Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Gallery Weekend México

by Fabiola Iza Mexico City 09/18/2015 – 09/20/2015
IMG_5092

General view of Plaza Río de Janeiro 54. 1983 – 2015, OMR gallery. Courtesy of the gallery. Photo: Leonardo Flores Villar.

Gallery Weekend

In a nation where annual budget cuts to cultural and arts funding are practically a national tradition, the 2015 Gallery Weekend event offered proof the Mexico City arts scene—a mix of commercial galleries and non-profit initiatives—is giving rise to a bumper crop of projects and moving forward vigorously, even outside the realm of state sponsorship. Gallery Weekend’s three-day agenda left behind ample evidence the city’s arts production is wide-ranging, both in interests and in terms of media, as well as when it comes to the overall quality of the projects presented along its circuit.

The most established galleries, players on an international level, presented solid projects that reinforce their reputations. One of the most notable was Plaza Río de Janeiro 54. 1983-2015, a show with which Galería OMR said farewell to the space it has occupied for more than thirty years. The exhibition was a museography exercise that, more than revealing curatorial concerns, worked as a staging of the gallery’s history. Organized alphabetically, the show grouped artworks around a constellation of artists that have collaborated with the gallery over time and presented them using a device that alternately resembled past exhibitions, a warehouse, a cabinet or even a workspace. The dynamism that suffuses the show—which easily could have been a single installation—portrays the gallery’s active history and serves as a perfect prelude for generating interest and anticipation about OMR’s future in its new home.

Missika_Zeitgeber_4

Adrien Missika, Higher Future (Agave), 2015. Back, left to right: Adrien Missika, Wabi-sabi, 2015; Adrien Missika, Sian Ka’an 2, from the series Stargazer, 2015; Adrien Missika, Yautepec 1, from the series Stargazer, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and the galery. Photo: Moritz Bernoully.

In turn, Proyectos Monclova presented Zeitgeber, a solo show by Adrien Missika. Made up of artworks suggesting an at once futurist and contemplative narrative, here visitors discern a clear reflection on time. Higher Future (Agave), a sculpture made of metal rods supporting flowerpot/buckets that contain agave cacti, appears to erect a column; the lightjet prints seen behind the sculpture feature apparently cosmic landscapes that are in fact failed efforts by the artist who, swinging in a hammock (hammocks have been the origin of other artworks) wanted to capture the moon, framed between trees. Another piece that revolves around a repetitive act, the artist’s incessant searching and his patience when it comes to achieving the task, is Agave Agapé, a video in which Missika tries to rhythmically cut an agave blossom. With reinforcement from the series entitled Biosphere—small biospheres that safeguard plants and look like jet-packs—Zeitgeber takes up the life/death cycle as it relates to cosmic time.

GHG, Los justos desconocidos

Óscar Benassini, Justo desconocido 1 y 2, 2015, at Hilario Galguera gallery.

Part of a less poetic tendency, Galería Hilario Galguera presented Los justos desconocidos (de todas maneras cago), a collective exhibition curated by Víctor Palacios that takes inspiration from a notion of expanded generosity. Palacios transfers that concern to the contemporary art realm and wonders if an artwork can be a generous act—if it can be valuable and socially responsible. Far from providing answers or adopting a position of simple political condemnation, the exhibition tries to disentangle these problematics in every piece, including a portrait of Marcial Maciel by Mauricio Limón or the landscapes of urban ruin Tláhuac Mata’s paintings portray. A number of other artists transported this statement to the commercial realm and reflect on the artwork’s reification as well as the transmutation of value this makes possible. Can generosity exist, in fact, when something is expected in return? In Justo desconocido I, Óscar Benassini summarizes a great many of the show’s curatorial disquiets; the work is a nickeled and silver-plated sculpture of a dog as it defecates. The act of shitting is equally important to the show in general and the exhibition design invites consideration of walls that have been painted a difficult-to-discern hue—is it gold or is it crap?

Benassini’s value-assignment—and mockery thereof— finds its more direct counterpoint in Karmelo Bermejo’s Pepita de oro macizo pintada de oro falso. The title translates to “solid-gold pumpkin seed gilded in fool’s gold,” and the work presents a critical view of the complex relationship between the art market, the (violent) history that hides behind objects and value-designation, something that still seems to be one of the hot topics on the Mexico City scene.
At Kurimanzutto, Minerva Cuevas uses cacao, a currency in ancient times, to explore colonization processes that continue to operate within the trade, a good part of whose production is solely destined for foreign consumption. Despite the rigor of her research, the pieces recur to somewhat obvious denunciation strategies such as appropriation and brand-logo subversion. It ends up making Feast and Famine a somewhat rigid, Manichean affair.

cuevas_feastandfamine_2015_6

Minerva Cuevas, Feast and Famine, at kurimanzutto, 2015. Photo: Abigail Enzaldo

On the contrary, the project space at the same gallery presented ¿Por qué no fui tu amigo? by Daniel Aguilar Ruvalcaba, curated by Chris Sharp. Completed using a mere three pieces—a classified ad, an installation with computer equipment/accessories and two banknotes photocopied onto “poetry paper”—the exhibition activates a series of questions on value-designation, currency circulation and putative cultural philanthropy. The project emerges from an event that marked the artist’s childhood—his father lost everything to bank debts—yet ironically, an emerging-artist fellowship from the same bank now helps support Aguilar Ruvalcaba’s creative endeavors. The computer equipment installation is to be simultaneously sold as merchandise per se on Mercado Libre—Mexico’s version of Ebay—as well as in the gallery, as a work of art. Finally, the artist responds to the bank’s philanthropic mission by reintroducing family history via the classified ad, which offers to pay off debts that anyone who happens to have his father’s name may be carrying.

ruvalcaba_porquenofuituamigo_2015_3

Daniel Aguilar Ruvalcaba, TE LLAMAS JUAN MANUEL AGUILAR Y LE DEBES DINERO A BANCOMER? TE PUEDO AYUDAR A PAGAR TU ADEUDO MARCAME! DANIEL: 477.351.19.59., 2015. Courtesy of the artist and kurimanzutto. Photo: Abigail Enzaldo.

ruvalcaba_porquenofuituamigo_2015_3b

Daniel Aguilar Ruvalcaba, TE LLAMAS JUAN MANUEL AGUILAR Y LE DEBES DINERO A BANCOMER? TE PUEDO AYUDAR A PAGAR TU ADEUDO MARCAME! DANIEL: 477.351.19.59., 2015. Courtesy of the artist and kurimanzutto. Photo: Abigail Enzaldo.

The fact that a series of participating newcomer galleries has consolidated itself to play a more influential role on the local scene is perhaps Gallery Weekend’s most gratifying surprise; Marso, Proyecto Paralelo and Arredondo\Arozarena are the clearest examples. All run by directors under 35, these galleries have committed to developing projects by up-and-coming artists as well as providing visibility to creators with more long-term trajectories who have yet to receive much commercial attention. The latest addition along these lines is Parque Galería, which is seeking “to reveal oppressive structures often not recognized as such” through its artists’ work. If the stated mission lacks subtlety, the projects presented in this inaugural show approached political themes in an intelligent, unpredictable fashion. Andrea Geyer’s Timefold, for example, is a photographic series portraying the diaries of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, founder of the Whitney Museum and a key figure to modern art’s development in the United States. Certain pages of her diary have been ripped out and by focusing on their absence, Geyer sketches a parallel between that omission and a constant lack of women’s inclusion in the writing of history.

PARQUE-AG-Timefold-08

Andrea Geyer, Timefold (from the diaries of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney), 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Parque Galería.

Gallery Weekend 2015 showed that Mexico City is home to a burgeoning artistic community. It also demonstrated that unlike other art centers such as New York or Berlin, there is room to grow here; that a space of possibility exists. Only time will tell if we find more golden pumpkin seeds in future editions—or if we discover that in fact they were fool’s gold.

 

IMG_5092

Vista general de Plaza Río de Janeiro 54. 1983 – 2015, Galería OMR. Cortesía de la galería. Fotografía: Leonardo Flores Villar.

Gallery Weekend

En un país donde los recortes anuales a la cultura y las artes son casi una tradición gubernamental, la edición 2015 del Gallery Weekend dejó ver que en la escena artística de la ciudad de México, conformada tanto por galerías comerciales como por iniciativas sin fines de lucro, se están gestando un buen número de proyectos y se trabaja vigorosamente aún fuera del mecenazgo estatal. Los tres días que duró el Gallery Weekend dejaron patente que la producción en la ciudad es diversa, tanto en intereses y medios, como en cuanto a la calidad de cada propuesta incluida en la ruta.

Las galerías más establecidas, ya con gran proyección internacional, presentaron proyectos sólidos que dan cuenta de su calibre. Entre ellas destacó Plaza Río de Janeiro 54. 1983 2015, muestra con la que la galería OMR se despide del espacio que ha ocupado por más de treinta años. La exposición es un ejercicio museográfico que, más que develar líneas curatoriales, sirve como una puesta en escena de la historia de la propia galería. Organizada alfabéticamente, la exposición agrupa obras de la pléyade de artistas con quienes han trabajado a lo largo de este tiempo y éstas se muestran en un dispositivo que se asemeja en momentos a exposiciones pasadas, a una bodega, en otros a un gabinete o incluso a un espacio de trabajo. El dinamismo que impregna a la exposición, que bien podría tratarse de una sola instalación, muestra la lo activa que ha sido la historia de la galería y sirve como el preludio perfecto para crear interés y anticipación sobre el futuro de OMR en su nuevo destino.

Missika_Zeitgeber_4

Adrien Missika, Higher Future (Agave), 2015. Al fondo, de izquierda a derecha: Adrien Missika, Wabi-sabi, 2015; Adrien Missika, Sian Ka’an 2, de la serie Stargazer, 2015; Adrien Missika, Yautepec 1, de la serie Stargazer, 2015. Cortesía del artista y la galería. Fotografía: Moritz Bernoully.

Por su parte, Proyectos Monclova presentó Zeitgeber, exposición individual de Adrien Missika. Conformada por piezas que van sugiriendo una narrativa futurista y a la vez contemplativa, una reflexión sobre el tiempo se hace patente en el recorrido. Higher Future (Agave), una escultura de varillas metálicas sobre las que se han colgado macetas-cubetas con plantas de agave parece intentar erigir una columna y las impresiones lightjet que se ven detrás de ella presentan paisajes aparentemente cósmicos, éstos son en realidad intentos fallidos del artista quien, columpiándose en una hamaca (las hamacas también dieron origen a otras piezas), deseaba capturar la luna enmarcada entre árboles. Otra pieza que gira entorno a la repetición de una acción, y a la búsqueda incesante y paciente del artista por lograr su cometido, es Agave Agapé, video en el cual Missika intenta cortar, rítmicamente, la flor del agave. Reforzado por la serie Biosphere, pequeñas biósferas que resguardan a una planta y que parecen mochilas propulsoras, Zeitgeber se preocupa por el ciclo de la vida y la muerte en relación con el tiempo cósmico.

GHG, Los justos desconocidos

Óscar Benassini, Justo desconocido 1 y 2, 2015, en galería Hilario Galguera.

Bajo una tónica menos poética, la Galería Hilario Galguera presenta Los justos desconocidos (de todas maneras cago), exposición colectiva curada por Víctor Palacios que se inspira en la idea de una generosidad expandida. Palacios transporta esta inquietud al terreno del arte contemporáneo y se pregunta si éste puede ser un acto de generosidad, si una obra puede ser valiosa y socialmente responsable. Lejos de ofrecer respuestas o asumir una postura de mera condena política, la exposición va desenredando estas problemáticas a través de cada pieza, entre las que se ve un retrato de Marcial Maciel de Mauricio Limón o los paisajes urbanos en ruinas en las pinturas de Tláhuac Mata. Varios más de los artistas llevaron este planteamiento al terreno comercial, y reflexionan sobre la reificación de la obra de arte y la transmutación de valor que ésta posibilita. ¿Puede acaso existir la generosidad cuando se espera, de facto, algo a cambio? En Justo desconocido I, Óscar Benassini engloba gran parte de las inquietudes curatoriales de la muestra; la obra es una escultura niquelada y chapada en plata de un perro defecando. El acto de cagar es igualmente importante en la exposición, y la museografía contempla muros revestidos por pintura cuyo color es difícil de discernir: ¿oro o mierda?

La asignación de valor –y la burla del mismo acto– realizada por Benassini encuentra una contraparte más directa en Pepita de oro macizo pintada de oro falso, de Karmelo Bermejo. Una mirada crítica sobre la compleja relación entre el mercado del arte, la historia (violenta) que se esconde tras los objetos, así como la asignación de valor, parece ser aún uno de los tópicos preponderantes en la escena de la ciudad. En Kurimanzutto, Minerva Cuevas explora a través del cacao, antiguo material de cambio, los procesos de colonización que continúan operando en el comercio del mismo: buena parte de su producción está destinada exclusivamente para el consumo extranjero. A pesar del rigor de la investigación llevada a cabo por Cuevas, las piezas recurren a estrategias de denuncia evidentes como lo es la apropiación y subversión de logotipos de una marca. Feast and Famine resulta por lo tanto una exposición un tanto rígida y maniquea.

cuevas_feastandfamine_2015_6

Minerva Cuevas, Feast and Famine, en la galería Kurimanzutto, 2015. Foto: Abigail Enzaldo

Por el contrario, la sala de proyectos de la misma galería presenta ¿Por qué no fui tu amigo? de Daniel Aguilar Ruvalcaba, curada por Chris Sharp. Resuelta únicamente en tres piezas –un anuncio clasificado, una instalación con aparatos y accesorios de cómputo, y dos billetes fotocopiados en ‘papel poesía’–, la exposición detona una serie de preguntas sobre la asignación de valor, la circulación monetaria y la supuesta filantropía cultural. El proyecto parte de un hecho que marcó la infancia del artista: su padre perdió todo ante una deuda bancaria. Irónicamente, es ahora el mismo banco quien apoya la carrera de Aguilar Ruvalcaba, pues es becario del programa para artistas emergentes de BBVA Bancomer. La instalación con aparatos de cómputo se vende, simultáneamente, en la página Mercado Libre –como aparatos de cómputo– y en la galería –como obra de arte–. Asimismo, el artista replica la misión filantrópica del banco y reinserta la narrativa familiar al ofrecerse a pagar, a través del anuncio clasificado, la deuda bancaria que tenga una persona con el mismo nombre que su padre.

ruvalcaba_porquenofuituamigo_2015_3

Daniel Aguilar Ruvalcaba, TE LLAMAS JUAN MANUEL AGUILAR Y LE DEBES DINERO A BANCOMER? TE PUEDO AYUDAR A PAGAR TU ADEUDO MARCAME! DANIEL: 477.351.19.59., 2015. Cortesía del artista y kurimanzutto. Fotografía: Abigail Enzaldo.

ruvalcaba_porquenofuituamigo_2015_3b

Daniel Aguilar Ruvalcaba, TE LLAMAS JUAN MANUEL AGUILAR Y LE DEBES DINERO A BANCOMER? TE PUEDO AYUDAR A PAGAR TU ADEUDO MARCAME! DANIEL: 477.351.19.59., 2015. Cortesía del artista y kurimanzutto. Fotografía: Abigail Enzaldo.

La consolidación de una serie de galerías jóvenes que se perfilan para jugar un papel más influyente en la escena local es, quizá, la sorpresa más grata del Gallery Weekend: Marso, Proyecto Paralelo y Arredondo/Arozarena son los exponentes más claros. Bajo el mando de directores jóvenes, menores de 35 años, dichas galerías han apostado por desarrollar proyectos con artistas emergentes pero también por dar visibilidad a artistas con una trayectoria más larga pero que han gozado de poca proyección comercial. La adición más reciente a esta estirpe es Parque Galería, que busca “revelar estructuras opresivas que a menudo no se reconocen como tal” a través de la obra de sus artistas. Si bien el cometido carece de sutileza, los proyectos presentados en la exposición inaugural se acercan a temas políticos de una manera inteligente y poco predecible. Por ejemplo, Timefold, de Andrea Geyer, es una serie fotográfica de los diarios de Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, fundadora del Museo Whitney y figura clave para el desarrollo del arte moderno en EEUU, de los cuales han sido arrancados algunas páginas. Al enfocarse en la ausencia de éstas, Geyer traza un paralelo entre esta omisión y la constante falta de inclusión de las mujeres en la escritura de la historia.

PARQUE-AG-Timefold-08

Andrea Geyer, Timefold (de los diarios de Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney), 2015. Cortesía de la artista y de Parque Galería.

La edición 2015 del Gallery Weekend demostró que la ciudad de México tiene una comunidad artística en ebullición, pero, a diferencia de otros centros de arte como Nueva York o Berlín, también deja ver que queda aún demasiado espacio para que ésta crezca, un espacio de posibilidad. Sólo el tiempo dirá si encontraremos más pepitas de oro en las siguientes ediciones, o si descubriremos que, en realidad, éstas eran de oro falso.

Tags: , , , , , ,

The Telomeric Cut

ARTMED 2017, Medellín

Espejo negro, elefante blanco

Armazém de Mim