Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Where tears come from

By Xavier Acarín

Xavier Acarín and Trajal Harrell discuss the multiple performance traditions that inform Harrell’s dance practice.

Xavier Acarín y Trajal Harrell hablan sobre las múltiples tradiciones de performance que informan la práctica de danza de Harrell.

4

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Photo by Orpheas Emirzas. Courtesy of the artist.

Xavier Acarín: Terremoto’s current issue “Eternal Life,” explores the connections between contemporary performance, spirituality, and ancient traditions. With this in mind, could you talk about how your choreographies relate to the ritualistic and the ceremonial? How do you consider the ways rituals link mythological origins with the present, breaking with the usual time flow, and creating new bonds or understandings of the self? To what extent do your pieces function as rituals?

Trajal Harrell: Performance is always at some level a ritual, the medium contains a sense of gathering people at an appointed time in a particular space. In my work I take a lot of inspiration from ancient Greek theater, which included many ritualistic traditions. My recent piece The Return of La Argentina is perhaps the most ritualistic, and this is a period of my work where I am looking to the modern Japanese dance theater of butoh through the theoretical lenses of the modern dance of vogue or voguing that evolved from the Harlem ballroom scene, and looking at modern dance through the theoretical lenses of butoh. Of course butoh, as a dance practice took a lot of its source material from Japanese folk traditions, rituals, and shamanistic practices. As well, recent research shows how butoh was extremely influenced by Katherine Dunham, and her work on vodun. In The Return of La Argentina, I attempt to archive another piece, that of Admiring La Argentina by Kazuo Ohno which was directed by Tatsumi Hijikata. I only perform the piece as a ritual. There are certain elements that need to be invoked in order for the piece to be actualized.

8

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Photo by Orpheas Emirzas. Courtesy of the artist.

XA: You have worked with historical precedents such as the Judson Church crowd, the Harlem voguing scene, and more recently with Dominique Bagouet. In approaching these research projects and collaborations, do you feel like a medium? Someone who canalizes energy to re-perform, re-actualize it, perpetuating a spirit, expanding the past into the present. How and why do you work with history?

TH: I’m interested in the historical imagination as a tool that creates possibilities. It is one of the things art can do. It can help us to overcome the things we think are impossible. Going into the cracks and fissures of history is one of the ways in which we can begin to uncover new kinds of possibilities in the world, because we know that history is not necessarily the most truthful, the most real, nor the most accurate story. I try to empower the historical imagination and that has been a part of my practice since 2001 when I started looking at the relationship between voguing and early postmodern dance. In a way, I employ history as a tool to get into the present and engage the audience in a proposition for a historical impossibility that creates togetherness and propels spectators into the now.

5

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Photo by Orpheas Emirzas. Courtesy of the artist.

XA: A very distinctive element of your performances is the use and presence of clothing. The clothes that you and your performers wear are very specific. They function as the wardrobe for a ceremony, something that provokes performativity. As a viewer, I see a reciprocity between the piece of clothing and the performer that stimulates a co-definition, evoking otherness, and articulating difference. (M)imosa was particularly fantastic in such an endeavor. While clothing has always been essential to theater and performance, I wonder if you have other references from the visual arts that you consider?

TH: This came out from my research on the fashion spectacle and its development initially in the court of Louis XIV, the same court where ballet came from. I was looking at this from the perspective of voguing and their appropriation of fashion spectacle and language. This became an architectural strategy in the work as I was also working with pedestrianism, and thinking about the idea of realness in voguing. This theme is now hyper-developed in my work and has become relevant in many of my projects. One of my references is the designer Rei Kawakubo, whose work I think relates to Japanese culture and artistic forms and re-thinks the female form, femininity, objectification, and sexuality through clothing. In all of my shows there’s a fashion runway going on, it’s part of the architectural space of the work. And of course, fashion is connected to cultural rituals, to commercialization, and to our pedestrian display of the body. All of this together produces a very contemporized form of the ritual.

img_1344

Trajal Harrell, In the Mood for Frankie, Museum of Modern Art, 2016. Photo by Paula Court. Courtesy of the artist.

XA: We could say similar things of your sets. When I last saw you perform In the Mood for Frankie at MoMA,you used the corridor near the elevators, a transit space daily crossed by hundreds of visitors. Your performances were at night—I saw the 11:30 pm show—and at that time MoMA has a different feeling. That area of New York seems weirdly empty on a Saturday night. The performance itself was rich with historical and aesthetic references that contributed to a ghostly presence. I felt the space was designed to make us feel a specific sense of intimacy, like a séance to invoke spirits. How did you design that space? There was a carpeted floor prop that was particularly haunting; it was more than a prop that marked a score for movement, it worked as an energetic device.

TH: All of this work came out of my research on Butoh and the first piece I did at MoMA in 2013 which was Used, Abused, and Hung Out to Dry. On that occasion the audience was asked to leave their shoes in the area that we now used for In the Mood for Frankie. I thought it was an interesting way to work with performance in the museum in a space that was not designed for this purpose. It was specially opposing the huge atrium upstairs, which is a very visible and grand space for performance. So, I chose a space that is very difficult for performance. I made this piece in India, working on the theme of muses. Working in the studio in Delhi, I wanted to make a piece that came out of all the inspirations and muses that were related to this research. So, I wanted to go to the studio and see how all these references appeared, figures such as Rei Kawakubo, Wong Kar Wai, Katherine Dunham, Kazuo Ohno, Tatsumi Hijikata, and Yoko Ashikawa. I was very aware of making a mix of folk and contemporary, similar to butoh’s mix of references to the ritualistic and the ceremonial, but was also thinking about sculptural and installation practices. So the kind of materials that attracted me were coming from a variety of places in Delhi, from vintage stores, to street markets, and I knew they were going to be juxtaposed to the projections on the platforms.

img_1704

Trajal Harrell, In the Mood for Frankie, Museum of Modern Art, 2016. Photo by Paula Court. Courtesy of the artist.

I am very interested in the original impact of butoh and how it relates to taboo and the radicalized violence that it created when it entered the world. Of course, I can only read about it and imagine. So it is a historical impossibility and I am investing myself in recreating this impact of butoh, but I can never really complete the action. All the things you mentioned exemplify my way of thinking about the aesthetic potentialities that I am invoking in the work. But they are not so strategic. I work with what I am attracted to, I am aware of the oppositions, and I am problematizing my own “orientalism.” For the project, I was particularly invested in creating an installation as a sculptural stage for dance. For the first time I wanted to make just a dance because I have been working with a lot of complex performative structures in my projects, and this time I wanted to evoke a very specific feeling from dance alone. No singing, no theater script, and no words. In Delhi you can be in a very rural space and then within a few feet, a contemporary setting, and I wanted to work with this juxtaposition. Some of the materials like the tapestries and the rugs come from there. I wanted these materials and this kind of space hovering between historical and cultural temporalities to hold this dance. Somehow I imagine this as connected to the original impact of butoh, though it’s only a feeling I have, which is not based at all on trying to imitate those original works.

9

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Photo by Orpheas Emirzas. Courtesy of the artist.

XA: Your work has contributed to challenging the canon derived from the Judson Church (or at least Yvonne Rainer’s version of the Judson Church) by introducing emotions and realness. Your work engages contemporary dance with other narratives—for instance, the way voguing provides a vivid lens through which to consider intersecting issues of gender, class and race. In turn your compositions appear to be using typical post-modern tools, such as deconstruction, alternative histories, appropriation, multiplicity of references, while you have also emphasized research as a way of working. How do you usually work and compose? Is it possible to articulate a method? Is this an intuitional process? How much of this is serendipity and how much of serendipity is magical?

TH: I always say that I don’t know how to make the dance. I was just co-teaching with Anri Sala in Vienna and one of the things we connected over was the idea of beginning again. When I go to the studio, it’s like starting over. I don’t know—there’s an impetus of doing something that I don’t necessarily know how to do or that I am confused about. When I start there is some knowledge that leads me from point A to point B to point C to point D, and I keep going, but I don’t have a method. There are certain things that return, like the architecture of the fashion runway, but each time the impetus and the ways to activate the space and the choreographies are different. Yes, a lot of it is intuition and serendipity. Performance is how I can get people to glimpse this togetherness, and I feel there is magic in that because it is so rare that a group of people can get into the now together, so it is very special. When we evoke presence we evoke magic; but not magic in the sense of creating something that is not there. There is magic found in homing in on what is extremely present and concrete. It is not about ghosts, it’s about living life, being in the now. There are so many distractions that keep us from this presence, but when such focus is realized, it can be very powerful for the performance. We are always working towards this state in our performances, and I think it is what attracts people. All the elements you talk about contribute to bringing people together in a special space and time. The question is “how can you make it happen?” For me, togetherness is always the central question of my craft.

16

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Photo by Orpheas Emirzas. Courtesy of the artist.

When my work came to visibility I was working with emotions and tears, and it was a taboo at the time. Often I think about this, because I don’t know where the tears come from when I’m performing. As an artist, I don’t try to know everything, I don’t want to know, I want to give space to the spectators and they can complete the work when we perform it together. Interconnectedness activates the performance and also relates back to ritual.

XA: Could we speculate about the connections between contemporary performance and dance with the choreographies of spiritualists and occultist sects that were loosely based on ancient Babylonian, Egyptian, and Greek rituals later adapted by seventeenth century European spiritualists, through the nineteenth century and beyond? Some of these features might appear very clearly in performance, for instance drawing a connection between body, self, and soul, or employing movement as ritualistic repetition or trance. This also means eliminating the status of audience, as everybody is involved in the ritual, there is no spectatorship. It also means creating hybrids that go beyond the modern divisions of human/non-human.

6

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Photo by Orpheas Emirzas. Courtesy of the artist.

TH: Well, I am not a specialist on these issues. I make very specific propositions to myself and while I am very connected to ancient Greek theater, I don’t try to re-invoke those practices. I am more interested in bringing the aesthetic elements together to make something very contemporary, and then there are the conditions that bring the performance into the now. My interest in Greek theater is based in its influence as the foundation of Western theater, and some of its characteristics are especially interesting: men played male and female roles, which I connect to voguing, and also it was a highly politicized form, in addition to being ritualistic and Dionysian; in its origins it was an invocation of the Gods. That said, I think that the most spiritual is the most concrete, and that is the energy of the now. I’m trying to get people to connect with the person sitting beside them. It is not the extraordinary, it is the very ordinary and recognizable things that we often ignore.

 

4

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Fotografía: Orpheas Emirzas. Cortesía del artista.

De donde vienen las lágrimas

Xavier Acarín: La edición actual de Terremoto, “La Vida Eterna”, explora las conexiones entre el performance contemporáneo, la espiritualidad y las tradiciones antiguas. Con esto en mente, ¿podrías hablar de cómo tus coreografías se relacionan con el ritual y la ceremonia? ¿Cómo consideras la forma en que los rituales conectan orígenes mitológicos con el presente, rompiendo con el flujo temporal habitual y creando nuevos lazos o entendimientos del individuo? ¿En qué medida crees que tus piezas funcionan como rituales?

Trajal Harrell: El performance es siempre a cierto nivel un ritual, reúne gente a una hora determinada en un espacio particular. En mi trabajo me inspiro mucho del teatro griego antiguo, que tiene una gran cantidad de tradiciones rituales. Mi pieza reciente The Return of La Argentina es quizás la más ritualista, es un momento en mi trabajo en donde estoy mirando al Butoh a través del lente teórico del voguing y mirando a la danza moderna a través del lente teórico del Butoh. Por supuesto, el Butoh como práctica de danza tomó una gran cantidad de material de las tradiciones japonesas populares, los rituales y las prácticas chamánicas. Además, investigaciones recientes demuestran que el Butoh fue muy influenciado por Katherine Dunham y su trabajo sobre el voodun. En The Return of La Argentina intento archivar otra pieza, Admiring La Argentina de Kazuo Ohno, que fue dirigida por Tatsumi Hijikata. Yo sólo interpreto las piezas en forma de ritual. Hay algunos elementos que deben ser invocados para que la pieza sea actualizada. 

8

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Fotografía: Orpheas Emirzas. Cortesía del artista.

XA: Has trabajado con precedentes históricos como el grupo del Judson Church, la escena del voguing de Harlem, o más recientemente, con Dominique Bagouet. Al abordar a estas figuras, ¿te sientes como un medium? ¿Alguien que canaliza una energía para re-interpretar, re-actualizar, perpetuar un espíritu, expandiendo el pasado en nuestro presente? ¿Cómo y por qué trabajas con la historia?

TH: Me interesa la imaginación histórica como una herramienta que crea posibilidades. Es una de las cosas que puede hacer el arte; nos puede ayudar a superar las cosas que creemos imposibles. Entrar en las grietas y fisuras de la historia es una de las formas en que podemos empezar a descubrir nuevas posibilidades en el mundo, pues sabemos que la historia no es necesariamente el más verdadero ni el más real ni preciso relato. Trato de potenciar la imaginación histórica y eso ha sido parte de mi práctica desde 2001, cuando empecé a mirar la relación entre el voguing y la danza posmoderna temprana. En cierto modo, uso la historia como una herramienta para entrar en el presente y atraer a la audiencia en una propuesta –una imposibilidad histórica, que crea una unión, impulsándolos hacia el presente.

5

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Fotografía: Orpheas Emirzas. Cortesía del artista.

XA: Un elemento muy característico de tus performances es la presencia y el uso del vestuario. La ropa que tú y tus intérpretes usan es muy específica; funciona como el ajuar para una ceremonia, algo que provoca la “performatividad.” Como espectador, veo una reciprocidad entre el vestuario y el intérprete que estimula una identificación, evocando así la alteridad, articulando la diferencia. (M)imosa era particularmente fantástica en este sentido. Mientras que el vestuario siempre ha sido esencial para el teatro y la actuación, ¿me pregunto si hay otras referencias en las artes visuales que tomes en cuenta?

TH: Esto viene de mi investigación sobre el espectáculo de moda y su desarrollo inicial en la corte de Luis XIV, la misma corte de donde surgió el ballet. Yo estaba mirando esto desde el punto de vista del voguing y su apropiación del espectáculo y el lenguaje de la moda. Esto se convirtió en una estrategia arquitectural en la obra, ya que también estaba trabajando con el pedestrianism (antecedente de la marcha rápida en Inglaterra) y pensando en lo real (realness) en el voguing. Esto se ha hiper-desarrollado en mi trabajo y se ha vuelto relevante en muchos proyectos. Una de mis referencias es la diseñadora Rei Kawakubo, pues su trabajo se relaciona con formas culturales y artísticas japonesas, repensando la forma femenina, la feminidad, la objetivación y la sexualidad a través de la ropa. En todas mis presentaciones hay una pasarela de moda, es parte del espacio arquitectónico de la obra. Por supuesto, la moda está conectada a rituales culturales, a la comercialización y a nuestra exhibición del cuerpo. Todo esto es una forma muy contemporánea del ritual.

img_1344

Trajal Harrell, In the Mood for Frankie, Museo de Arte Moderno, 2016. Fotografía: Paula Court. Cortesía del artista.

XA: Podríamos decir cosas similares respecto a tus escenarios. La última vez que te ví actuar en In the Mood for Frankie en el MoMA, utilizaste el pasillo cerca de los elevadores, un espacio de tránsito atravesado diariamente por cientos de visitantes. Tus performances fueron en la noche (yo ví el de las 11:30 pm) y en ese momento el MoMA da una sensación diferente. Esa área de Nueva York parece extrañamente vacía un sábado en la noche. El performance en sí era rico en referencias históricas y estéticas que contribuyeron a crear una presencia fantasmal. Me pareció que el espacio fue diseñado para darnos una sensación específica de intimidad, una sesión de invocación de espíritus. ¿Cómo diseñaste ese espacio? Había un suelo alfombrado particularmente inquietante –más que un accesorio que marcaba una puntuación para el movimiento, funcionó como un dispositivo energético.

TH: Todo este trabajo vino de mi investigación sobre el Butoh y la primera pieza que hice en el MoMA en 2013, Used, Abused, and Hung Out to Dry. En esa ocasión se le pidió al público que dejara sus zapatos en el área que ahora utilizamos para In the Mood for Frankie. Me pareció que era una forma interesante de trabajar con performance en el museo –en un espacio que no era diseñado para tal fin, especialmente en el lugar opuesto al enorme atrio en la parte de arriba, que es muy visible y amplio para el performance. Así que escogí ese espacio que es muy difícil. Hice esta pieza en la India, trabajando con el tema de las musas. Al trabajar en el estudio en Delhi, quería hacer una pieza que saliera de todas las fuentes de inspiración y musas que estaban de alguna manera relacionadas con esta investigación. Quería ir al estudio y ver cómo aparecían todas esas referencias, figuras como Rei Kawakubo, Wong Kar Wai, Katherine Dunham, Kazuo Ohno, Tatsumi Hijikata, Yoko Ashikawa. Yo era muy consciente de estar haciendo una mezcla de folk y contemporáneo, similar a la mezcla de referencias del Butoh, el ritual y la ceremonia, pero también pensando sobre la instalación y la escultura. Así que el tipo de materiales que traje provenían de una variedad de lugares en Delhi, desde lugares de usados hasta mercados callejeros, y yo sabía que iban a ser yuxtapuestos con las proyecciones en las plataformas.

img_1704

Trajal Harrell, In the Mood for Frankie, Museo de Arte Moderno, 2016. Fotografía: Paula Court. Cortesía del artista.

Estoy muy interesado en este impacto original del Butoh, cómo se relacionaba con el tabú, y la violencia radical que creó cuando entró en el mundo. Por supuesto, sólo puedo leer sobre él e imaginarlo. Así que es una imposibilidad histórica, y yo estoy comprometiéndome en recrear este impacto del Butoh, pero es un objetivo que nunca podré alcanzar realmente. Todas las cosas que mencionas son mi forma de pensar sobre las posibilidades estéticas que estoy invocando en el trabajo. Pero no son tan estratégicas; yo trabajo con lo que me atrae y soy consciente de las oposiciones y problematizo mi propio “orientalismo”. Yo estaba particularmente interesado en crear una instalación como un escenario escultórico para danza. Por primera vez quería hacer sólo una danza, pues he estado trabajando en una gran cantidad de estructuras performativas complejas en mis proyectos, y esta vez quería evocar una sensación muy específica solamente desde la danza. Sin canto, sin guión teatral, sin palabras. En Delhi se puede estar en un espacio muy rural y luego a pocos metros, en un entorno contemporáneo, y yo quería trabajar con esta yuxtaposición. Algunos de los materiales como los tapices o algunas de las alfombras provienen de allí. Yo quería que estos materiales y este tipo de espacio se cernieran entre temporalidades históricas y culturales para sostener esta danza. De alguna manera relaciono esto con el impacto original del Butoh, aunque es sólo un sentimiento que tengo –no se basa en absoluto en tratar de imitar esa producción original.

9

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Fotografía: Orpheas Emirzas. Cortesía del artista.

XA: Tu trabajo ha contribuido a desafiar el canon derivado de la Judson Church (o al menos la versión de la Judson Church de Yvonne Rainer) mediante la introducción de las emociones y el carácter real (realness). Comprometes la danza contemporánea con otras narrativas, por ejemplo, la manera en que el voguing provee un lente vívido a través del cual considerar intersecciones entre cuestiones de género, clase y raza. A su vez, tus composiciones parecen estar utilizando herramientas típicas postmodernas como la deconstrucción, las historias alternativas, la apropiación, la multiplicidad de referencias, y también has enfatizado en la investigación como una forma de trabajo. ¿Cómo trabajas y compones habitualmente? ¿Es posible articular un método? ¿Es éste un proceso intuitivo? ¿Cuánto de esto es serendipia y qué parte de la serendipia es mágica?

TH: Yo siempre digo que no sé cómo hacer danza. Acabo de estar enseñando junto con Anri Sala en Viena, y una de las cosas en que nos conectamos fue en esta idea de comenzar de nuevo. Cuando voy al estudio, es así. No sé, hay un impulso de hacer algo que no necesariamente sé cómo hacer o que me confunde. Cuando empiezo hay cierto conocimiento que me lleva del punto A al punto B al punto C al punto D, y sigo adelante, no tengo un método. Hay algunas cosas que regresan, como la arquitectura de la pasarela de moda, pero cada vez el ímpetu y las formas de activar el espacio y las coreografías son diferentes. Sí, mucho de ello es intuición y serendipia. El performance es una manera de conseguir que todos entren en esta unidad, y yo siento que hay algún tipo de magia en eso pues es tan raro que un grupo de personas puedan entrar en el ahora juntos, y eso es muy especial. Cuando evocamos esa presencia es un poco mágico, pero no creo que sea mágico en el sentido de crear algo que no está allí. Es una magia en la que apuntas hacia lo que está extremadamente allí, presente y concreto. No se trata de fantasmas, se trata de estar en la vida, en el ahora. Hay tantas distracciones que nos alejan de esta presencia, y pienso que cuando ella se logra, el performance puede ser muy poderoso. Ese es el esfuerzo que siempre estamos haciendo en nuestros performances, y creo que es lo que atrae a la gente. Todos los elementos que mencionas contribuyen a acercar a la gente en un espacio y tiempo muy especial. La cuestión es ¿cómo se puede hacer que suceda? Para mí, esta unión es siempre el tema central de mi oficio.

16

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Fotografía: Orpheas Emirzas. Cortesía del artista.

Cuando mi trabajo empezó a tener visibilidad yo estaba trabajando con emociones y lágrimas y en ese moment eso era un tabú. A menudo pienso en esto, pues yo no sé de dónde vienen las lágrimas cuando estoy actuando. Como artista, no intento saber todo, no quiero saber, quiero dar espacio a los espectadores, ellos completan el trabajo cuando hacemos el performance juntos. Esa interconexión que activa el performance también tiene cierta relación con el ritual.

XA: ¿Podríamos especular sobre las conexiones entre el performance y la danza contemporáneos y las coreografías de los espiritistas y sectas ocultistas europeos del s. 17 al 19, que se basaban libremente en antiguos rituales babilónicos, egipcios y griegos? Algunas de estas características podrían aparecer muy claramente en el performance actual, por ejemplo, al hacer una conexión entre el cuerpo, el ser y el alma; o empleando el movimiento como repetición ritual o trance, eliminando el estatus de la audiencia en la medida en que todo el mundo participa en el ritual, así que no hay espectador; o en la creación de híbridos que van más allá de las divisiones modernas humano / no humano.

6

Trajal Harrell, The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai, 2015. Fotografía: Orpheas Emirzas. Cortesía del artista.

TH: Bueno, yo no soy un especialista en estos temas. Me hago propuestas muy concretas a mí mismo, y aunque estoy muy conectado con el teatro griego antiguo, no intento volver a invocar esas prácticas. Estoy más interesado en juntar esos elementos estéticos para hacer algo muy contemporáneo y luego están las condiciones que traen el performance al presente. Mi interés por el teatro griego se basa en su influencia como fundamento del teatro occidental y algunas de sus características resultan especialmente interesantes: los hombres jugaban papeles masculinos y femeninos, lo que yo conecto con el voguing; así mismo, el teatro era una forma altamente politizada, también ritualista y dionisíaca, en sus orígenes era una invocación de los dioses. Dicho esto, creo que lo más espiritual es lo más concreto, y esa es la energía en el ahora. Estoy tratando de lograr que la gente se conecte con la persona sentada a su lado, no se trata de algo extraordinario. Se trata de algo muy ordinario y reconocible, que a menudo ignoramos.

 

 

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Micromegas

No Man’s Land

Relación abierta

Lo que flota en el mar