Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

MECA 2017, Puerto Rico

By Diego del Valle Ríos San Juan, Puerto Rico 06/01/2017 – 06/04/2017

Tony Rodríguez and Daniel Báez

Tony Rodríguez and Daniel Báez
Directors of MECA, Puerto Rico
http://www.mecaartfair.com/

Terremoto: Could you describe the Caribbean art market and, from that, point to the importance of having an art fair with a regional focus such as MECA? What has led you to launch into such an adventure?

Tony Rodríguez: We definitely have to start with the idea that a healthy market here on the island, as in the entire Caribbean region, is almost non-existent. Although there are many collectors in Puerto Rico their purchase option is rarely local; usually purchases are generated in galleries from abroad. Having said that, and knowing that there is no concept of art fair in the entire Caribbean region, we decided to create MECA, which is that market hope that has been non-existent for almost a decade. The main mission of MECA is to be able to attract not only galleries, but also curators, collectors, and press from abroad that can help move the efforts that arise in the island, mostly from alternative spaces managed by the artists themselves and also from the few commercial galleries that exist with a respectable program and force, so that those initiatives could have an opportunity of sales without having to leave Puerto Rico.

De derecha a izquierda: Mariangel Gonzáles, Hazel Colón, María Del Mar Caragol, Tony Rodríguez y Daniel Báez. Foto por Worldjunkies

T: In your interview with Pedro Veléz for Artspace, you mention that the artistic and cultural sectors of Puerto Rico are characterized by their resilience to the difficult political and economic contexts they face. Could you tell us a little more about the challenges faced from that resilience and give examples that could work to sketch out possible new models of circulation and exchange to approach critically the dynamics of the market?

TR: We must definitely rethink the model of fairs and galleries, as well as the way cultural events are projected in Puerto Rico, the Caribbean or the whole world. This type of activities have a strong economic impact in the area (gastronomy, hotels, transport, etc.), so new financing methods have to exist, either by private banks or by institutions or foundations that can give any type of incentives for this type of activities. Government support is very little or almost inexistent and for an event of international projection as an art fair, where we are receiving relevant names within the art system, it seems to us that the participation of the government is almost minimal. Value must be given to these efforts, we must look at the real impact that we are giving to the local economy (in this case the impact in the area of ​​Santurce) and quantify it to see how these supports can come. It is also necessary to reevaluate this business model, which I believe will gradually become more obsolete and analyze how otherwise these activities can be accessible to the public in general without losing the quality of the work we want to present and the concept of fair that we want to achieve.

We already know the classic history of the artist and the independent initiatives working from the precariousness, creating projects and things with practically nothing. It is necessary to recognize that in this type of projects there is a personal investment that comes from the pocket of each one of the the ones involved. This creates a name that helps to establish in this crazy art world, which as we know is very uphill and in which creating a career implies a lot of sacrifice. MECA is a sacrifice pointing to all those efforts that have been going on specifically in Puerto Rico during the last 7 or 8 years so they can begin to generate market and sales, a kind of reward for all that they have contributed to the cultural sector of the country.

Foto por Worldjunkies

Carla Acevedo-Yates
Curator of MECANISMOS section

Terremoto: Can you talk a bit about your work and curatorial vision for the opening edition of the MECANISMOS section?

Carla Acevedo-Yates: When Tony Rodríguez and Daniel Báez approached me to select the emerging projects for MECA I thought it’d be a great opportunity to reflect on the locality where the fair is taking place and the conditions under which it is managed. MECA is an initiative from a young gallerist and an emerging artist, and my idea was to call and select independent projects and initiatives, self-represented (artist-run alternative spaces, young curators and up-and-coming galleries) so that, in a way, we can reflect the spirit of the fair. As for curatorial vision, I was interested in selecting projects that would address the vernacular culture of the region (the architecture, social rituals, landscape) as much as metaphysical ideas about time, the body and materiality, all inside a Caribbean context.

Foto por Worldjunkies

T: The artistic production gathered in MECANISMOS references aspects of the vernacular Caribbean culture, ideas about coloniality and metaphysical ideas about time, body and materiality. From your curatorial point of view, what particular characteristics do you find in the emerging Caribbean production and how do they differ from the rest of the narratives in the Americas in relation to these thematic axes?

CAY: Although MECANISMOS approaches the Caribbean as a geography and a cultural space, when selecting the projects I did not want to establish very marked differences between this space and the different geographies that composed the Americas. What interested me was to establish relationships and connections between territories. However, I believe that in many of the proposals, artists are retaking aspects of the local, whether through the use of materials, craft techniques or the reformulation of artistic conventions, and translating them into a contemporary visual language, developing ideas about the historical moment in which we live.

Foto por Worldjunkies

T: Which is the role of the curator within the art market from an emerging fair with the characteristics of MECA?

CAY: In my opinion, the curator is an agent of valorization either within an institution or a commercial space, as it creates cultural capital by selecting artists for their projects. In the case of MECA, which is currently the only art fair in Puerto Rico, it is also a catalyst in contributing to the creation of an infrastructure to support local artists and the local art scene in general. The fair is not only a space for the sale of works of art, it is also a space for dialogue between geographies and a meeting space between the different actors of the cultural scene.

Gustavo Arroniz

Gustavo Arroniz
Arroniz Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City
http://arroniz-arte.com/

T: What motivated you to participate in MECA and how does these causes relate to the artists you present on your booth?

Gustavo Arroniz: My interest in participating in MECA comes from a combination of factors. First, it is a very honest and courageous project organized by people like Danny Baez, with whom I have carried a relationship of much dialogue and ideas in common. On the other hand, years ago I participated in the extinct CIRCA fair and I was interested in the area. I think MECA can find an interesting place in the Caribbean scene towards close scenes like those in Mexico, the United States and South America.

The artists I selected, firstly, they respond to a feeling of freshness where the works have a freedom and thought that connects with my idea of ​​the area, however, I am also interested in presenting a new and different perspective. Being a young fair I decided to present two young artists who are beginning to forge an international path: Victoire Barbot, from France who lives in Mexico, and Christian Camacho. They are accompanied by Omar Rodríguez Graham, a more mature painter but still with a fervent desire for pictorial experimentation.

Foto por Worldjunkies

T: What do you think are the challenges of Latin American nowadays?

GA: The Latin American market is in constant struggle with economic and political crises. Puerto Rico is a great example of this situation. However, these crises have prompted artists and exhibition spaces to push even harder. The challenge is to make these efforts stand up to a voracious and changing market, where trends are increasingly inclined to the established. MECA goes against the current and is a beginning of something. I like to participate and support a new project where the possibilities seem few but great.

 

Agustina Ferreyra

Agustina Ferreyra
Agustina Ferreyra, San Juan, Puerto Rico
https://www.agustinaferreyra.com/

T: What motivated you to participate in MECA and how does these causes relate to the artists you present on your booth?

Agustina Ferreyra: I was motivated by the fact that I am in a moment of transition in the gallery, because my space is not going to exist here in Puerto Rico permanently and it seemed to me that the timing between the fair and my last exhibition before leaving to Mexico. It was a good time to participate. Also, I am very friendly with Dany as well as many of the other exhibitors that came. It is definitely a fair that happens at a difficult time, not only globally but locally, so there are many challenges.

In the booth I present Julio Suarez, a Puerto Rican artist with whom I have worked since I opened the gallery and whose work is well known locally, which I found interesting to present at the fair. His work is presented in dialogue with the work of Heather Guertin who is an American painter with whom I also work. It seems to me that they have an interesting formal relation between Heather’s pictorial gestures vs. the geometry and the monochrome of Julio. There is no much more science behind this, it is a very intuitive and subjective pairing. Also, in the gallery I am presenting an exhibition by Julio from which the booth serves as an extension of it complementing each other well.

Foto por Worldjunkies

T: What do you think are the challenges of Latin American nowadays?

AF: The biggest challenge of the Latin American market, in my opinion, is to internationalize the work of artists at an institutional level. As a young gallery, that takes time. Many institutional curators prefer to do exhibitions with established artists, however, little by little museums are opening up to younger artists. And well, besides that, the challenge is also to establish and maintain long-term relationships with collectors who support the emerging galleries.

It could be added that young galleries operate in a system that has not been reviewed for the past 40 or 50 years, is a collapsed system which is designed for another economy. The art  world today is governed by galleries that within that system achieved success and economic stability, but it is not our reality, so we must find ways to modify the art economy, lean over more nomadic and collaborative structures and even reinvent the concept of “art fair”.

Tony Rodríguez and Daniel Báez

Tony Rodríguez and Daniel Báez

Tony Rodríguez y Daniel Báez
Directores de MECA, Puerto Rico
http://www.mecaartfair.com/

Terremoto: ¿Podrían describir el mercado de arte caribeño y a partir de ello apuntar hacia la importancia de contar con una feria de arte con un enfoque regional como lo es MECA? ¿Qué los ha llevado a lanzarse en tal aventura?

Tony Rodríguez: Definitivamente tenemos que comenzar con la idea de que un mercado saludable aquí en la isla como en toda la región del Caribe, es casi inexistente. A pesar de que en Puerto Rico existen muchos coleccionistas la opción de compra pocas veces es local; la compra se genera en galerías del exterior. Dicho esto, y sabiendo que no hay un concepto de feria de arte en toda la región del Caribe, decidimos lanzarnos a crear MECA, misma que es esa esperanza de mercado el cual ha sido inexistente por prácticamente casi una década. La principal misión de MECA es poder atraer no solamente galerías, sino también curadores, coleccionistas, y prensa del exterior que puedan ayudar a mover la rueda de los esfuerzos que surgen en la isla, en su mayoría desde espacios alternativos gestionados por los propios artistas y también desde las pocas galerías comerciales que existen con un programa respetable y de peso, para que dichas iniciativas pudieran tener una oportunidad de venta sin tener que salir de Puerto Rico.

De derecha a izquierda: Mariangel Gonzáles, Hazel Colón, María Del Mar Caragol, Tony Rodríguez y Daniel Báez. Foto por Worldjunkies

T: En su entrevista con Pedro Veléz para Artspace, mencionan que los sectores artísticos y culturales de Puerto Rico se caracterizan por su resiliencia ante los difíciles contextos políticos y económicos que enfrentan. ¿Nos podrían hablar un poco más sobre los retos que enfrentan desde esa resiliencia y dar ejemplos que podrían funcionar para bosquejar posibles nuevos modelos de circulación e intercambio para acercarse críticamente a las dinámicas del mercado?

TR: Definitivamente hay que repensar el modelo tanto de ferias como de galerías, así como de la manera en que se proyectan los eventos culturales tanto en Puerto Rico, como en el Caribe o el mundo entero. Este tipo de actividades tienen un impacto económico fuerte en el área (gastronomía, hoteles, transporte, etc.) por lo que tienen que existir nuevos métodos de financiamiento, ya sea por la banca privada o por instituciones o fundaciones que puedan dar un tipo de incentivo para este tipo de actividades. El apoyo gubernamental es muy poco o casi nulo y para un evento de calibre internacional como una feria de arte, en donde estamos recibiendo nombres relevantes dentro del sistema del arte, nos parece desacertado que la participación del gobierno es casi mínima. Hay que otorgarle valor a estos esfuerzos, hay que buscar cual es el impacto real que nosotros estamos propinando a la economía local (en este caso todo el impacto en el área de Santurce) y cuantificarlo para ver de qué manera pueden venir esos apoyos. Hay que reevaluar ese modelo de negocios, mismo que creo que poco a poco se hace más obsoleto y analizar de qué otra manera estas actividades pueden ser accesibles para el público en general sin perder la calidad de trabajo que uno quiere presentar y el concepto de feria que queremos alcanzar.  

Ya conocemos la historia clásica del artista y las iniciativas independientes trabajando desde la precariedad, creando proyectos y cosas con prácticamente nada. Hay que reconocer que en ese tipo de proyectos hay una inversión personal que sale del bolsillo de cada uno de los involucrados. Eso va creado un nombre que ayuda a establecerse en este mundo loco del arte, el cual sabemos que es muy cuesta arriba y que crear una carrera en el conlleva mucho sacrificio. MECA es un sacrificio apuntando a que todos esos esfuerzo que han estado pasando específicamente en PR durante los últimos 7 u 8 años empiecen a generar mercado y venta, una especie de recompensa por todo lo que han aportado al sector cultural del país.

Foto por Worldjunkies

Carla Acevedo-Yates
Curadora de la sección MECANISMOS

Terremoto: ¿Nos puedes hablar un poco sobre tu trabajo y visión curatorial para esta presentación inaugural de la sección MECANISMOS?

Carla Acevedo-Yates: Cuando Tony Rodríguez y Daniel Báez me hicieron un acercamiento para seleccionar los proyectos emergentes de MECA, pensé que era una excelente oportunidad para reflexionar sobre la localidad en donde se desarrolla la feria y las condiciones en la cual se gestiona. MECA es una iniciativa de un galerista joven y un artista emergente, y mi idea inicial fue convocar y seleccionar proyectos e iniciativas independientes y auto-gestionadas (espacios alternativos gestados por artistas, curadores jóvenes y galerías emergentes) para de cierta manera reflejar el espíritu emprendedor de la feria. En términos de visión curatorial, me interesaba seleccionar proyectos que abordaran la cultura vernácula de la región (arquitectura, rituales sociales, el paisaje) al igual que temas e ideas metafísicas sobre el tiempo, el cuerpo y la materialidad, todo dentro de un contexto caribeño.

Foto por Worldjunkies

T: La producción artística reunida en MECANISMOS referencia aspectos de la cultura caribeña vernácula, ideas sobre colonialidad e ideas metafísicas sobre el tiempo, el cuerpo y la materialidad. Desde tu punto de vista curatorial, ¿que características particulares encuentras en la producción emergente del Caribe y cómo se diferencian del resto de las narrativas en las Américas en relación a esos ejes temáticos?

CAY: Aunque MECANISMOS aborda el Caribe como una geografía y un espacio cultural, al momento de seleccionar los proyectos no me interesaba establecer diferencias muy marcadas entre este espacio y las diferentes geografías que componen las Américas. Lo que me interesa es establecer relaciones y conexiones entre los territorios. Sin embargo, creo que en muchas de las propuestas, los artistas están retomando aspectos de lo local, ya sea a través del uso de materiales, de técnicas artesanales o de la reformulación de convenciones artísticas, y traduciéndolo a un lenguaje visual contemporáneo, desarrollando de esta manera ideas sobre el momento histórico en que vivimos.

Foto por Worldjunkies

T: ¿Cuál es el rol del curador dentro del mercado del arte desde una feria emergente con las características de MECA?

CAY: En mi opinión, el curador es un agente de valorización ya sea dentro de una institución o de un espacio comercial, ya que crea capital cultural al seleccionar artistas para sus proyectos. En el caso de MECA, que es en estos momentos es la única feria de arte en Puerto Rico, es también un agente catalizador al contribuir a la creación de una infraestructura de apoyo a los artistas locales y a la escena artística local en general. La feria no solo es un espacio de venta de obras de arte, también es un espacio de diálogo entre geografías y un espacio de encuentro entre los diferentes actores de la escena cultural.

Gustavo Arroniz

Gustavo Arroniz
Arroniz Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City
http://arroniz-arte.com/

T: ¿Qué los motivó a participar en MECA y cómo estas motivaciones se relacionan con los artistas que presentan en su booth?

Gustavo Arroniz: Mi interés en participar en MECA surge por una combinación de factores. Primero, es un proyecto muy honesto y con mucha valentía organizado por gente como Danny Báez, con quien he llevado una relación de mucho diálogo e ideas en común. Por otro lado, hace años participé en la extinta feria CIRCA y me quedé interesado en la zona. Creo que MECA puede encontrar un lugar interesante dentro de la escena caribeña hacia escenas cercanas como las de México, Estados Unidos y Sudamérica.  

Los artistas que seleccioné, primero, responden a un sentimiento de frescura donde los trabajos cuentan con una libertad y pensamiento que se conecta con mi idea de la zona, sin embargo, también me interesa presentar una perspectiva nueva y diferente. Al ser una feria joven decidí presentar a dos jóvenes artistas que comienzan a forjarse un camino internacional: Victoire Barbot, de Francia quien reside en México, y Christian Camacho. Ellos acompañados de Omar Rodríguez Graham, un pintor más maduro pero aún con un deseo ferviente de experimentación pictórica.

Foto por Worldjunkies

T: ¿Cuáles crees que son los retos del mercado latinoamericano actualmente?

GA: El mercado latinoamericano está en constante lucha con las crisis económicas y políticas. Puerto Rico es un gran ejemplo de esta situación. Sin embargo, estas crisis han impulsado a los artistas y espacios de exposición a empujar todavía más fuerte.  El reto es hacer que estos esfuerzos logren sostenerse ante un mercado voraz y cambiante, donde las tendencias se inclinan cada vez hacía lo establecido. MECA va contra corriente y es un comienzo de algo. Me gusta participar y apoyar un proyecto nuevo donde las posibilidades parecen pocas pero grandes.

Agustina Ferreyra

Agustina Ferreyra
Agustina Ferreyra, San Juan, Puerto Rico
https://www.agustinaferreyra.com/

T: ¿Qué te motivó a participar en MECA y cómo estas motivaciones se relacionan con los artistas que presentas en tu booth?

Agustina Ferreyra: Me motivó el hecho de que me encuentro en un momento de transición en la galería, pues mi espacio no va a existir aquí en Puerto Rico de manera permanente y me parecía que el timming entre la feria y mi última exhibición antes de irme a México, era un buen momento para participar. Además, soy muy amiga de Dany así como de muchos de los otros exhibidores que vienen. Definitivamente es una feria que ocurre en un momento complicado, no solo a nivel mundial sino a nivel local, entonces pues hay muchos retos.

En el booth presento a Julio Suárez, artista puertorriqueño con quien trabajo desde que abrí la galería y cuyo trabajo es bastante conocido localmente, lo que me pareció interesante presentarlo en la feria. Su trabajo es presentado en diálogo con la obra de Heather Guertin que es una pintora americana con quien también trabajo. Me parece que guardan una relación formal interesante entre los gestos pictóricos de Heather vs. la geometría y el monocromo de Julio, no hay mucha más ciencia detrás de eso, es un pareo bastante intuitivo y subjetivo. Así mismo,  en la galería estoy presentando una exhibición de Julio a partir de la cual el booth sirve como una extensión de la misma y se complementan bien.

Foto por Worldjunkies

T: ¿Cuáles crees que son los retos del mercado latinoamericano actualmente?

AF: El mayor reto del mercado latinoamericano, en mi opinión, es lograr internacionalizar el trabajo de los artistas a nivel institucional. Siendo una galería joven, eso toma tiempo. Muchos curadores institucionales prefieren hacer exhibiciones con artistas establecidos, sin embargo, poco a poco los museos se están abriendo a artistas más jóvenes. Y bueno, además de eso, el reto también es establecer y mantener relaciones a largo plazo con coleccionistas que apoyen las galerías emergentes.

Cabría agregar que los galeristas jóvenes operamos en un sistema que no se ha revisado por los pasados 40 o 50 años, es un sistema colapsado y diseñado para otra economía. El mundo del arte actual está regido por galerías que dentro de dicho sistema lograron éxito y estabilidad económica, pero no es nuestra realidad, por lo que debemos encontrar formas de modificar dicha economía del arte, volcarnos más a lo nomádico, a las estructuras colaborativas e incluso reinventar el concepto de “feria de arte”.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Rican/Struction

Princess Pompom in The Villa of Flowers

Word Weary

Temporama