Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

PArC & Tijuana 2017, Lima

by Diego Del Valle Ríos Lima, Perú 04/19/2017 – 04/23/2017
PArC_overview

PArC overview, © 2017 Perú Arte Contemporáneo

Terremoto Reports discusses on the spot the dynamics occurring in and around the most important Art Fairs of the Américas. Through interviews with some of its most relevant actors, we seek to make visible the conversations succeeding from within.

Diego Costa Peuser
Director of PArC Lima, Peru
www.parc.com.pe

Terremoto: How does PArC emerge? What has been the impact of PArC on a market like that of Peru?

Diego Costa Peuser: PArC was born five years ago; this is its fifth edition. Peru needed a contemporary art fair. There was Lima Photo, that has 7 years now, and the market was asking for a contemporary art fair to align with the presence of fairs in Latin America. I believe that each country needs a fair as a platform to promote artists and the local artistic movement: hence the theme of PArC. I also have a magazine called Arte al Día, it has 38 years of life. I’ve been living in USA, for 20 years now. I started participating in fairs in 1984 in ARCO with a stand of this magazine, on the other side of the counter (laugh), so I know a fair from the inside. I know the need for a fair in each country, and I know the importance we give, in terms of visibility, to the market and to the local and international artistic production.

T: How would you describe the region in terms of the market and the impact that PARC has had on it?

D.C.P.: It is progressing every time. Peru is in a good moment of its artistic production, has a lot of visibility, many good artists, which are having transcendence outside, at institutional level, at Tate level, at Moma level: there is very good presence. I think the fair has impacted on this at a good time, has concentrated this energy, is leading these artists towards more visibility. When you organize the fair, you work a lot on the content, but also on having international collectors coming to visit everything, to visit Peru as a country.

T: What are the challenges PArC and the art market in the South of the continent face?

D.C.P.: We had two very hard years, we are living through a very hard economy in Latin America. Brazil with its political and corruption problems has sprinkled all the countries; it is a power so it drags us all. The great challenge of PAr is to continue looking for projects that are truly original, making the fair become better and have more content to meet the needs of the Peruvian viewer.

Ana_Tijuana

Ana Luisa Fonseca © PArC 2017

Ana Luisa Fonseca
Directora de Tijuana
www.cargocollective.com/tijuana
https://www.facebook.com/edicoestijuana

Terremoto:  Tell us about Tijuana and its relationship with Lima projects for this edition of PArC.

Ana Luisa Fonseca: Tijuana was inaugurated in 2007 as a project of the gallery Vermelho (Sao Pãulo, Brazil) to be an exhibition space for artist books. Two years later, in 2009, we organized the first edition of Tijuana Fair. At that time Brazil still did not have a scene of independent publishers, but it did of artists who self-published themselves but had no place to show their books. We sensed the responsibility of working both as an exhibition space and as a fair, and dedicate ourselves to the production that remains in the margin, in the “border”. That’s why the name Tijuana.

After seven years since the first edition of Feria Tijuana de Arte Impresa, we had already significantly increased in a number of publishers, space and mobilization of the publishing sector to a national and international level. We then decided to organize editions in other cities in Latin America. Moving the fair and organizing it in other contexts brought us closer to local publishers that would be difficult to contact if we were not there. PArC invited us last year to collaborate, for instance, allows us to now know the independent publishing production of Peru more in depth.

T: From your point of view, what is the importance of integrating the editorial medium – meaning an artist book, object book, comic, magazine, theoretical text, etc. – into an art fair? In other words, what does the editorial medium contribute to the art market?

A.L.F.: The artist book has a spirit of resistance by essence. Since the 60s / 70s, when the first boom of that production existed, the attitude of producing books was always to free itself. That context, obviously, more for political reasons, dictatorships that did not allow the free expression where, therefore, the book became a keeper of secrets, forbidden ideas or portable works, that could be hidden with ease. Today the motives are no longer the same, but the book is still a format to get rid of institutions. Publishers that call themselves “independent” publish what they believe, without waiting for the validation or authorization of a boss or sponsor. An example are the fanzines or projects that can often be done at home. On the other hand, there are few bookstores and specialized distributors such as Terremoto or Motto, few galleries that dedicate themselves to opening an adequate space for exhibition and commercialization of books. What happens then, is that the fairs become very convenient for the artist who wants to sell him/herself, and to continue with the “independent” movement, which I particularly prefer to call “autonomous.” In addition, in the context of the Contemporary Art fairs you have the opportunity to conquer collectors not only of art but also of books, and in this way to add the publishing production to collections that will make them last longer and even include it in exhibitions, in their libraries, etc.

eduardo_brandaoLOW

Eduardo Brandão

Eduardo Brandão
Galeria Vermelho, São Paulo, Brazil
www.galeriavermelho.com.br

Terremoto: Could you talk about Vermelho, his link with Peru, in order to relate the market to his artistic program?

Eduardo Brandão: The gallery is now 14 years old, it has allowed us to move through Latin America. We were always a little isolated, I think because of the language and the geographical characteristics. Having more and more Peruvians, Colombians, Argentinian, Uruguayan mainly in São Paulo, whether it is for business or for the universities, I began to notice that we needed to integrate Latin America to our program, which made a lot of sense. Not to think only in São Paulo, Brazil, but in Latin America. São Paulo is Latin America. I am 59, when I started school at the beginning we spoke French, then it changed to English, today the children have to learn English and Spanish. We did not even think about that before.

To bring from there to here and take it from here to there. Europe does this already constantly, through magazines, the TV, everything. It’s harder here. Museums, curators do the same. The importance of Peru is equal to that of Argentina, Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela. Contemporary art is very different, that’s why it is a force that brings us together, to know each other.

T: Is this your first time participating?

E.B.: No, we’ve been involved since PArC started five years ago. The fair has not changed much but the collectors had. The first year, the international collectors did not know us, and they had a very little desire to enter, to ask. That changed, now people already know who we are, they know us already.

T: What do you think are the challenges of the Latin American art market?

E.B.: Fidelity. I have collectors from here, from Colombia, from Venezuela, from Argentina who are still buying. Whenever we have a new artist they always buy us. They are very faithful. We’ve been coming here for five years; in the case of Bogotá, ten years. I still sell to collectors who buy me every year. In Colombia, there are those who bought me three different stages of the same artist. I bring works so they see that the artist is still producing, so they know what she/he is doing now, even if the market changes. That is the biggest challenge: achieve the loyalty of the Latin American collectors.

carlo_centrodelaimagesLOW

Carlo Trivelli

Carlo Trivelli
Galería el Ojo Ajeno, Lima, Peru
www.galeriaelojoajeno.pe
www.facebook.com/galeriaelojoajeno

Terremoto: How does Galería El Ojo Ajeno begin? What is its relationship with the market, from PArC?

Carlo Trivelli: Centro de imagen (before Centro de la fotografía) is founded in 2000, and they open Galería El Ojo Ajeno to have a space to show photography. Centro de la imagen’s being an art school, it was very important to have a space where artistic photo could be presented that could serve to open up the market; at that time very few galleries exhibited photographers, there were still lags in the discussion about whether photography was art or not, or was the younger sister of painting; and also as a visual training space for the students themselves. In 2010, began Lima Photo, in which Centro de la Imagen is a partner. It is an interesting moment because, although almost all the commercial galleries had a photographer among their represented artists, photography was not selling much. Many of us thought it was crazy, that a photography fair was not going to work. And it worked wonderfully. Sales went very well. In fact, it coincided with a boom in the Peruvian economy in 2010. During the government of Alan García, the last three years, Peru had a growth due to circumstances that had to do with the prices of minerals abroad and the Chinese growth, and we had growth between 8 and 10% per year. It was an economic paradise in many ways. And after three years of fair, the idea of making the contemporary art fair was necessary. The process is usually the reverse, you do a contemporary art fair and then an specialized fair appears. Here it was the other way around.

T: What are the challenges of the Latin American or Peruvian art market?

C.T.: The circuit of contemporary art focuses on the traditional Lima or modern Lima, which is from the center of the city to the south… is a small part of the city of 9 millions inhabitants. Even in that space where some new galleries have arrived due to that economic boom evoked earlier, the galleries still have little presence in the market. Many interior designers are intermediaries who buy directly from the artist’s studio, which undermines the mediator function of the galleries. The other thing is that the art system in Peru is quite weak. You have basically three museums that have collections of contemporary art: MAC, where we are now, MALI, and Museo de Arte de San Marcos. The only space with a policy of acquisitions is MALI, so you have a single voice to establish artistic value… there is practically no art criticism in the medias. Those things that give value to the works and that allow the market to develop are lacking. There is a need to institutionalize. I know that the galleries want to strengthen their association of galleries in order to work in this direction: promoting collecting, trying to make the rules clearer to avoid these double pricing standards… Those are the immediate challenges. On the side of creation, the internationalization of artists, I believe that things are going well, and in that sense the fairs have been very important.

tijuana

View of Tijuana Book Fair 2017, Lima

Liatna Rodríguez López
El Apartamento, La Habana, Cuba
www.artapartamento.com

Terremoto: Introduce us El Apartamento. How is it that it is linked from Havana to the Peruvian market, why PArC?

Liatna Rodríguez López: The gallery is very young, barely two years. It is an independent gallery, it focuses mainly on the work with emerging artists, young artists, although we have some artists already consolidated. But fundamentally we work with artists who stay a bit as siders of what is officially displayed within the most visible spaces of the city.

In Cuba there is a problem with the art market which is that there is no national market. The art in Cuba lives only of a foreign collection, mainly North American, with some influences of Latin America and Europe. As an exhibition space, we’ve been interested in trying to find other niches of market that we can explore and not to live constantly at the expense of a very punctual collection that is the North American. It is what we have been trying to do in this period, for example we tried in Colombia, now in Peru, and so in other spaces.

T: In Peru, what have you found attractive in relation to the market?

L.R.L.: This is our first time here. What I think is that, with two fairs, it is too much supply and very little demand. It is a market of important collectors, collectors recognized in Latin America, but I consider that they are very reduced.

T: What do you think are the challenges the Latin American art market faces?

L.R.L.: It is difficult to answer because contexts vary enormously. Yesterday someone told me that in Argentina there are 50 galleries, and I asked how they survive, because it is a small market. 50 galleries of contemporary art. Right now, to come to the fair, most of the Argentine galleries came with government support. It is more or less the same situation we have in Cuba. This has grown too much and I think it is the same thing that we are suffering now at the fair. I think it’s the same thing that happens now with Basel, which is doing programs like Basel City, trying to find other ways, because I do believe that fairs have reached a limit. I do not know how we are going to continue walking down this dynamic, getting out is no problem.

If other countries in Latin America have reduced markets because of economic problems – class differences, money is concentrated in a very small sector – in Cuba there are none. The conditions are completely different.

Diego del Valle Ríos is Terremoto’s Managing Editor.

PArC_overview

PArC overview, © 2017 Perú Arte Contemporáneo

Terremoto Reports analiza en el momento las dinámicas sucediendo alrededor de las más importantes ferias de arte en las Américas. A través de entrevistas a los agentes que forman parte de las mismas pretendemos extender los diálogos que suceden dentro de las ferias.

Diego Costa Peuser
Director de PArC, Lima, Perú
www.parc.com.pe

Terremoto: ¿Cómo surge PArC? ¿Cuál ha sido el impacto de PARC en un mercado como el de Perú?

Diego Costa Peuser: PArC nace hace cinco años, esta es su quinta edición. Perú necesitaba una feria de arte contemporáneo. Había Lima Photo, que lleva 7 años, y el mercado estaba pidiendo una feria de arte contemporáneo para alinearse con la presencia de ferias en Latinoamérica. Creo que cada país necesita una feria como plataforma para promocionar a los artistas y la movida local artística: de ahí viene el tema de PArC. También tengo una revista que se llama Arte al día, tiene 38 años de vida. Vivo en EE. UU., desde hace 20 años. Empecé a participar en ferias en 1984 en ARCO con un stand de esta revista, del otro lado del mostrador (risa), entonces, conozco una feria desde adentro. Sé la necesidad de una feria en cada país, y sé la importancia que le damos de visibilidad al mercado y a la producción artística local e internacional.

T: ¿Cómo describirías la región en términos del mercado y el impacto que PArC ha tenido en ello?

D.C.P.: Cada vez está avanzando. Perú está en un buen momento de su producción artística, tiene mucha visibilidad, muchos buenos artistas, que van teniendo trascendencia fuera, a nivel institucional, a nivel Tate, a nivel Moma: hay muy buena presencia. Creo que la feria ha impactado en esto a buen momento, ha concentrado esta energía, está llevando a esos artistas a tener más visibilidad. Cuando uno organiza la feria se trabaja mucho en el contenido, pero también en que nos visiten coleccionistas internacionales para que vengan a conocer todo, a Perú como país.

T: ¿Cuáles son los retos a los que se enfrenta PARC y el mercado del arte del sur del continente?

D.C.P.: Tuvimos dos años muy duros, estamos con una economía muy golpeada en Latinoamérica. Brasil con sus problemas políticos y de corrupción ha salpicado a todos los países; es una potencia entonces nos arrastra a todos. El gran desafío de PARC es seguir buscando proyectos que sean realmente originales, haciendo que la feria se vuelva mejor y que tenga más contenido para cubrir las necesidades del espectador peruano.

Ana_Tijuana

Ana Luisa Fonseca © PArC 2017

Ana Luisa Fonseca
Directora de Tijuana
www.cargocollective.com/tijuana
https://www.facebook.com/edicoestijuana

Terremoto: Cuéntanos sobre Tijuana y su relación con los proyectos de Lima para esta edición de PARC.

Ana Luisa Fonseca: Tijuana fue inaugurado en 2007 como un proyecto de Galería Vermelho (Sao Paulo, Brasil) para ser un espacio expositivo de libros de artistas. Dos años después, en 2009, organizamos la primera edición de Feria Tijuana. En aquel momento Brasil aún no tenía una escena de editoriales independientes, pero sí de artistas que se auto-publicaban pero que no tenían donde mostrar sus libros. Percibimos la responsabilidad de trabajar tanto como espacio expositivo y como feria, y dedicarnos a la producción que se queda en el margen, en la “frontera”. Por eso el nombre Tijuana.

Pasados siete años desde la primera edición de Feria Tijuana de Arte Impresa, ya habíamos aumentado bastante en número de editoriales, espacio y movilización de ese sector editorial a un nivel nacional e internacional. Decidimos organizar ediciones en otras ciudades de Latinoamérica. Hemos percibido que mover la feria y organizárla en otros contextos nos acercó a editoriales locales que sería difícil contactar si no estuviésemos ahí. Así PArC nos invitó el año pasado a realizar la feria Tijuana dentro de la feria de arte contemporáneo de Lima, y ese año volvimos para conocer más profundamente la producción editorial independiente de Perú.

T: Desde tu punto de vista, ¿cuál es la importancia de integrar el medio editorial – en su forma de libro de artista, libro objeto, cómic, revista, texto teórico, etc. – a una feria de arte? En otras palabras, ¿qué aporta el medio editorial al mercado del arte?

A.L.F.: El libro de artista tiene un espíritu de resistencia por esencia. Desde los sesenta/setenta, cuando existió el primer boom de esa producción, la actitud de producir libros siempre fue de libertarse. En aquel contexto, obviamente, más por cuestiones políticas, de dictaduras que no permitían la libre expresión donde, por lo tanto, el libro se convertía en un guardador de secretos, de ideas prohibidas u obras portátiles, que podían esconderse con facilidad. Hoy los motivos ya no son los mismos, pero el libro sigue siendo un formato para liberarse de las instituciones. Los editoriales que se dicen “independientes” publican lo que creen, sin esperar por la validación o autorización de un jefe o auspiciador. Un ejemplo son los fanzines o proyectos que muchas veces pueden ser hechos de forma casera. Por otro lado, son pocas librerías y distribuidores especializados como Terremoto o Motto, pocas galerías que se dediquen a abrir un espacio adecuado para exposición y comercialización de libros. Entonces, lo que pasa, es que las ferias se tornan muy convenientes para el artista que quiere venderse a sí mismo, y seguir con el movimiento “independiente”, que yo particularmente prefiero llamar “autónomo”. Además, en el contexto de las ferias de arte contemporáneo se tiene la oportunidad de conquistar a coleccionistas no sólo de arte sino también de libros, y de esta manera agregar la producción editorial a colecciones que harán la labor de hacerla perdurar por más tiempo e incluso incluirla en exposiciones, en sus bibliotecas, etc.

eduardo_brandaoLOW

Eduardo Brandão

Eduardo Brandão
Galeria Vermelho, São Paulo, Brazil
www.galeriavermelho.com.br

Terremoto: ¿Pudieras hablar de Vermelho, su vínculo con Perú, en cuestión de relacionar el mercado con su programa artístico?

Eduardo Brandão: La galería tiene 14 años ahora, y nos ha permitido movernos por Latinoamérica. Siempre estuvimos un poco aislados, creo yo por la lengua y por las características geográficas. El tener cada vez más peruanos, colombianos, argentinos, uruguayos, principalmente en São Paulo, ya sea por negocios o por las universidades, empecé a ver qué necesitaba integrar a Latinoámerica a nuestro programa, lo cual tenía mucho sentido. No pensar sólo en São Paulo, Brazil, sino en Latinoamérica. São Paulo es Latinoamérica. Yo tengo 59, cuando empecé la escuela al inicio hablábamos francés, después cambió para inglés. Hoy los chicos tienen que aprender inglés e español. Antes ni pensábamos en eso.

Traer de allá para acá y llevar de acá para allá. Europa hace esto ya constantemente, por las revistas, la televisión, todo. Acá es más difícil. Los museos, los curadores hacen lo mismo. La importancia de Perú es igual a la de Argentina, Colombia, México o Venezuela. El arte contemporáneo es muy distinto, por eso es más bien una fuerza para reunirnos, para conocernos.

T: ¿Es la primera vez que participan?

E.B.: No, participamos desde que empezó PARC hace cinco años. La feria no ha cambiado mucho pero sí los coleccionistas. El primer año, los coleccionistas más internacionales, no nos conocían, y tenían muy poco de deseo de entrar, de preguntar. Eso cambió, ahora la gente ya sabe qué somos, ya conoce un tanto.

T: ¿Cuáles crees que son los retos del mercado de arte latinoamericano?

E.B.: Fidelidad. Tengo coleccionistas de acá, de Colombia, de Venezuela, de Argentina que siguen comprando. Siempre que tenemos un artista nuevo, nos compran. Son muy fieles. Llevamos cinco años viniendo acá; en el caso de Bogotá, diez años. A lo largo de ese tiempo he seguido vendiendo a coleccionistas que me compran todos los años. En Colombia, hay quien me ha comprado tres etapas distintas de un mismo artista. Traigo obras para que ellos vean que el artista sigue produciendo, para que conozcan qué está haciendo ahora, aún cuando el mercado cambie. Ese es el mayor reto: lograr la fidelidad de los coleccionistas latinoamericanos.

carlo_centrodelaimagesLOW

Carlo Trivelli

Carlo Trivelli
Galería el Ojo Ajeno, Lima, Perú
www.galeriaelojoajeno.pe
www.facebook.com/galeriaelojoajeno

Terremoto: ¿Cómo empieza Galería el Ojo Ajeno? ¿Cuál es su relación con el mercado a partir de PARC?

Carlo Trivelli: En el 2000 se funda el Centro de la imagen (entonces Centro de la fotografía), como escuela de fotografía , y abren la Galería El Ojo Ajeno, para tener un espacio de difusión. Era muy importante tener un espacio donde se presentará foto artística que pudiera servir para abrir terreno en el mercado, en ese momento muy pocas galerías exhibían fotógrafos, todavía había rezagos en la discusión sobre si la fotografía era arte o no, o era la hermana menor de la pintura; y también como un espacio de formación visual para los propios alumnos.En 2010, se comienza a hacer Lima Photo, en la que el Centro de la imagen es socio. Es un momento interesante porque, si bien casi todas las galerías comerciales tenían un fotógrafo entre sus artistas representados, la fotografía no estaba vendiendo mucho. Muchos pensamos que estaban locos, que una feria de fotografía no iba a funcionar. Y nos callaron la boca a todos porque funcionó de maravilla. Las ventas fueron muy bien. De hecho, coincidía con un momento de auge en la economía peruana en 2010. Durante el gobierno de Alan García, los últimos tres años, el Perú tuvo un crecimiento por circunstancias que tienen que ver con los precios de los minerales en el exterior y el crecimiento chino, y teníamos un crecimiento entre 8 y 10% anual. Era un paraíso económico en muchos sentidos. Y después de tres años de feria, ya se caía de madura la idea de hacer la feria de arte contemporáneo. El proceso suele ser a la inversa, haces una feria de arte contemporáneo y después aparece una feria especializada. Aquí fue al revés.

T: ¿Cuáles son los retos del mercado de arte latinoamericano o peruano?

C.T.: En Perú el circuito de arte contemporáneo se centra en la Lima tradicional o Lima moderna, que es del centro de la ciudad hacia el sur…es una fracción pequeña de la ciudad de 9 millones de habitantes Inclusive, en ese espacio en el que han llegado algunas galerías nuevas los últimos años con el crecimiento económico y la apertura al exterior, las galerías tienen todavía poco peso en el mercado. Muchos diseñadores de interiores o arquitectos son intermediarios que compran directamente del taller del artista, lo cual socava la función mediadora de las galerías. La otra cosa es que el sistema del arte en el Perú es bastante endeble. Tienes básicamente tres museos que tienen colecciones de arte contemporáneo: el MAC, donde estamos ahora, cuya colección es muy pequeña aún; el MALI, y el Museo de Arte de San Marcos. El único espacio con una política de adquisiciones es el MALI, entonces por el momento tienes una sola voz para establecer valor artístico. Así mismo, prácticamente no hay crítica de arte en medios. Aquellas cosas que confieren valor a las obras y que permiten que el mercado se desarrolle están faltando. Hay una necesidad de institucionalizar. Sé que las galerías quieren potenciar su asociación de galerías para poder trabajar en ese sentido: fomento al coleccionismo, tratar que las reglas sean más claras para evitar estos dobles estándares de precios. Esos son los retos inmediatos. Por el lado de la creación, de la internacionalización de los artistas, yo creo que las cosas marchan bien, y en ese sentido las ferias han sido muy importantes.

tijuana

Vista de la feria Tijuana 2017, Lima

Liatna Rodríguez López
El Apartamento, La Habana, Cuba
www.artapartamento.com

Terremoto: ¿Me podrías platicar un poco de galería? ¿Cómo es que desde La Habana se vinculan con el mercado de Perú, por qué PARC?

Liatna Rodríguez López: La galería es muy joven, apenas llevamos dos años. Es una galería independiente, se concentra fundamentalmente en el trabajo con artistas emergentes, artistas jóvenes, aunque tenemos algunos artistas ya consolidados. Pero fundamentalmente trabajamos con artistas que se quedan un poco como siders de lo que se muestra de manera oficial dentro de los espacios más visibles de la ciudad.

En Cuba existe un problema con el mercado del arte que es que no hay mercado nacional. El arte en Cuba vive únicamente de un coleccionismo foráneo, mayormente norteamericano, con algunas influencias de Latinoamérica y Europa. Como espacio nos ha interesado intentar encontrar otros nichos de mercado que podamos explorar y no vivir constantemente a expensas de un coleccionismo muy puntual que es el norteamericano. Es lo que hemos estado tratando de hacer en este periodo, por ejemplo intentamos en Colombia, ahora en Perú, y así en otros espacios.

T: En Perú, ¿qué han encontrado atractivo en relación al mercado ?

L.R.L.: Es la primera vez que participamos aquí. Lo que me parece es que, con dos ferias, es demasiada oferta y muy poca demanda. Es un mercado de importantes coleccionistas, reconocidos en toda Latinoamérica, pero considero que son muy reducidos.

T: ¿Cuáles crees que son los retos a los que se enfrenta el mercado de arte latinoamericano?

L.R.L.: Es difícil contestarte porque los contextos varían enormemente. Ayer alguien me comentaba que en Argentina existen 50 galerías, y yo le preguntaba cómo sobreviven, porque es un mercado pequeño. 50 galerías nada más de arte contemporáneo. Ahora mismo, para venir a la feria, la mayoría de las galerías argentinas vinieron con apoyos del gobierno. Es más o menos la misma situación que tenemos en Cuba. Esto ha crecido demasiado y creo que es lo mismo que estamos sufriendo ahora en la feria. Creo que es lo mismo que pasa ahora con Basel, que está haciendo programas como Basel City, tratando de encontrar otras formas, porque sí considero que las ferias han llegado a un top. No sé bien cómo se va a seguir caminando en esta dinámica, salir no es problema.

Si otros países en Latinoamérica tienen mercados reducidos por problemas económicos – las diferencias de clases, el dinero se concentra en un sector muy pequeño – en Cuba no hay ninguno. Las condiciones son completamente diferentes.

Diego del Valle Ríos es el editor de Terremoto.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Sabotaje

TXT

Différance

Music & Martyrs Vol. 1