los artistas. Usando la estética como una herramienta metafórica para entender la sociedad y su organización política, estos dos artistas reflexionan tanto acerca de las formas que moldean su trabajo así como sobre los sistemas de visibilidad en que éste se expone y existe.

Videobrasil, una estructura promocional de videoarte creada en Brasil en 1983, tiene una larga relación con Akram Zaatari. El festival ha mostrado y galardonado muchos de sus videos desde mediados de los 1990s. Las películas de Zaatari utilizan técnicas documentales, pero también experimentan con nuevos formatos de filmación, en ocasiones usando instalación para intensificar la relación con el espectador. Se promueve esto último para utilizar su cultura visual, así como la imaginación para procesar los escenarios y secuencias propuestos, mandándola sutilmente de vuelta a su propia identidad y prejuicios. Videobrasil invitó a Akram Zaatari para la primera “retrospectiva” del artista en Brasil en su recién inaugurado espacio de galería y dirigió la exhibición hacia uno de los temas centrales de su trabajo, la homosexualidad. La historia de amor entre hombres se vuelve una primavera estética en sí, haciendo posible concebir la realidad bajo otro régimen sensible.

????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

Akram Zaatari en Festival Videobrasil 1996. Cortesía de Videobrasil.

En Líbano, la homosexualidad, aunque condenada, es relativamente más tolerada que en cualquier otro país árabe [1] (aun cuando el mismo Zaatari permanece en silencio acerca de su propia orientación sexual). ¿El acaso el asunto de la homosexualidad en Medio Oriente anecdótico comparado con otras emergencias más mediatizadas, como las guerras fratricidas que han devastado la región por décadas? Recientemente, muchos países donde la homosexualidad continúa siendo reprimida severamente lo llamaron un concepto “importado” de las naciones occidentales a las antiguas colonias. Es también a esta creciente “racialización” del mundo que la exposición responde – intrigas amorosas representan directamente el conflicto postcolonial en su entorno, deshumanizado por la política y los medios. En Beirut, exploded views (2014), explosionados, varios hombres trabajadores, figuras similares a las de refugiados, vagabundos, niños y soldados deambulan en un sitio de construcción medio vacío, cuya falta de progreso podría deberse a la bancarrota de la silenciosa guerra civil. El artista se apropia del cliché de la enemistad entre hombres árabes y lo desplaza hacia el dominio de lo íntimo y lo ficticio, mientras el cliché de “fraternidad” universal se personifica en un erotismo inquietante, intercambios silenciosos organizando el comercio de sentimientos como si se tratara de economía, palabras reemplazadas por el sonido de mensajes de whatsapp llegando a los teléfonos inteligentes. En todos los videos, las mujeres están preocupantemente ausentes. Etéreos en The End of Time, provocativos y victimizados en Red Chewing-Gum, invisibles en Tomorrow everything will be alright; los precarios cuerpos masculinos de Zaatari se vuelven una especie de alegoría universal para otros cuerpos prohibidos / fantasmales, protagonistas de la violencia de la guerra, víctimas de las prohibiciones religiosas, la inseguridad, la pobreza endémica, la criminalidad, el odio racial, el sexismo, el cambio climático [2]

exhibitionView_BeirutExplodedViews__AkramZaatari_ft.EvertonBallardin

Vista de exhibición del 19° Festival de Arte Contemporáneo Sesc_Videobrasil: Akram Zaatari, Beirut Exploded Views, 2014. Fotografías de Everton Ballardin. Cortesía de ©Associação Cultural Videobrasil.

RedChewingGum_AkramZaatari©ft.EvertonBallardin

Vista de exhibición del 19° Festival de Arte Contemporáneo Sesc_Videobrasil: Akram Zaatari, Red Chewing Gum, 2000. Fotografías de Everton Ballardin. Cortesía de ©Associação Cultural Videobrasil.

La alegoría hace eco en la realidad actual de São Paulo de una manera particularmente pertinente, afectada por el retroceso conservador que recientemente ha atormentado al país y dada la situación particular de Brasil cuando se trata de los derechos LGBT en ese contexto. En el Museo Jumex en la Ciudad de México, la exhibición de Walid Raad también intenta dar substancia a una reflexión en subjetividad subordinada, entre países de la “periferia” cuyas culturas continúan buscando un occidentalismo sin esperanzas. El paralelo con México a estas alturas es sumamente relevante y proporciona un ancla adicional a la exposición.

Asistí al performance del artista en Jumex el 1ro de diciembre. Walid Raad llega, viste una gorra y habla un agradable inglés internacional. Durante media hora, habla en frente de un diagrama en el muro cuyas diferentes partes son resaltadas sucesivamente por elementos adicionales proyectados en video. Raad explica una historia un tanto complicada donde el arte, el capital, la geopolítica, la ética, la religión y la raza tienen gran importancia. La historia involucra muchos actores conocidos del mundo internacional del arte, entre ellos mexicanos y actores de Medio Oriente, retando transparentemente las oligarquías cuyos intereses construyen el mismo museo en que tiene lugar la conferencia. Al final, los diferentes aspectos de la historia son anecdóticos, pues el principal objetivo de Raad es exponer los poderosos mecanismos de ficción tal y como están presentes en el arte. Es una obra situada en las narrativas geopolíticas y teorías de conspiración que nos rodean, precisando el acceso a la información y su organización como las claves contemporáneas del poder. El trabajo de Raad hace visibles los interminables conflictos de interés que componen el mundo, declarando el fin de un posible consenso universalista –mientras se es consciente de la predominancia restante de los intereses occidentales sobre otros. Norteamericanos, europeos y sus aliados todavía escriben las versiones dominante de la historia. Pero se puede proponer contar una historia distinta, sugiere Raad. El entusiasmo con que Raad intenta representar, por tantos medios y puntos de vista posibles, la experiencia de la guerra y su violencia en el individuo probablemente venga del hecho de que él no vivió la mayoría de la guerra civil en los ochenta, pues su familia había huido de la guerra para vivir en Estados Unidos. Especialmente el trabajo hecho a través de Atlas Group, un colectivo ficticio, rescatando imágenes y testimonios sobre la vida durante la guerra civil libanesa, le permite a Raad convertirse en testigo de eventos que él no vivió. Recolectando imágenes de motores de coches bomba después de la explosión (My neck is thinner than a hair: Engines, 1996-2001); marcando con puntos de colores el impacto de balas en fachadas de edificios para identificar la nacionalidad de los agresores (Let’s be honest, the weather helped, 1998-2006); pretendiendo encontrar un rollo de película olvidado de 1982 del mismo Raad documentando la primera invasión de Israel en Beirut Oeste (We Decided to Let Them Say ‘We Are Convinced’ Twice. It Was More Convincing This Way, 1982-2004)… El archivo que vemos, por su tangibilidad y materialidad, es mejor entonces que la experiencia.

20161024_Jumex_WalidRaad_048

Walid Raad. Installation view. Courtesy: Museo Jumex. Photo: Moritz Bernoully.

El archivo está, de hecho, en el corazón de un proyecto común de Zaatari y Raad, la Arab Image Foundation, cuya misión es “coleccionar, preservar y estudiar fotografías del Medio Oriente, el norte de África y la diáspora árabe [3]”. El proyecto se desconecta de la actividad artística de autor –aunque su dimensión estética no puede ser negada– para invertir como ciudadanía en la esfera pública. La fundación interroga el rol del archivo en países que largos periodos históricos han oscurecido o transformado para ajustarse a los intereses de unos sobre otros. La combinación de lo artístico y la actividad no lucrativa o militante tiene una tradición en el mundo del arte, permitiendo frecuentemente que los artistas jueguen con los sistemas, pasando de un lado al otro. En el caso de Raad y Zaatari, la mezcla tiene mucho más sentido dada la naturaleza polémica de cada una de sus prácticas e, interesantemente, su eficiente compatibilidad con el mercado del arte y las demandas del mundo institucional. Raad y Zaatari conocen los mundos corporativo y militar: la realidad libanesa contemporánea está moldeada por estas instituciones, y la manera en que juegan con la censura dentro del sistema de arte liberal y global para hacer que lo políticamente incorrecto surja, moviendo representaciones sólo para tomar ventaja de las grietas , tal y como las élites del mundo hacen todos días con la ley y las redes que tienen siempre de su lado. Estos artistas procesan a través de camuflaje, mienten por omisión, seducción, una actitud defensiva para ir en contra de la mala fe del poder dominante.

20161024_Jumex_WalidRaad_025

Walid Raad. Installation view. Courtesy: Museo Jumex. Photo: Moritz Bernoully.

La relevancia de las muestras de estos dos artistas que trabajan en la representación del mundo árabe en el contexto actual de América Latina no se puede negar. El público mexicano y el brasileño pueden vivir las obras de una manera que un público occidental no puede, porque son países que han vivido la violencia y la opresión, así como las ocupaciones coloniales que dieron pie a varios tratamientos de la raza.   ¿Qué puede decir el arte en estas situaciones? Hasta cierto grado, cualquier arte define su propia existencia y se limita contestando a un contexto dado, y la guerra no es la excepción. El arte de Raad y Zaatari puede así permitirnos en São Paulo y en México ver los propios conflictos escondidos desde ojos ajenos –y posiblemente encontrar el valor para confrontarlos.

Notas:

[1]  http://www.slate.fr/monde/85539/lgbt-exception-liban
[2]  http://www.lifegate.com/people/news/huge-iceberg-larsen-c-antarctica
[3]  http://www.fai.org.lb/Template.aspx?id=1

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Little Dog Laughed

Joshing the Watershed

Caída libre

Cromática