Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Milena Bonilla

By Natalia Valencia

Milena Bonilla and Natalia Valencia discuss the inscription of political contexts in animal behaviour and the politics of chocolate readings.

Milena Bonilla y Natalia Valencia hablan sobre la inscripción de contextos políticos en el comportamiento animal y sobre las políticas de la lectura del chocolate.

until-68

An Enchanted Forest, 2013 – 2014. HD Video 9’ 15”, 16 photographs, 29.7 x 21 cm. Mixed media

NV: Your project Un Bosque Encantado (An Enchanted Forest) takes place in the ancient Bohemian Forest, which before 1989 was divided between the Bavarian Forest Nature Park that now belongs to Germany, and the Šumava National Park that is now part of the Czech Republic. The piece explores a biological phenomenon discovered by a group of scientists led by Marco Heurich between 2002 and 2009. They found that the females of the native species of red deer have never crossed the now invisible Iron Curtain that went through there, even after the physical structure was removed in 1989. You propose the hypothesis that these deer are actually avatars of an anarchist animal movement. Can you explain how you came to imagine this scenario where the political context is inscribed in the animals’ behavior?

We-Are-Ahornia

An Enchanted Forest, 2013 – 2014. HD Video 9’ 15”, 16 photographs, 29.7 x 21 cm. Mixed media

MB: I think my intention is to present parallel worlds within predetermined forms of a general understanding of history. The deer as avatar is important within the narrative, but its image in the project disappears, only its traces remain, expressed through the conversation with Marco, and in the anarchists’ declarations. This suggests different possibilities that can open up between the animal kingdom and history, between the definitions of authority of some entities regarding others, and between the biological and the social worlds as profoundly connected spheres. I don’t consider the anarchist group as something natural, necessarily, but as a possible parallel reality, juxtaposed with a series of evidences discovered through scientific methodologies.

We-all-see-power

An Enchanted Forest, 2013 – 2014. HD Video 9’ 15”, 16 photographs, 29.7 x 21 cm. Mixed media

NV: How do you interpret the idea of anachronism, as understood from a political aspect, in nature?

MB: To start, I will use an example from Kafka’s short story, “A Report to an Academy” from 1917. When the protagonist, an ape named Red Peter, tells to the honorable members of the academy the story of how he managed to become human, he makes a cautionary note about the fact that everything he tells in his story related to the time when he had not yet mastered his speaking abilities, (i.e. before becoming human)  should be taken with a grain of salt. What is communicated through human language cannot precisely express his previous experience as an animal. The moment Peter begins to talk, the universe of immanence in which he was  before shuts in front of his eyes forever. By entering language, the animal is sacrificed, as the use of language grants him agency and “legalizes” him in front of the human sphere.

On the other hand, the history of Western legal systems is full of cases where self consciousness is “granted” to the animal; by those means, during certain animal trials, the beast “could” represent itself  (sometimes supported by a human defense) even though it could not speak. As an example I can recall the story of a group of locusts that were condemned for eating a crop, and eventually were kicked out of the town in which the trial took place. Or, after a few days in court, a cat was sent to the gallows for killing his neighbor’s chickens in cold blood. All of this happened within a legal framework of  prosecutors, witnesses, defense and judge. As far as I know, these rather local cases where common in Europe and some parts of the Americas until the early XX century.
Nowadays, the position of the law in regards to what is generally understood as nature is way more complicated, I would say, since large bodies/entities like the oceans, forests, savannas, or entire populations of certain animals are brought into the legal system along with a human representative that speaks for them. This does not happen in front of an excited and reduced crowd of witnesses looking for some punishment –as in the aforementioned smaller trials of the locusts and the cat– but in front of a body of powerful corporations (also represented by humans) from which nature should be protected.

 

Intervention in auditoriums Sound installation, kentia palms, turntables, poster, sound 24’ Publication size 14.8 x 21 x 0.7 cm. 2012 2010 - 2012

A report to an academy.Intervention in auditoriums. Sound installation, Kentia palms, turntables, poster, sound 24’. Publication size 14.8 x 21 x 0.7 cm. 2012 2010 – 2012

 

A report to an academy. Intervention in auditoriums. Sound installation, Kentia palms, turntables, poster, sound 24’. Publication size 14.8 x 21 x 0.7 cm. 2012 2010 – 2012

NV: You have been working lately with the notion of scrying or divination by ancient methods involving biological elements, such as the chocolate reading project that you develop in collaboration with Luisa Ungar. This form of reading opens up a channel to interpret a natural “other” (in this case, cocoa) that transmits politically charged messages. Given that this is a form of interruption or hybridization of rational thought by means of a divinatory process that is governed by other parameters, how do you reconcile these forms of knowledge?

10403766_10152695157475202_1880171781047017439_o

This Rabbit Looks to the Left: Chocolate Scrying. 2014 – 2015. Performance, collaboration with Luisa Ungar. Documentation of a Performance at Rong Wrong, Amsterdam. 

10524592_10152695156330202_5008200287643276875_o (1)

This Rabbit Looks to the Left: Chocolate Scrying. 2014 – 2015. Performance, collaboration with Luisa Ungar. Documentation of a Performance at Rong Wrong, Amsterdam.

MB: What we do is track histories, anecdotes, images, remnants of the cocoa that become a constellation, a playground— if the reading permits. Thus we refer to ways of working with narratives and mapping that we have individually elaborated by different means and that now converse in the project. The images work as orientation tools in these relationships. We don’t see this as reconciliation, but as a way to contrast and weave these forms of knowledge. In fact, these crossovers happen in different ways in each reading, because they are sensitive to the people we are reading with, and also ourselves.
We are interested in the accidents that appear throughout, when the others in the group intervene, generating a certain type of conversation, playing with the images that emerge in the process. On the other hand, the reading releases an energy that is not controlled by anyone in the group. This helps us in thinking about the narcotic effect of the plant and its relationship to different affects — how we can be in dialogue with that manifestation of energy that is constantly opposing the productivity margin and the contemporary consumer culture in which the plant is inscribed.

Natalia Valencia: Some crows from Ajusco told me that you are very interested in the lives of their Parisian cousins. What do you talk to them about?

Milena Bonilla: Hmm, I don’t talk with them, but they manifest things that I try to read. I have to do these exercises very early or very late, because the street is too noisy during the rest of the day. I connect them and their squawks to forms of political organization, surveillance, and control of resources, affections and opportunistic actions.
More specifically, what I want is for them to bring me news from a chef that opened a successful restaurant during the Paris Commune in 1871, where the elaborated forms of haute cuisine were balanced by using ordinary street animals as ingredients, crows being amongst the few animals that were not included in the recipes. Weird, isn’t it? How does this sound: le chat flanqué de rats aux croutons…? 

Milena Bonilla (1975) was born in Bogotá, Colombia, she lives and works in Amsterdam. Her work has been exhibited at The Mistake Room, Los Angeles (2015); CA2M, Madrid (2015); Bonneffantenmuseum, Maastricht (2014); CIFO, Miami (2013); Frieze’s Frame solo projects, London (2012), Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Sevilla, Spain (2012); 12th Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul, Turkey (2011); SKMU Sørlandets Kunstmuseum, Kristiansand, Norway (2011); Rijksakademie Open, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2009-2010), Witte de With, Rotterdam, The Netherlands (2010); 10th Havana Biennial, Havana, Cuba (2009); and 3th Bucharest Biennial, Bucharest, Romania (2008) among others.

Natalia Valencia (b. 1984, Bogotá) is an independent curator based in Mexico City. She has curated exhibitions at Palais de Tokyo in Paris, Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros in Mexico City, L’appartement 22 in Rabat, Morocco, Museo Quinta de Bolívar in Bogotá, Proyectos Ultravioleta in Guatemala. In 2013 she worked as fellow researcher of Latin American art at the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

until-68

An Enchanted Forest (Un bosque encantado), 2013 – 2014. Video HD, 9’ 15”, 16 fotografías, 29.7 x 21 cm. Técnica mixta.

NV: Tu proyecto “Un Bosque Encantado” ocurre en el antiguo bosque de Bohemia, que estaba dividido, antes de 1989, entre el Parque Natural Bavario, actualmente perteneciente a Alemania y el Parque Natural Šumava, ahora perteneciente a la República Checa. La pieza explora un fenómeno biológico descubierto por un grupo de científicos liderado por Marco Heurich, entre 2002 y 2009. Ellos encontraron que las hembras de la especie nativa de venados rojos, hasta el día de hoy no cruzan la -ahora invisible- cortina de hierro que pasaba por ahí, aún cuando la cerca física fue retirada en 1989. Tú planteas la hipótesis de que estos venados son en realidad avatares de un movimento anarquista “natural”. ¿Puedes explicar cómo llegaste a imaginar este escenario en el que la coyuntura política se inscribe en el comportamiento animal?

We-Are-Ahornia

An Enchanted Forest (Un bosque encantado), 2013 – 2014. Video HD, 9’ 15”, 16 fotografías, 29.7 x 21 cm. Técnica mixta.

MB: Creo que la intención va por el lado de presentar mundos paralelos dentro de una forma predeterminada de entender la historia como un “valor nominal”. El venado como avatar me parece importante dentro de la narración pero no como símbolo, por eso desaparece en el proyecto, sólo quedan sus huellas, expresadas tanto en la conversación con Marco, como en las declaraciones de los anarquistas. Eso deja un espacio para pensar en diferentes posibilidades que se abren entre el mundo animal y la historia, entre las definiciones de autoridad de unas entidades con respecto a otras y entre el mundo biológico y el social como esferas abiertas y profundamente conectadas. Yo no planteo el grupo anarquista como algo “natural” necesariamente, sino como un paralelo “posible” ante unas evidencias demostradas con herramientas científicas.

We-all-see-power

An Enchanted Forest (Un bosque encantado), 2013 – 2014. Video HD, 9’ 15”, 16 fotografías, 29.7 x 21 cm. Técnica mixta.

NV: ¿Cómo interpretas la idea de anacronismo -entendido desde su aspecto político- en la naturaleza?

MB: Voy a usar un ejemplo, y viene del cuento de Kafka “Un reporte para una academia”. Cuando el protagonista, el chimpancé Rotpeter o Pedro el Rojo le cuenta a los honorables miembros de la academia la historia de cómo logra convertirse en ser humano, hace una acotación sobre el hecho de que todo lo que cuenta en su historia relacionado al tiempo en el que no había dominado aún la capacidad de hablar, (es decir, antes de volverse humano), se debe tomar con sospecha, pues esa narración hecha por medio de la lengua humana no puede retomar con precisión o dar fe de su experiencia como animal. En el momento en que Pedro empieza a hablar, el universo de inmanencia en el que se encontraba anteriormente se cierra para siempre ante él. Entrar en el lenguaje significa el sacrificio al animal y la introducción de la nueva persona / ser humano en el mundo de la legalidad. Pero al tiempo, la historia del mundo legal está llena de casos en que, por ejemplo, a un grupo de langostas se las ha condenado por comerse una cosecha entera, indicándoles que no lo vuelvan a hacer; o a un gato se le ha condenado a la horca por comerse las gallinas del vecino después de varios días de juicio. Todo esto en un marco jurídico con fiscales, testigos, defensa y juez. Hasta donde yo sé, estos casos más bien locales eran comunes en Europa y varios lugares de las Américas hasta comienzos del siglo XX.

Hoy en día, la postura de la ley frente a lo que se entiende generalmente como naturaleza es mucho más compleja, dado que los cuerpos/entidades más grandes como los océanos, los bosques, las sabanas, o poblaciones enteras de animales se presentan ante el sistema legal junto a un representante humano que habla por ellos. Esto no ocurre frente a un público reducido de testigos que buscan castigo -como en los juicios antes mencionados de las langostas y el gato- sino frente a un cuerpo corporativo poderoso (también representado por humanos), del cual la naturaleza debe ser protegida.

Intervention in auditoriums Sound installation, kentia palms, turntables, poster, sound 24’ Publication size 14.8 x 21 x 0.7 cm. 2012 2010 - 2012

A report to an academy. Interveción en auditorios. Instalación de sonido, palmeras Kentia, tornamesas, poster, sonido 24′. Dimensiones publicación 14.8 x 21 x 0.7 cm. 2010 – 2012

Intervention in auditoriums Sound installation, kentia palms, turntables, poster, sound 24’ Publication size 14.8 x 21 x 0.7 cm. 2012 2010 - 2012

A report to an academy. Interveción en auditorios. Instalación de sonido, palmeras Kentia, tornamesas, poster, sonido 24′. Dimensiones publicación 14.8 x 21 x 0.7 cm. 2010 – 2012

NV: Ultimamente has trabajando la noción de “scrying” o divinancia a través de métodos antiguos que involucran elementos biológicos, como la lectura del chocolate, en un proyecto que haces con Luisa Ungar. Este medio de lectura abre un canal para interpretar a ese “otro” natural (el cacao en este caso) que transmite mensajes con una carga política. Dado que esta es una especie de interrupción de o hibridación del pensamiento racional con un proceso divinatorio que se rige por otros parámetros, ¿Cómo concilias estas maneras de conocimiento?

10403766_10152695157475202_1880171781047017439_o

This Rabbit Looks to the Left: Chocolate Scrying (Este conejo mira a la izquierda). 2014 – 2015. Performance, en colaboración con Luisa Ungar. Documentación de un performance en Rong Wrong, Amsterdam

10524592_10152695156330202_5008200287643276875_o (1)

This Rabbit Looks to the Left: Chocolate Scrying (Este conejo mira a la izquierda). 2014 – 2015. Performance, en colaboración con Luisa Ungar. Documentación de un performance en Rong Wrong, Amsterdam.

MB: Lo que hacemos es rastrear historias, anécdotas, imágenes, restos del cacao que se convierten en una constelación, un territorio para jugar –si la lectura lo permite. Así, retomamos formas de trabajar con narrativas y mapeos que cada una ha elaborado en medios distintos y que acá conversan. Las imágenes funcionan como herramientas de orientación en este estado de relaciones. No vemos esto como una conciliación sino como un contraste. En realidad los cruces se dan de formas distintas en cada lectura, porque son sensibles al tipo de personas con las que estamos leyendo y a nosotras mismas. Lo que también nos interesa son los accidentes que aparecen en el medio, las intervenciones de los demás, generar cierto tipo de conversación y jugar con las imágenes que van apareciendo. Por otro lado, con la lectura se libera un tipo de energía que nadie controla, y pues ahí nos interesa pensar en el aspecto narcótico de la planta y su relación con diferentes afectos; cómo se puede conversar con esa manifestación energética que al tiempo contrasta constantemente con el margen de “productividad” y consumo contemporáneos en los que la planta está inscrita.

Natalia Valencia: Me contaron unos cuervos del Ajusco que andas muy interesada en las vidas de sus primos parisinos. ¿De qué hablas con ellos?

Milena Bonilla: Mmm…yo no hablo con ellos, pero ellos manifiestan cosas que trato de leer. Esos ejercicios los tengo que hacer muy temprano y muy tarde pues durante el día hay demasiado ruido en la calle. Con ellos y sus graznidos conecto la relación entre formas políticas de organización, vigilancia y control de recursos, afectos y oportunismos.  Más específicamente, por ahora lo que quiero es que me traigan noticias de un chef que abrió un exitoso restaurante durante la Comuna de Paris (1871), en el que los manierismos de la haute-cuisine se balanceaban usando animales ordinarios de la calle como ingredientes –siendo los cuervos de los pocos animales a los que no incluyeron en sus recetas. ¿Raro, no? ¿Qué tal te suena: le chat flanqué de rats aux croutons…?

Milena Bonilla (1975, Bogotá) vive en Amsterdam. Su trabajo se ha presentado en espacios como: The Mistake Room, Los Angeles US (2015); MAMM, Medellín CO (2015); CA2M, Madrid ES (2015); Bonneffantenmuseum, Maastricht NL (2014), Rong Wrong, Amsterdam (2014); CIFO, Miami (2013); Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Sevilla ES (2012); 12 Bienal de Estambul, Estambul TR (2011); Witte de With, Rotterdam, Nl (2010); 10 Bienal de la Habana CU (2009); Casa Republicana de la BLAA, Bogotá CO (2008) y la Tercera Bienal de Bucarest, RO (2008) entre otros. Fue residente en la Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten en 2010.

Natalia Valencia (1984, Bogotá) es curadora independiente, vive en la Ciudad de México. Ha curado exposiciones en el Palais de Tokyo en Paris, Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros en México DF, L´appartement 22 en Rabat, Marruecos, Museo Quinta de Bolívar en Bogotá, Proyectos Ultravioleta en Guatemala. En el 2013 trabajó como investigadora de arte latinoamericano en el Centro Pompidou en Paris.

Tags: , , , ,

Estallar las apariencias

i am resuming my place at the top, by force, so suck it!

MD

Geometría primitiva