Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Home — So Different, So Appealing, at LACMA, Los Angeles

by Andrew Berardini Los Angeles, California, USA 06/11/2017 – 10/15/2017

Installation photo featuring Abraham Cruzvillegas’s Autoconstrucción, 2010 in the exhibition Home—So Different, So Appealing at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, June 11, 2017 – October 15, 2017, © Abraham Cruzvillegas, photo © Museum Associates/LACMA

All of our homes and would-be paradises: the Utopias we dream, our parent’s fantasies and realities, the homes we come from, the one we live in now, that place we fantasize about; all of it layered, one room leading to the next, one home leading to another.

Our attempts at making a home are always aspirational, a reach for a better place, ever closer to perfection. Utopia’s always a fiction on the far side of the horizon, somewhere over the rainbow, in the Big Rocky Candy Mountain [1]. But we aim for it because what we have has failed us and we have just enough hope and confidence to make something better, or at least attempt to. Even if often co-opted, capitalized upon, and defanged of all its revolutionary fire in time, each attempt for a better life affects others, inspires and challenges those that come after.

We edge closer, as close as circumstance allows, to paradise. We do our best to make a home.

Here at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (and now in the Museum of Fine Arte of Houston), forty-two or so Latin artists from the US and Latin America–with an emphasis on Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Mexico–with over 100 artworks explore, confound, dream, and remember home. As the opening salvo of the Getty’s region-wide initiative “Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA” –exploring Latin art from across the Americas– this exhibition provides a literal home as a place from were the rest of PST can spread into hundreds of other venues across Southern California.

The exhibition curators, Mari Carmen Ramírez, curator of Latin American art at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston; Chon Noriega, of UCLA’s Chicano Studies Research Center; and Pilar Tompkins Rivas, director of the Vincent Price Art Museum at East Los Angeles College, pulled the name for their exhibition from Richard Hamilton’s iconic pop collage from 1956, “Just what is it that makes today’s so different, so appealing?” A question easily pulled from that era’s post-war fantasies and consumerist yearnings and preening in the piece itself: a hunky bodybuilder fisting an oversized Tootsie Pop; whilst on the sofa a busty and pastied lady arranges her mostly unclad body just so, with canned ham and vacuum cleaners and a sparky television all beaming out. A sarcastic layering of all our advertised hungers collapsed into a living room. At LACMA, the subtle and not-so-subtle explorations of this topic hints at the conditions and realities of Latin Americans where ever they’ve made home.

Where and what is home? The place where you keep your clothes. The space you sleep. The things you carry. Where you hide out. Where others can find you. Where your loved ones wait for you. What’s left behind. A place of aspiration or the hard reality of whatever the struggle to find comfort and safety might be.

Or even sometimes, home can be where they live, where they hide out, where they find comfort and safety and not you do not.

Installation photo featuring Daniel Joseph Martinez’s The House that America Built, 2004-2017 in the exhibition Home—So Different, So Appealing at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, June 11, 2017 – October 15, 2017, © Daniel Joseph Martinez, photo © Museum Associates/LACMA

Los Angeles’ Daniel Joseph Martinez’s recreates the Unabomber’s cabin painted with the Martha Stewart Collection’s preferred colors for this season’s home and then splits it down the middle in homage to Gordon Matta-Clark’s iconic “Splitting” (1974). Titled “The House America Built,” an anti-technological home-grown American terrorist finds his drop-out cabin adorned with the hypercapitalist normativity of America’s favorite corrupt homemaker (the hues like creamy popsicles for comforted children). Matta-Clark’s architectural interventions, building’s sliced and topped, punched holes in what reality and the buildings we live and work really mean and his split house opens up the privacy of the lives lived indoors to literally reveal what lies within. In a single work, Martinez collapses the polarities of our worst fears with our most commercial aspirations and reveals with a referential slice not only the interior polarities of terror and capital that built too much of a country that 323 million call home, most of whom left their homes elsewhere or are descendants of the same to make a new one here.

We leave where we were born for a reason. Moving on we hope to move on.

And Abraham Cruzvillegas, an artist from Mexico, scraps together a home as he did where he grew up –in a place of poverty you make it yourself with what’s a hand– a process he call autoconstruccion that here becomes a rich site of metaphor. In Miguel Angel Ríos video The Ghost of Modernity (Lixiviados), 2012, shacks scrapped together from rusted corrugated metal and whatever else can be salvaged fall from a sunny sky, one after another, onto a rocky plain. The title hints at the cube as a unit of modernity, and the “ghost” perhaps it’s broken down incarnation here. Watching shack after battered shack land on the rocks feels almost funny, a comedy of the absurd. Dorothy’s Kansas home tornadoed all the way to this very earthy landscape, but these building are so downbeat, broke down, and just barely held together, and in their ramshackle state they invite a pathos, a whisper of tragedy. Though they could easily be homes by the appearance of woods sheds, here prodding that they are homes hints at a precarity and poverty, a life easily swept away. Modernity even promised to many of its dreamers a promise of relief from poverty and deprivation. And the conditions of many have improved, but too many have been left behind.

Installation photo of the exhibition Home—So Different, So Appealing at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, June 11, 2017 – October 15, 2017, photo © Museum Associates/LACMA

Where and what is Utopia? Could it be, Thomas More’s “no-place”, a perfection that’s interchangeable with dystopia? An ideal always reached for but never reached. Where your loved ones wait for you. What lies ahead.

Like Thomas Wolfe says, you can’t go home again.

Our homes are not intellectual games conceived by architects, our ideas are not picked off a shelf from philosophers, the issues we fight for are shaped by our times, but we also individually shape them in our actions of support, rebellion, and apathy. We inherit things and spaces and we make them ours. Our personal lives, our lifestyles create and shape space with every meal, every caress, every picture we hang on the wall.

Bachelard says somewhere in The Poetics of Space that the architecture of your childhood home becomes the architecture for your unconscious.  I haven’t lived there since I left at as a teenager. Instead, it lives in me. My last home sat in the neighborhood were my father was a child, where my child was a child. I was evicted and it was torn down to make condos for young professionals. If this is the architecture of my child’s unconscious as Bachelard says, what does it mean when that’s being destroyed by economic forces beyond our control?

Books and art and spice and ceramics and furniture. A small sanctuary to share with those I care about. A sanctuary I made with them. A place to work in peace. A room of my own. A room with a view. I can make another.

Carmen Argote, 720 Sq. Ft.:Household Mutations – Part B (at gallery G727), 2010. Carpet from artist’s childhood home and house paint, 798 1/2 x 178 in. Courtesy of the Artist. © Carmen Argote

Carmen Argote slit the carpet from her childhood home in 720 Sq. Ft. Household Mutations — Part B, 2010, here the necessity of a living space contrasts with the vastness of the gallery that inhabits it. A sense of home that dropped into this grand room feels humble and true.

Somewhere beneath all this is the question of what unites these works beyond the simple geography of Latin America or having originally come from there. Shared histories can be easily pointed out both politically and aesthetically, but perhaps what makes this show really daring in its way is that it doesn’t attempt to too easily reduce a wild array of viewpoints into a narrow, closed notion of place, rather it opens it up. The idea of home, both simple and universal, steady and precarious, gives enough of what’s at stake for these artists to feel expansive in the best way.

Laura Aguilar, In Sandy’s Room, 1989, Gelatin silver print, 52 × 42 3/4 in. (132.08 × 108.59 cm), Courtesy of UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center and Library & Archive, © Laura Aguilar

It is not always where and from where we make our homes, but who we are and how we wish to make them.

All the rest is no less important even if it’s incidental.

My favorite image of the show comes from Laura Aguilar in In Sandy’s Room, 1989. A voluptuous naked women, leans in a vinyl chair framed by a double open window as she nods off in front of a fan, a beverage in hand. Underneath all the heavy politics of displacement and migration, precarity and poverty, terrorists and Martha Stewart, home is really where we can take off our clothes, get loose, and chill. Not Utopia perhaps, but close enough.


Andrew Berardini is an American writer known for his work as a visual art critic and curator in Los Angeles. Berardini works primarily between genres, which he describes as “quasi-essayistic prose poems on art and other vaguely lusty subjects.”

* The exhibition is now on tour, currently at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through January 21, 2018

[1] Song by Harry ‘Haywire’ McClintock.

Installation photo featuring Abraham Cruzvillegas’s Autoconstrucción, 2010 in the exhibition Home—So Different, So Appealing at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, June 11, 2017 – October 15, 2017, © Abraham Cruzvillegas, photo © Museum Associates/LACMA

Todos nuestros hogares y posibles paraísos: las utopías que soñamos, las fantasías y realidades de nuestros padres, los hogares de donde venimos, en el que vivimos ahora, ese lugar con el que fantaseamos; todo superpuesto, una habitación que conduce a la siguiente, un hogar que conduce a otro.

Nuestros intentos de hacer un hogar siempre son aspiracionales, un esfuerzo por un lugar mejor, cada vez más cerca de la perfección. La utopía es siempre una ficción en el extremo del horizonte, en algún lugar sobre el arcoiris, en Big Rocky Candy Mountain [1]. Pero lo buscamos porque lo que tenemos nos ha fallado y tenemos suficiente esperanza y confianza para hacer algo mejor, o al menos intentar hacerlo. Incluso si a menudo es cooptado, capitalizado y despojado de todo su fuego revolucionario en el momento preciso, cada intento de una vida mejor afecta a los demás, inspira y desafía a los que vienen después.

Nos acercamos, tan cerca como las circunstancias lo permitan, al paraíso. Hacemos nuestro mejor esfuerzo para hacer un hogar.

Aquí, en el Museo de Arte del Condado de Los Ángeles (y ahora en el Museo de Bellas Artes de Houston), con más de 100 obras de arte, cuarenta y dos artistas latinos de EE.UU. Y Latinoamérica (con énfasis en Cuba, Puerto Rico y México) exploran, confunden, sueñan y recuerdan su hogar. Como muestra inicial de la iniciativa de la Fundación Getty, “Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA” – misma que explora el arte latino de todo el continente americano –, esta exposición proporciona literalmente un hogar como aquel lugar donde el resto del PST se puede propagar hacia cientos de otras sedes a través del Sureste de California.

Los curadores de la exposición, Mari Carmen Ramírez, curadora de arte latinoamericano en el Museo de Bellas Artes de Houston; Chon Noriega, del Centro de Investigación de Estudios Chicanos de la UCLA; y Pilar Tompkins Rivas, directora del Museo de Arte Vincent Price en East Los Angeles College, tomaron el nombre de su exposición del icónico collage pop de Richard Hamilton de 1956, “Just what is it that makes today’s so different, so appealing?” Una pregunta extraída fácilmente de las fantasías de posguerra y los anhelos consumistas de esa época, y jactándose en la pieza misma: un fisioculturista atractivo por su masculinidad empuña una Tootsie Pop de gran tamaño mientras en el sofá una mujer pechugona y enjoyada arregla su cuerpo mayormente desnudo, con jamón enlatado y aspiradoras y un televisor chispeante transmitiendo. Una superposición sarcástica de todas nuestras hambres publicitadas, colapsadas en una sala de estar. En el LACMA, las exploraciones sutiles y no tan sutiles de este tema apuntan a las condiciones y realidades de los latinoamericanos donde sea que hayan hecho su hogar.

¿Qué es y donde está el hogar? El lugar donde guardas tu ropa. El espacio donde duermes. Las cosas que llevas. Donde te escondes. Donde otros pueden encontrarte. Donde tus seres queridos esperan por ti. Lo que queda atrás. Un lugar de aspiración o la dura realidad de la lucha por encontrar comodidad y seguridad donde sea que se encuentre.

O incluso a veces, el hogar puede ser el lugar donde viven, donde se esconden, donde ellxs encuentran la comodidad y la seguridad y no tú.

Installation photo featuring Daniel Joseph Martinez’s The House that America Built, 2004-2017 in the exhibition Home—So Different, So Appealing at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, June 11, 2017 – October 15, 2017, © Daniel Joseph Martinez, photo © Museum Associates/LACMA

Daniel Joseph Martínez de Los Ángeles recrea la cabaña de Unabomber pintada con los colores preferidos de la Colección Martha Stewart para la casa de esta temporada para después dividirla por el medio en homenaje a la obra icónica “Splitting” (1974) de Gordon Matta-Clark. Titulada “The House America Built”, un terrorista norteamericano anti-tecnológico local encuentra su cabaña abandonada adornada con la normatividad hipercapitalista de la favorita ama de casa corrupta de Estados Unidos (los tonos son como paletas cremosas para niños reconfortados). Las intervenciones arquitectónicas de Matta-Clark – edificios rebanados y coronados, agujeros perforados en lo que la realidad y los edificios en los que habitamos y trabajamos realmente siginifican y su casa dividida –, abre la privacidad de las vidas vividas en el interior para revelar literalmente lo que hay dentro. En un solo trabajo, Martínez colapsa las polaridades de nuestros peores miedos con nuestras aspiraciones más comerciales y revela, con una porción referencial, no solo las polaridades interiores del terror y el capital que construyeron demasiado de un país que 323 millones llaman hogar, la mayoría de los cuales dejó sus hogares en otros lugares o son descendientes de los mismos para hacer uno nuevo aquí.

Salimos de donde nacimos por una razón. Avanzando, esperamos seguir adelante.

Y Abraham Cruzvillegas, un artista de México, a partir de restos reúne un hogar como lo hizo en el lugar donde creció – en un lugar de pobreza lo haces tú mismo con lo que tienes a la mano –, un proceso que él llama autoconstrucción que aquí se convierte en un sitio rico de metáfora. En el video de Miguel Angel Ríos The Ghost of Modernity (Lixiviados), 2012, las chozas formadas por chatarra de metal oxidado corrugado y todo lo que se pueda rescatar caen de un cielo soleado, en una llanura rocosa, uno tras otro. El título insinúa que el cubo es una unidad de la modernidad, y el “fantasma” tal vez se trata aquí de una desintegración. Ver aterrizar en las rocas una choza maltrecha después de otra choza parece casi gracioso, una comedia de lo absurdo. La casa de Dorothy en Kansas es arrastrada por un tornado hasta este paisaje terrenal, pero estos edificios son tan desesperanzados, se rompieron y apenas se mantienen unidos, y en su ruinoso estado invitan a un pathos, un susurro de tragedia. A pesar de que podrían ser fácilmente hogares por apariencia de cobertizos de madera, aquí se insiste en que son insinuaciones de hogares en una precariedad y pobreza, una vida fácilmente invisibilizada. La modernidad incluso prometió a muchos de sus soñadores, una promesa de socorro de la pobreza y las privaciones. Y las condiciones de muchos han mejorado, pero demasiados han quedado atrás.

Installation photo of the exhibition Home—So Different, So Appealing at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, June 11, 2017 – October 15, 2017, photo © Museum Associates/LACMA

¿Qué es y dónde está la utopía? ¿Podría ser, el “no-lugar” de Thomas More, una perfección que es intercambiable con la distopía? Un ideal siempre aspirado pero nunca alcanzado. Donde tus seres queridos esperan por ti. Lo que espera adelante.

Como dice Thomas Wolfe, no puedes volver a casa.

Nuestros hogares no son juegos intelectuales concebidos por arquitectos, nuestras ideas no son recogidas de un estante de los filósofos, los temas por los que luchamos están modelados por nuestro tiempo, pero también los moldeamos individualmente en nuestras acciones de apoyo, rebelión y apatía. Heredamos cosas y espacios y los hacemos nuestros. Nuestras vidas personales, nuestros estilos de vida, crean y dan forma al espacio con cada comida, cada caricia, cada imagen que colgamos en la pared.

En alguna parte de The Poetics of Space, Bachelard menciona que la arquitectura de la casa de tu infancia se convierte en la arquitectura de tu inconsciente. Yo no he vivido ahí desde que me fui cuando era un adolescente. En cambio, vive en mí. Mi última casa estaba en el vecindario donde mi padre fue un niño, donde mi hijo fue un niño. Fui desalojado y fue demolido para hacer condominios para jóvenes profesionales. Si esta es la arquitectura del inconsciente de mi hijo, como dice Bachelard, ¿qué significa cuando eso está siendo destruido por fuerzas económicas que escapan a nuestro control?

Libros y arte y especias y cerámica y muebles. Un pequeño santuario para compartir con aquellos que me importan. Un santuario que hice con ellos. Un lugar para trabajar en paz. Una habitación propia. Un cuarto con vista. Puedo hacer otro.

Carmen Argote, 720 Sq. Ft.:Household Mutations – Part B (at gallery G727), 2010. Carpet from artist’s childhood home and house paint, 798 1/2 x 178 in. Courtesy of the Artist. © Carmen Argote

Carmen Argote cortó la alfombra de la casa de su infancia en 720 Sq. Ft. Household Mutations — Part B, 2010, aquí la necesidad de espacio habitable contrasta con la vastedad de la galería que la habita. Una sensación de hogar que al caer en esta gran sala se siente humilde y verdadera.

En algún lugar debajo de todo esto está la cuestión de qué une estas obras más allá de la geografía simple de América Latina o que originalmente hayan venido de allí. Las historias compartidas se pueden señalar fácilmente tanto desde el punto de vista político como estético, pero quizás lo que hace que esta exhibición sea realmente osada a su manera, es que no intenta reducir demasiado fácilmente una amplia gama de puntos de vista a una noción estrecha y cerrada de lugar, sino que lo abre. La idea de hogar, tanto simple como universal, estable y precaria, da suficiente de lo que está en juego para que estos artistas se sientan expansivos de la mejor manera.

Laura Aguilar, In Sandy’s Room, 1989, Gelatin silver print, 52 × 42 3/4 in. (132.08 × 108.59 cm), Courtesy of UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center and Library & Archive, © Laura Aguilar

No siempre es en qué lugar o desde donde construimos nuestros hogares, sino quiénes somos y cómo deseamos hacerlos.

El resto no es menos importante, incluso si es incidental.

Mi imagen favorita de la muestra proviene de Laura Aguilar en In Sandy’s Room, 1989. Una voluptuosa mujer desnuda, se apoya en una silla de vinilo enmarcada por una doble ventana abierta mientras asiente frente a un ventilador, una bebida en mano. Debajo de todas las políticas pesadas de desplazamiento y migración, la precariedad y la pobreza, los terroristas y Martha Stewart, el hogar es realmente donde podemos quitarnos la ropa, soltarnos y relajarnos. Tal vez no una utopía, pero lo suficientemente cerca.


Andrew Berardini es un escritor estadounidense conocido por su trabajo como crítico de arte y curador en Los Ángeles. Berardini trabaja principalmente entre géneros, lo que describe como “poemas en prosa quasi-ensayísticos sobre arte y otros sujetos lujuriosos.”

* La exposición ahora se encuentra itinerando, actualmente en el Museo de Bellas Artes, Houston, hasta el 21 de enero, 2018

[1] Canción de Harry ‘Haywire’ McClintock.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Dredgers on the Rail

El espacio entre las cosas

MARGINALIA #33

Sense, Attitude and Present