Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

How objects from processions turn into anthropological artifacts

by Tobi Maier

Starting from his research in the history of artists organizing processions and parades, the São Paulo based curator Tobi Maier asks: How do objects and costumes employed during these rituals move between the utilitarian and the symbolic? How do they mediate in public practice? What are these performative events leaving behind beyond their unique temporality?

Partiendo de su investigación sobre la historia reciente de ciertos artistas que organizan y participan en procesiones y desfiles, el curador basado en Sao Paulo Tobi Maier se pregunta por los objetos y vestimentas utilizados en estos rituales: ¿cómo se mueven entre lo utilitario y lo simbólico? ¿De qué forma actúan como mediadores en la esfera pública? ¿Que están dejando de lado estos eventos performativos, aparte de su temporalidad particular?

Super Abravana II

Ricardo Castro, Super Abravana II, 2008, performance, Ação Abravanada realizada em vários locais do centro da cidade de São Paulo, SP.

“I dream of the day when I shall create sculptures that breathe, perspire, cough, laugh, yawn, smirk, wink, pant, dance, walk, crawl…and move among people as shadows move along people”, the Filipino artist David Medalla once stated (1). It is this ambiguity between moving subjects and objects that interests me in the research on processions and parades organized by artists. How do subjects and objects merge while they are in process of activation and what stays behind after they have been employed for presentation, how are their “residues” presented within exhibitions and can they not only fail to convey the festive spirit they were supposed to carry, once they were taken from the street and into the exhibition space?

Abravanation Ipiranga

Ricardo Castro, Abravanation Ipiranga, 2005, performance, Ação Abravanada en colaboración con los artistas Lau Neves e Melissa Sguarizi, Av. Ipiranga, São Paulo, SP.

When I think of processions designed and organized by artists, it is not only the geographical and institutional contexts that ought to be considered, but also the level of engagement of the performers, the props and costumes designed for the occasion or the music that accompanies their ephemeral staging. It is about the ways by which visual artists reimagine street theatre and the dynamics of relationships between subjects and objects in space. French philosopher and anthropologist Bruno Latour says: “There is probably no more decisive difference among thinkers than the position they are inclined to take on space: Is space what inside which reside objects and subjects? Or is space one of the many connections made by objects and subjects?”(2) There seems to be a lot of thought going into the relationships that we as subjects retain with objects that surround us and that we carry through space.

Processions and parades, albeit ephemeral events, leave traces behind: objects or documentation. Most often these take the form of documents that were generated during a preparatory process (permits, correspondence, etc.) and lens based works such as video or photography that take on the role of documentation, up to an extent that the “photographic document is a replacement of the object or event” not merely a record of it, as curator Okwui Enwezor has stated in the catalogue text for his exhibition Archive Fever at ICP, New York, on view during 2008 (3).

While technology has enabled us to retrace the steps of ephemeral events in more detail, artists have become accustomed to produce immanent works from the transient. Art historians on the other hand have lamented the scarcity of documentation of some elements of Renaissance artists’ performance. Sir Kenneth Clark wrote, “In studying the architecture and even the painting of the Renaissance, we must always remember that one whole branch of each is almost completely lost to us—the architecture and decoration which was designed for pageants and masquerades.” Some attempts were made to create a record of these works, particularly triumphal processions honoring the mighty, in the form of commemorative books especially prepared for the occasion, which reproduced the principal motifs devised by the artists (4). This practice is not dissimilar today, even though we no longer speak of “commemorative books”, instead of artist’s publications, magazines or catalogues plus a wealth of online media that instantly feed us with images and video impressions from events around the globe. 

Arto Lindsay Parada pedra, 2013_photo by Ricardo Amado

Arto Lindsay, Parada Pedra, performance, 2013. Photo credit: Ricardo Amado.

What are artist’s considerations when thinking about the esthetics these “residues” (photos, or for that matter video, or costumes /dresses) leave behind in an exhibition space once the performance has ended? How does the work change, when it is not experienced first hand? I’ll concentrate here on recent performances by Arto Lindsay and Luisa Mota that I witnessed here in São Paulo and another one I worked on together with Brazilian artists f.marquespenteado in Torino.

One of the most active figures in the Brazilian art scene when it comes to processions has been musician and artist Arto Lindsay. In an extensive interview I conducted with him last year he stated, “when you parade for four or five hours, it’s a transformative experience, it’s ritualistic in the broadest sense of the term. You come out differently on the other side.”(5) Lindsay has conceived parades for Performa festival in New York, Portikus in Frankfurt am Main, the Venice Biennial, the carnival in Salvador da Bahia and during Art Basel Hong Kong. For São Paulo, Lindsay organized Parada Pedra during the 33rd Panorama (2013), the biannual exhibition of contemporary art that is organized by the Museu de Arte Moderna (MAM) in São Paulo. During the procession, which took place in the city center commercial passage Nova Brandão, participants carried scale models of stages and iconic houses, the Casa Malaparte (Capri) and Teatro Farnese (Parma). The curatorial idea behind the 33rd Panorama had been to reimagine a possible future for an itinerant MAM, an institution designed by Lina Bo Bardi and squeezed under an Oscar Niemeyer designed passage in São Paulo’s Ibirapuera Park. Thus Casa Malaparte and Teatro Farnese were representative for an utopian architecture that could host a new MAM and within this particular local context they were hinting towards a variety of abandoned iconic buildings in the city center that could be made fit to host exhibitions (Cine Marrocos and others around the Largo Paisandu neighborhood in downtown São Paulo). The performance with the main protagonists (the scaled down architectures from Capri and Parma) referred back to the bohemian past of São Paulo’s city center and its potential future. Once the performance ended the sculptures were put on display inside the museum. Few people however seemed to have understood their meaning, a wall text being the sole attempt to connect them to what only a small public had witnessed days before.

Arto Lindsay Parada pedra, 2013_photo2 by Ricardo Amado (2)

Arto Lindsay, Parada Pedra, desfile, 2013. Photo credit: Ricardo Amado.

AL2

Arto Lindsay, Parada Pedra, 2013. Maquetas de Casa Malaparte (Capri) y del Teatro Farnese (Parma) usadas en el desfile del día 19 de octubre de 2013, en la glaería Nova Barão, São Paulo, en el Museo Difuso y Urbano, del Ejecutado por Carla Zollinger; Asistentes: Acássio Murillo and Fábio Santos. Photo by Tobi Maier.

Luisa Mota sp1

Luisa Mota, Hombres invisibles, 2006, performance, São Paulo. Photos by Luisa Mota.

For the 2013 edition of the São Paulo performance annual festival Verbo, Portuguese artist Luisa Mota staged a procession entitled Invisible Men, departing from Galeria Vermelho and along Avenida Paulista. For Mota the medium of  “parade, the procession, the protest, a group of individuals walking, marching together is a powerful source of agglomerated faith/belief, energy on something that unites them into one. […] The fascinating aspect to me (says Mota) is that the material is alive and breathing, having a mind of their own and their own purpose, their own life […]. Together you create a choreography of symbols, a ritual, you begin to create a language that communicates a message to other people, because certainly people resonate something into one another.”(6) Mota makes no distinction between objects and documentation and states that she retains remnants, objects, costumes; that photos and videos are also to be understood as works, as anthropological artifacts, meant to be shown and used as such.

Luisa Mota sp3

Luisa Mota, Hombres invisibles, 2013, performance, São Paulo. Photos by Luisa Mota.

1013648_1034244939925196_779401499141056782_n

Rufos y bufos bloco, 2015. Photo credit: Cau and Rufos y Bufos.

Most recently Brazilian artist f.marquespenteado staged Three Novels (2014), a performance at Per4M, the inaugural performance section at Torino’s Artissima fair in November 2014. Three Novels presented fictional stories that involved three different men (Sean the writer, Jonas the photographer and Javier the architect), which are described through the lenses of a narrator (the artist himself), him being the three character’s ex-lover. Three Novels started with a short procession led by the artist himself continuously ringing a small crystal bell, followed by three actors (personifying the three lovers) who were carrying drawings and embroidered textile works from the booth of Mendes Wood DM gallery to a stage that hosted the Per4M section. Three panels had been installed there, which in a Warburgian fashion combined material collected by the artist over the last 20 years at London flea markets, or were culled from magazines, maps, catalogues and instruction manuals of all sorts. Depicting nature sceneries, literature covers (Wallace Hamilton’s Christoper and Gay: A Partisans View of the Greenwhich Village homosexual Scene, for example) or erotic photographs, these offerings were combined with drawings and hand written notes that together represented the universe of each one of the three lovers. Many of the works presented in Torino travelled to São Paulo after the performance and were presented in the homonymous exhibition at the gallery. Thus in these “highly authored”(7) performance projects, these ‘leftovers’ are carefully conceived in advance and often preserved for an afterlife (alongside documentation or not) in an exhibition context.

1378572_1034245723258451_4872399250941708049_n

Rufos y bufos bloco, 2015. Photo credit: Cau and Rufos y Bufos.

In other participatory projects – take the São Paulo carnival for example with its many artist conceived blocos – costumes and other elements are often created in collaboration and yet discarded after the actual event has taken place. For the collectively authored rufos Y bufos bloco a group of artists, designers, writers and architects met for a month in a city center apartment conceiving costumes and props, few of which survived the actual procession in early March 2015. Another example here would be Brazilian artist Ricardo Càstro’s series of ‘abravanaçoes’ events, for which the artist creates costumes and accessories from a palette of materials and colors, distributes them to friends and volunteer participants with whom they remain throughout the street processions and afterwards.

Abravanation Martin Francisco

Ricardo Castro, Abravanation Martin Francisco, 2006, performance, Ação Abravanada en colaboración con los artistas Renata Abbade, Calle Martin Francisco, São Paulo, SP.

The participatory walks organized by different artists here most importantly reflect an idea of playing the city, of activating and manifesting a presence in public space. Yet, it is an idea of play that is not naïve or innocent, rather one that is geared towards an active belief for engaging the other, experiences of walking that are not merely in tune with the Situationist idea of lone dérive, but constructed on concepts of agency.

This agency creates meaning and is built on each participant’s experiences in a collective effort of exchange. As the American philosopher John Dewey has noted: “for while the roots of every experience are found in the interaction of a live creature with its environment, that experience becomes conscious, a matter of perception, only when meanings enter it that are derived from prior experiences.(8)

Thus when walks and cartography projects carry an inherent semantic, corporal, tactile or visual component, an architectural framework or a socio-political agenda, they can engender meaning that helps us to depart from the representative question “Where do we come from?” to a participatory one, one that is geared towards the future namely: “Where are we going to?”

 

For Terremoto, São Paulo in May 2015


Notes:

(1) Signals 1, no. 8 (June-July 1965); reprinted in the catalogue When Attitudes Become Form, Kunsthalle Bern, 1969, unpaged
(2) Bruno Latour, Spheres and Networks: Two Ways to Reinterpret Globalization in Harvard Design Magazine 30, Spring/Summer 2009, p.142
(3) Enwezor, Okwui, Archive Fever, Uses of the Document in Contemporary Art, International Center of Photography, New York, Steidl, Goettingen, 2008, p.23 [accessed via http://bookchin.net/feeling/readings/photography_between_history.pdf]
(4) Gregory Battcock and Robert Nickas, (ed.) The Art of Performance, A Critical Anthology, 1984, p.15 (Renaissance performance art took most of its forms from the highly ritualized society of the Middle Ages when church processions and feudal formalities such as jousts were anonymously planned. Individualism was responsible for contaminating these forms with personal interpretations and for awakening a lust for fame that naturally led the men of an age obsessed with antiquity to those ancient metaphors for personal greatness, the triumph and its counterpart the triumphal arc. P.20)
(5)In ArtReview, London, September 2014, p.104ff
(6) Luisa Mota in email conversation with the author
(7) Claire Bishop Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship, London and New York: Verso, 2012 p.39
(8) Dewey J. in Ross, S. (ed.) Art and its Significance, New York: State University of New York Press, 1994, p.218

Super Abravana II

Ricardo Castro, Super Abravana II, 2008, performance, Ação Abravanada realizado en varias locaciones de la ciudad de São Paulo, SP.

Cómo los objetos utilizados en procesiones devienen en artefactos antropológicos.

“Sueño con el día en que crearé esculturas que respiren, suden, tosan, rían, bostecen, sonrían, jadeen, bailen, caminen, gateen… y se muevan entre la gente como las sombras se mueven entre la gente”, declaró alguna vez el artista filipino David Medalla (1). Esta ambigüedad entre sujetos y objetos en movimiento es lo que me interesa en mi investigación de las procesiones y desfiles organizados por artistas. ¿Cómo se unen sujetos y objetos en el proceso de activación y qué queda de los objetos después de haber sido usados en una presentación? ¿Cómo se muestran sus “residuos” en las exposiciones? ¿Es posible no fracasar al intentar transmitir el espíritu festivo que estos objetos debían tener en las calles al entrar al espacio de exhibición?

Al pensar en las procesiones diseñadas y organizadas por artistas hay que ir más allá de los contextos geográficos e institucionales, también son importantes el nivel de compromiso de los participantes, la utilería y el vestuario diseñados para la ocasión o la música que acompaña sus escenificaciones efímeras. Lo interesante son las maneras como los artistas visuales re-imaginan el teatro callejero y las dinámicas entre sujetos y objetos en el espacio. El filósofo y antropólogo francés Bruno Latour dice: “quizás no haya una diferencia más decisiva entre pensadores que la posición a la que se inclinan con respecto al espacio; ¿es el espacio aquello dentro de lo cual residen objetos u sujetos? ¿O es el espacio una de las muchas conexiones que se establecen entre objetos y sujetos?” (2). Parece haber mucha discusión en la actualidad sobre la relación que nosotros como sujetos tenemos con los objetos que nos rodean y que movemos en el espacio.

Abravanation Ipiranga

Ricardo Castro, Abravanation Ipiranga, 2005, performance, Ação Abravanada en colaboración con los artistas Lau Neves e Melissa Sguarizi, Av. Ipiranga, São Paulo, SP.

 

A pesar de su carácter efímero, los procesiones y desfiles dejan rastros: objetos o documentos. La mayoría de estos se generan en el proceso de preparación (los permisos, la correspondencia, etc.) y medios visuales como el video y la fotografía toman el papel de documentar, hasta el punto en que el “documento fotográfico reemplaza al objeto u evento” y deja de ser un mero registro de él, como lo señaló el curador Okwui Enwezor en el catálogo de su exposición Archive Fever en ICP, Nueva York (2008) (3).

Aunque la tecnología nos ha permitido volver a revisar los eventos efímeros con más detalle, los artistas se han acostumbrado a producir obras inmanentes a partir de lo efímero. Los historiadores del arte, de otro lado, han lamentado la escasez de documentación en algunos elementos del performance en artistas del renacimiento. Sir Kenneth Clark escribió: “al estudiar la arquitectura e incluso la pintura del renacimiento, siempre debemos recordar que hay una rama de cada una que se encuentra perdida casi por completo para nosotros: la arquitectura y decoración diseñada para desfiles y mascaradas”. Han habido algunos intentos por crear un registro de estas obras, en particular de las procesiones triunfales que honraban a los poderosos y que tomaban forma editorial de libros conmemorativos, realizados especialmente para la ocasión, donde se reproducían los principales motivos visuales usados por los artistas”(4). Hoy en día no es tan diferente, aunque ya no hablamos de “libros conmemorativos” sino de publicaciones de artistas, revistas o catálogos, además de una cantidad de medios online que nos transmiten inmediatamente imágenes y videos de eventos alrededor del mundo.

¿Cuáles son las consideraciones de los artistas al pensar en la estética de estos “residuos” (fotos, pero también video y vestuario) al momento de mostrarse en el espacio de exposición, después del performance? ¿Cómo cambia el trabajo al no ser experimentado en vivo? Acá me centraré en performances recientes de Arto Lindsay y de Luisa Mota que presencié acá en São Paulo y otro en el que trabajé con los artistas brasileños f.marquespenteado en Turín.

Arto Lindsay Parada pedra, 2013_photo by Ricardo Amado

Arto Lindsay, Parada Pedra, desfile, 2013. Fotografía de Ricardo Amado.

Una de las figuras más activas de la escena artística brasileña en cuanto a procesiones ha sido el músico y artista Arto Lindsay. En una extensa entrevista que realizamos el año pasado declaró: “estar en un desfile cuatro o cinco horas es una experiencia transformadora, es una actividad ritual en el sentido más amplio del término: cuando termina, eres alguien distinto”(5). Lindsay ha concebido desfiles para el festival Performa en Nueva York, Portikus en Frankfurt am Main, la bienal de Venecia, el carnaval en Salvador da Bahía y en Art Basel Hong Kong. Para São Paulo, Lindsay organizó Parada Pedra en Panorama 33 (2013), la exposición bi-anual de arte contemporáneo que organiza el Museu de Arte Moderna (MAM). Durante el proceso, que se llevó a cabo en octubre de 2013 en el pasaje comercial Nova Brandão del centro de la ciudad, los participantes cargaban modelos a escala de dos edificios icónicos: la Casa Malaparte (en Capri) y el Teatro Farnese (en Parma). La idea curatorial de Panorama 33 fue re-imaginar un posible futuro para un MAM itinerante; el museo fue diseñado por Lina Bo Bardi y está ubicado de manera un poco forzada bajo un pasaje diseñado por Óscar Niemeyer en el parque Ibirapuera de São Paulo. La Casa Malaparte y el Teatro Farnese representan arquitecturas utópicas que podrían albergar un nuevo MAM y, dentro de su contexto particular en aquella ocasión, señalaban tácitamente a un número de edificios abandonados en el centro de la ciudad que podrían adecuarse como salas de exposición (Cine Marrocos y otros más alrededor del vecindario Largo Paisandu en el centro de São Paulo). El performance con sus principales protagonistas (los modelos a escala de Capri y Parma) hacían referencia al pasado bohemio del centro de São Paulo y su posible futuro. Cuando terminó el performance, los participantes llevaron los modelos a escala al museo para ser exhibidos. Sin embargo, pocos parecieron entender su significado, pues el único intento de conectar los modelos con lo que había presenciado un reducido público unos días antes fue un texto en la pared.

Arto Lindsay Parada pedra, 2013_photo2 by Ricardo Amado (2)

Arto Lindsay, Parada Pedra, desfile, 2013. Fotografía de Ricardo Amado.

AL2

Arto Lindsay, Parada Pedra, 2013. Maquetas de Casa Malaparte (Capri) y del Teatro Farnese (Parma) usadas en el desfile del día 19 de octubre de 2013, en la glaería Nova Barão, São Paulo, en el Museo Difuso y Urbano, del Ejecutado por Carla Zollinger; Asistentes: Acássio Murillo and Fábio Santos. Fotografía de Tobi Maier.

Para la edición 2013 del festival anual de performance Verbo en São Paulo, la artista portuguesa Luisa Mota escenificó una procesión titulada Hombres invisibles, que partía de la Galería Vermelho y recorría la Avenida Paulista. Para Mota “el medio del desfile, la procesión, la protesta, un grupo de individuos que caminan y marchan juntos es una fuente poderosa de fe/creencia aglomerada/energía reunida en algo que les da una unidad […] Para mí lo fascinante es que el material está vivo y que respira, tiene una voluntad propia y un propósito, una vida propia […]. Juntos creamos una coreografía de símbolos, un ritual, se comienza a crear un lenguaje que comunica un mensaje a otra gente porque está claro que la gente hace resonar cosas entre sí” (6). Mota no hace distinciones entre objetos y documentación y declara que guarda lo que queda, objetos y vestidos; dice que las fotos y videos deben ser asumidos también como obras, como artefactos antropológicos hechos con el fin de ser mostrados y utilizados.

Luisa Mota sp1

Luisa Mota, Hombres invisibles, 2013, performance, São Paulo. Fotografías de Luisa Mota.

Luisa Mota sp3

Luisa Mota, Hombres invisibles, 2013, performance, São Paulo. Fotografías de Luisa Mota.

 

Más recientemente, el artista brasileño f.marquespenteado escenificó Tres novelas (2014), un performance en Per4M, la sección inaugural de performance en la feria Artissima de Turín, en noviembre de 2014. Tres novelas presentaba historias ficticias de tres hombres (Sean el escritor, Jonas el fotógrafo y Javier el arquitecto/urbanista), descritas a través del lente de un narrador (el artista mismo) que fue amante de los tres. Tres novelas comenzó con una breve procesión encabezada por el artista mismo, quien continuamente hacía sonar una pequeña campana de cristal, seguido por tres actores (personificando a los tres amantes) que llevaban dibujos y obras textiles desde el stand de la galería Mendes Wood DM al escenario de la sección Per4M. Allí, se habían instalado tres paneles que, de una manera warburguiana, combinaban material recolectado por el artista en los últimos 20 años en los mercados de las pulgas de Londres, o tomado de revistas, mapas, catálogos y manuales de instrucciones de toda clase. Estos incluían imágenes que de paisajes naturales, carátulas de obras literarias (como la de Christoper and Gay: A Partisans View of the Greenwhich Village homosexual Scene, de Wallace Hamilton) o fotografías eróticas, y se combinaban con dibujos y notas escritas a mano que servían para representar el universo de cada uno de los tres amantes. Muchas de las obras presentadas en Turín vinieron a São Paulo después del performance y se presentaron en la exposición del mismo nombre en la galería. De esta forma, en estos proyectos de performance “de intensa autoría”(7), se piensa en los “restos” por anticipado y a menudo se preservan para una vida posterior (ya sea con otra documentación o sin ella) en un contexto expositivo.

1013648_1034244939925196_779401499141056782_n

Rufos y bufos bloco, 2015, performance. Fotografía de Cau y Rufos y Bufos.

 

1378572_1034245723258451_4872399250941708049_n

Rufos y bufos bloco, 2015, performance. Fotografía de Cau y Rufos y Bufos.

Es un modelo que contrasta con otros proyectos participatorios, como el carnaval de São Paulo, con los muchos blocos concebidos por artistas, incluyendo vestuario y otros elementos creados a menudo en colaboración y que se descartan al final del evento. Para el proyecto colectivo Rufos y bufos bloco, un grupo de artistas, diseñadores, escritores y arquitectos se reunieron durante un mes en un apartamento del centro de la ciudad a concebir los vestuarios y elementos de utilería, pocos de los cuales sobrevivieron a la procesión realizada a comienzos de marzo de 2015. Otro ejemplo de esta aproximación sería el artista brasileño Ricardo Castro y su serie de eventos llamados ‘abravanaçoes’. Para ellos, el artista crea vestuarios y accesorios a partir de una paleta de materiales y colores, y los reparte entre sus amigos y participantes voluntarios que se los quedan durante y después del evento.

Abravanation Martin Francisco

Ricardo Castro, Abravanation Martin Francisco, 2006, performance, Ação Abravanada en colaboración con los artistas Renata Abbade, Calle Martin Francisco, São Paulo, SP.

Quizás las caminatas participativas organizadas por diferentes artistas acá reflejan la idea de jugar con la ciudad, activándola y manifestando una presencia en el espacio público. Sin embargo, es una idea del juego que no tiene nada de naif o inocente, sino que parte de una creencia activa en la necesidad de involucrar al otro; son experiencias en forma de caminatas que no solo concuerdan con la idea situacionista de una deriva solitaria, sino que están construidas con base en la idea de agencia del sujeto involucrado.

Esta agencia crea significado y se construye a partir de las experiencias de cada participante en un esfuerzo colectivo de intercambio. Como lo señaló el filósofo estadounidense John Dewey: “mientras las raíces de cada experiencia se encuentran en la interacción de una criatura viva con su entorno, esa experiencia se vuelve consciente, material de percepción, sólo al ser penetrada por significados derivados de experiencias previas” (8).

Así, cuando las caminatas y proyectos cartográficos tienen un componente semántico, corporal, táctil o visual inherente, un marco arquitectónico o una agenda sociopolítica, pueden generar significados que nos ayuden a pasar de una pregunta representativa — “¿de dónde venimos?”— a una participativa que apunta hacia el futuro —“¿hacia dónde vamos?”—.

 

Para Terremoto, São Paulo, mayo de 2015
Traducido al español por Manuel Kalmanovitz G.

Notas:
(1) Signals 1,no. 8 (June-July 1965); reimpreso en el catálogo When Attitudes Become Form, Kunsthalle Bern, 1969, sin número de página.
(2) Bruno Latour, Spheres and Networks: Two Ways to Reinterpret Globalization en Harvard Design Magazine 30, Primavera/Verano 2009, p.142
(3) Enwezor, Okwui, Archive Fever, Uses of the Document in Contemporary Art, International, Center of Photography, Nueva York, Steidl, Goettingen, 2008, p.23 [consultado en http://bookchin.net/feeling/readings/photography_between_history.pdf]
(4) Gregory Battcock y Robert Nickas, (ed.) The Art of Performance, A Critical Anthology, 1984, p.15 (el arte del performance renacentista tomó buena parte de su forma de la sociedad altamente ritual de la edad media, donde las procesiones de la iglesia y las formalidades feudales como las justas se planeaban anónimamente. El individualismo contaminó estas formas con interpretaciones personales y despertó un deseo de fama que naturalmente condujo a los hombres de una época obsesionada con la antigüedad a metáforas de la grandeza personal como el triunfo y, su contraparte, el arco triunfal. P. 20)
(5) En ArtReview, Londres, Septiembre 2014, p.104
(6) En una conversación vía correo electrónico con el autor.
(7) Claire Bishop (2012) Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship, Londres y Nueva York: Verso, p.39
(8) Dewey J. in Ross, S. (ed.) Art and its Significance, 1994, Nueva York: State University of New York Press p.218

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Méthode Room

Mauro Piva

Falto de palabra

Patrones de prueba