Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Dancing on Graves: Steven Parrino at The Power Station, Dallas, Texas

By Lee Escobedo The Power Station, Dallas, Texas, USA 04/05/2017 – 06/16/2017
PS_april2017_11

Exhibition view, Dancing on Graves, Steven Parrino. The Power Station, Dallas, TX. Courtesy of The Power Station.

The romance of death is strewn across the Power Station’s floors like poetry. Steven Parrino has finally been given the American survey he deserved, Dancing on Graves at The Power Station in Dallas, Texas. This is the first institutional show for Parrino in the United States, located in an old Dallas Power & Light substation, spanning work made from 1979 to 2004 through painting, works on paper, sculpture, and video. Albeit, the show comes 12 years after he died; riding his own pale horse on New Year’s morning, a motorcycle accident on slippery roads hurdled him towards mortality in 2005 at age 46.

If alive today, Parrino would be shocked by none of this new found fame. His work dealt with the comedy of death: his own, his friend’s, of painting. He explored these possibilities by creating large-scale paintings thwarting expectations and academic assumptions on what a painting should look like, be about, and do.

PS_april2017_48

Exhibition view, Dancing on Graves, Steven Parrino. The Power Station, Dallas, TX. Courtesy of The Power Station.

Through his work, Parrino was killing his idols, and the canon he was working within, in order for it to evolve further. His work was a dark reflection of minimalism and the monochromatic palette which came before. Parrino’s work treaded theoretically somewhere between Andy Warhol, Yves Klein and the Hells Angels.

He attacked flatness with large geometric shaped pieces, like Untitled from 2004, which the Power Station puts on display on the first floor. Here, Parrino has created an inverted pyramid, at once an enhancing and reductive exercise on size and scale of painting. The cold hard walls and floor of the Power Station become the meeting points for three out of the piece’s four angles, with the fourth reaching towards the heavens. The black and grey painted canvas is stretched and wrinkled around the triangular shape of the frame, a body bag of sorts for a practice thought dead when Parrino began painting.

Parrino’s career as a noise musician serves as an ancillary access point to his theories on the condition of man and country. The noise he created with Blood Necklace and collaborations with visual artist, Jutta Koether were homogeneous to his visual output. They were different distillations of the same ennui, exhausting rage towards form and precedent: Parrino’s own artistic language full of barks and beatings. Parrino was blurring the lines between contemporary art and experimental music before it became the passé of every undergrad Liberal Arts major.

PS_april2017_44

Exhibition view, Dancing on Graves, Steven Parrino. The Power Station, Dallas, TX. Courtesy of The Power Station.

This can be empathized with his eulogy for a friend, 13 Shattered Panels (for Joey Ramone) from 2001. Observing the institution’s Instagram account, one can see Power Station manager, Gregory Ruppe and Italian conceptual artist, Piero Golia (who was in town for the Dallas Art Fair) took turns bashing in the black enamel paintings with a baseball bat. Post-mortem, the paintings sit upright, side-by-side, sometimes stacked, on the second floor of the museum. Shards and materials lie like body parts on the battlefield. The debris on the floor serves a similar role as the poetry device known as a, “pillow word” (a phrase to denote a break) or the filmmaking device, “pillow shots” (a cut to a street lamp or sunset after an intense bit of dialogue). These linguistic and aesthetic narrative functions are meant as pauses for mediation, breaks between action that allow for the viewer to reflect on what they just saw. They are usually situated between “what was” and “what will be” within the story. The scrapes of mutilated panel, sometimes met with such violence it returns to it’s origins of dust and sand, serve as “pillow markings”, moments of pause for us to not focus on gestures, but instead contemplate our own complicity in the violence of society and the self.

3 Units of Aluminum Death Shifter, from 1992, hangs on the second floor as a direct descendent of John Chamberlin, if the artist had toyed with bed sheets. It brings to mind the language used in mobster and action films about bringing upon your own demise (“You’ve made your bed, now lie in it”). It’s hyper-masculine prose, that when contrasted by Parrino’s choice of materials, it gives way to a textured reading of where his practice fits: between the abstraction that came before him and the fatalism of the early 2000’s era, one of Vice-inspired New York mixed-media artists. The enamel on canvas work gives us the scene of three crimes, or at least that’s one interpretation. The three aluminum-colored shapes outline the stains of human forms. The folds and creases on this piece are harsh and unforgiving, crushed into the canvas with ferocity, or perhaps made to appear so. The abnegation is palpable, nonetheless. At once, Parrino is rejecting everything and nothing within the field of painting.

PS_april2017_39

Exhibition view, Dancing on Graves, Steven Parrino. The Power Station, Dallas, TX. Courtesy of The Power Station.

The Power Station lends embellishment of Parrino’s mythos itself, by sheer name and structure. Its large industrial architecture makes the painting’s nihilism echo throughout its floors. It could easily be the site of a 1980’s (or current) noise show, a scenario that occurs through the show’s own entropy, by way of the installation, Dancing on Graves (1999), the five-minute video for which the show takes it’s title. A small monitor sits next to two small speakers, and three broken and combined black panels. The video piece is an amalgam of sex and dread. From the grainy footage we see a woman gazing back at us, dancing on similar materials while teasing, perhaps taunting us. Noise blisters out of the speakers, calling us from the grave. We then see Parrino providing punishment upon his works, then blackness, followed by absence. It seems through his experiments in noise, Parrino found silence can be annihilating.

 

Lee Escobedo is a Dallas-based critic, curator, and artist. His work can be found in Berlin Art Link, ArtDesk, Glasstire, and The Dallas Morning News. He was the 2017 Artist Circle co-programmer at The Nasher Sculpture Center and has been invited to program or curate by The Fort Worth Modern Museum of Art, The Dallas Art Fair, and Southern Methodist University.

PS_april2017_11

Vista de exhibición, Dancing on Graves, Steven Parrino. The Power Station, Dallas, TX. Cortesía de The Power Station.

Como poesía, el romance de la muerte está esparcido a lo largo del suelo del Power Station. Steven Parrino finalmente obtiene la muestra americana que merecía, Dancing on Graves en The Power Station de Dallas, Texas. Ubicada en una antigua subestación de la compañía Power & Light de Dallas, esta es la primera exhibición institucional para Parrino en los Estados Unidos que abarca obras realizadas entre 1979 y 2004 a través de la pintura, obras sobre papel, escultura y video. Sin embargo, la exhibición llega 12 años después de su muerte; montando su propio pálido caballo en la mañana de Año Nuevo, un accidente de motocicleta en carreteras resbaladizas le arrastró hacia la muerte en 2005 a la edad de 46 años.

Si hoy estuviera vivo, Parrino no se sorprendería por nada de esta nueva fama. Su obra trataba sobre la comedia de la muerte: la suya, la de sus amigos, la de la pintura. Exploró estas posibilidades creando pinturas a gran escala que frustran las expectativas y las suposiciones académicas sobre qué aspecto debe tener una pintura, que debe ser y hacer.

PS_april2017_48

Vista de exhibición, Dancing on Graves, Steven Parrino. The Power Station, Dallas, TX. Cortesía de The Power Station.

A través de su obra, Parrino asesinaba a sus ídolos y al canon con el que trabajaba para que éste evolucionara más. Su trabajo era una oscura reflexión del minimalismo y la paleta monocromática que le precedió. La obra de Parrino se movió teóricamente entre Andy Warhol, Yves Klein y los Hells Angels.

Atacó la planitud con obras de formas geométricas grandes, como Untitled de 2004, que The Power Station pone en exhibición en el primer piso. Aquí, Parrino ha creado una pirámide invertida, a la vez un ejercicio de aumento y reducción en el tamaño y la escala de la pintura. Los crudos muros y el suelo del Power Station se convierten en puntos de encuentro de tres de los cuatro vértices de la pieza, con el cuarto extendiéndose hacia los cielos. El lienzo negro y gris es estirado y arrugado alrededor de la forma triangular del marco, una especie de bolso para cadáver para una práctica pensada muerta cuando Parrino comenzó a pintar.

La carrera de Parrino como músico noise sirve como punto de acceso auxiliar a sus teorías sobre la condición del hombre y del país. El ruido que creó con Blood Necklace y las colaboraciones con el artista visual Jutta Koether, fueron homogéneas a su producción visual. Eran diferentes destilaciones del mismo tedio, de la agotadora rabia hacia la forma y el precedente: el lenguaje artístico de Parrino lleno de ladridos y palizas. Parrino estaba difuminando las líneas entre el arte contemporáneo y la música experimental antes de que esto se convirtiera en el passé de todos los graduados de licenciatura de Artes Liberales.

PS_april2017_44

Vista de exhibición, Dancing on Graves, Steven Parrino. The Power Station, Dallas, TX. Cortesía de The Power Station.

Esto se puede enfatizar con su elogio para un amigo, 13 Shattered Panels (for Joey Ramone) de 2001. Observando la cuenta de Instagram de la institución, se puede ver al director de The Power Station, Gregory Ruppe y al artista conceptual italiano, Piero Golia (quien estaba en la ciudad para la Feria de Arte de Dallas) tomando turnos para golpear con un bat de baseball las pinturas de esmalte negro. Post-mortem, en el segundo piso del museo, las pinturas descansan erguidas, lado a lado, a veces apiladas. Los fragmentos y materiales yacen como partes del cuerpo en un campo de batalla. Los escombros en el suelo desempeñan un papel similar al del recurso poético conocido como “pillow word” (una frase para denotar una ruptura) o el recurso de filmación, “pillow shot” (un corte a un farol o atardecer después de una intensa sección de diálogo). Estas funciones narrativas lingüísticas y estéticas significan pausas para la mediación, rupturas entre la acción que permiten al espectador reflexionar sobre lo que acaba de ver. Por lo general se sitúan entre “lo que era” y “lo que será” dentro de la historia. Los trozos del panel mutilado, encontrados a veces con tal violencia que vuelven a sus orígenes de polvo y arena, sirven como “pillow markings“, momentos de pausa para evitar que nos enfoquemos en gestos, sino que contemplemos nuestra propia complicidad en la violencia de la sociedad y el yo.

3 Units of Aluminum Death Shifter, de 1992, cuelga en el segundo piso como un descendiente directo de John Chamberlin – si el artista hubiera jugado con sábanas. Esta obra trae a la mente el lenguaje utilizado en películas de acción y mafia sobre preparar la propia muerte (“Has hecho tu cama, ahora yace en ella”). Es una prosa hiper masculina que cuando se contrasta con la elección de materiales de Parrino, da lugar a una lectura texturizada del sitio donde su práctica encaja: entre la abstracción que le precedió y el fatalismo de la era de los años 2000, aquella de los artistas neoyorquinos que trabajaban en  técnica mixta inspirados por el vicio. El esmalte sobre las obras en lienzo revela la escena de tres crímenes, o al menos esa es mi interpretación. Las tres formas de color alumínico delinean manchas de formas humanas. Los pliegues y arrugas de esta pieza son ásperos e implacables, presionados hacia el lienzo con ferocidad, o tal vez hechos para aparentarlo. Sin embargo, la abnegación es palpable. De inmediato, Parrino rechaza todo y nada dentro del campo de la pintura.

PS_april2017_39

Vista de exhibición, Dancing on Graves, Steven Parrino. The Power Station, Dallas, TX. Cortesía de The Power Station.

Por su simple estructura y nombre, el Power Station dota de ornamentación al mito de Parrino. Su gran arquitectura industrial hace que el nihilismo de las pinturas se extienda a través de sus niveles. Podría ser fácilmente el sitio de un espectáculo de noise de 1980 (o de la actualidad), un escenario que se produce a través de la propia entropía del espectáculo y por medio de la instalación, Dancing on Graves (1999), el video de cinco minutos del cual la exhibición toma su título. Un pequeño monitor se encuentra junto a dos altavoces pequeños y tres paneles negros rotos y mezclados. La pieza de video es una amalgama de sexo y terror. De las imágenes granuladas vemos a una mujer mirándonos, bailando sobre materiales similares mientras coquetea, quizás burlándose de nosotros. El ruido se enciende en los altavoces, llamándonos desde la tumba. Entonces vemos a Parrino proporcionando castigo sobre sus obras, luego oscuridad, seguida de ausencia. Parece que a través de sus experimentos con el noise, Parrino encontró que el silencio puede ser aniquilador.

 

Lee Escobedo es crítico, curador y artista. Su trabajo puede ser encontrado en Berlin Art Link, ArtDesk, Glasstire y The Dallas Morning News. En 2017 fue el co-programador de Artist Circle en el Nasher Sculpture Center y ha sido invitado por el Museo de Arte Moderno de Fort Worth, la Feria de Arte de Dallas y la Universidad Metodista Sureña a curar o programar. Vive y trabaja en Dallas, Texas.

Tags: , , , , , ,

K.i beyoncé & The Shabaka Stone

Fuckin’ Fruit

The Recorder Was Left On, Or The Closer I Get To The End The More I Rewrite The Beginning

En tránsito