Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

Sol Calero in conversation with Elise Lammer

By Elise Lammer & Sol Calero

Elise Lammer and Sol Calero discuss the artist's critique of tropical and Caribbean exoticization.

Elise Lammer y Sol Calero hablan sobre la crítica de la exotización tropical y caribeña en la práctica de la artista.

5.-Sol-Calero-'El-buen-vecino',-2015,-SALTS,-Basel.-Installation-view.-Courtesy-of-the-artist,-SALTS,-Basel-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London

Sol Calero, El buen vecino, 2015. SALTS, Basel. Installation view. Courtesy of the artist, SALTS, Basel and Laura Bartlett Gallery, London.

 

Sol Calero is a Venezuela-born artist currently living in Berlin. In her recent projects, she explores ideas around cultural commitment and identity. With daring installations and social projects whose aesthetics often flirt with kitsch, Calero highlights that when looking at the history of Latin American Art with the eyes of an immigrant, the game of influences is anything but unidirectional.

4.-Sol-Calero-'Cambures',-2014

Sol Calero, Cambures, 2014

 

Elise Lammer:
 Sol, your recent Fruit Painting series and semi-domestic installations are colorful, saturated with exotic fruits and flowers, and contain a happy mix of symbols and stereotypes appropriated from different Latin American countries indistinctly. Are you suggesting that the audience you’re addressing doesn’t know about the specificities of each country or are you operating this simplification on purpose?

Sol Calero: When I started looking into this topic three years ago, I realized that Latin American art had become more popular among Western curators and artists, and that identity was at the core of most of the projects I came across. Yet, “Latin America” is still often presented as a global and simplified version of all the countries that spread over a wide geographical area. As you suggested, every country has its own identity and history with the associated cultural heritage this involves, but I’m particularly interested in the cultural stereotypes that operate inside and outside of those countries. To me, when dealing with identity, simplification is as problematic as it is fruitful; it boils down to the perception and mediation of the other.

Unlike Mexico, Venezuela–where I was born and grew up until I was 17–has a very different relationship to its own history, mostly because Pre-Colombian Venezuela was populated by nomadic tribes that left little trace of their existence. Lacking the ancient visual markers that other countries have constructed visual identity upon, Venezuela has instead focused on its natural resources and built a visual vocabulary based on representations of the Caribbean, becoming one of the most exotic places in the shared unconscious. My question then became: what would be the essence of the Caribbean if I had to represent it?

You mentioned the bright, primary colors as markers of clichés, yet some of the elements I use in my work refer to specific historical moments. Think of the “Good Neighbor policy,” the political strategy that was promoted by US President Roosevelt in the early 1930s, designed to improve diplomatic relations between the US and Latin American countries. A lot of money was invested in order to promote a certain idea of Latin America, fight xenophobia in the US and most importantly, protect the oil business. This in turn created a whole new identity, and though it was tailor-made for that specific moment and followed a clear political agenda, some ideas and symbols transcended the American territory.

The most interesting part is that such constructed identity in turn influenced people from the countries whose cultural symbols had been appropriated in the first place, leading them to recycle such narratives and adopt them as part of their culture. For example, while artists of Modernismo took great inspiration from French Symbolism during their numerous trips to Europe, Josef Albers’s formalism was clearly influenced by pre-Columbian Art, and countless similar examples. As a kid, I remember often being confronted with representations of the Caribbean that were not far from an earthly Eden. I think the country understood that it could benefit from such stereotypes, at least on an economic level, and learned how to manipulate those symbols to it’s own advantage.

In my work, I try to bring attention to such phenomena, but I always try to avoid being too dramatic about it. My research of Latin American art from the 1960s and 1970s brought to my attention that in many countries controlled by oppressive dictatorships, art was more political and operated as a tool for protest, yet didn’t always portray violence directly. Such strategies inspired me to think of ways to deal with the long and often painful political histories of the countries I’m investigating in a less dramatic way. Venezuela being nowadays one of the most dangerous countries on the planet, I feel a responsibility to engage with my country through my art, yet I don’t feel that simply showing the corruption and resulting crime is the most efficient way to proceed.

8.-Sol-Calero-'Salsa',-2014,-Gillmeier-Rech,-Berlin.-Installation-view

Sol Calero, Salsa, 2014, Gillmeier Rech, Berlin. Installation-view. Courtesy of the artist.

 

EL: You grew up in Venezuela but studied art and developed your career in Europe, between Spain, Germany, and the UK. Your work bears the influences of all the places you lived in but you also admit to making subtle references to some Latin American painters, with motives borrowed from Diego Rivera and the conceptual approach of Joaquín Torres García. I’m saying “subtle” because I believe the untrained Western eye might not identify them, yet they are obvious references in the Latin American painting tradition.

SC: My work emphasizes that I’m not from either side. I have all the symptoms of the immigrant, who very often needs to simplify her own references in order to blend in a new environment. Having had the privilege of escaping Caracas and having managed to settle and thrive in a safer environment, there is no option for me to go back to Venezuela for more than short periods of time. The current political situation is so desperate that very little of Venezuela’s rich cultural heritage has been able to travel beyond its own borders. This implies that it’s only possible to conduct a thorough research by going there and spending enough time to get first-hand experience; by interviewing people, visiting libraries and exploring the collections of the museums. This to a large extent explains why I use the most obvious references and like to exaggerate them: it reflects my, and by deduction many people’s inability to dig deeper into the country’s history and therefore change the superficial ideas that circulate about it. On the other hand, as a result of a long line of corrupted governments, the history of the country has be rewritten many times in order to match and serve any given political agenda.

2.-Sol-Calero-'La-Escuela-del-Sur,'-2015.-A-Studio-Voltaire-commission.-Installation-view-Studio-Voltaire,-London.-Courtesy-of-the-artist-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London

Sol Calero, La Escuela del Sur, 2014. A Studio Voltaire commission. Installation view. Installation view Studio Voltaire, London. Courtesy of the artist and Laura Bartlett Gallery, London.

3.-Sol-Calero-'La-Escuela-del-Sur,'-2015.-A-Studio-Voltaire-commission.-Installation-view-Studio-Voltaire,-London.-Courtesy-of-the-artist-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London

Sol Calero, La Escuela del Sur, 2014. A Studio Voltaire commission. Installation view. Installation view Studio Voltaire, London. Courtesy of the artist and Laura Bartlett Gallery, London.

EL: Do you know anything about how your art is received in Venezuela?

SC: The art community is rather small, yet I can’t really tell how my work is perceived there. The first time I exhibited in Caracas, it was on the occasion of the Premio Salón Banesco Jóvenes con FIA in 2014, a national art competition for which I was awarded the 3rd prize and later invited to do my first institutional exhibition (Interacciones, Sala Mendoza, July 2015). For that, I decided to invite all the nominated artists who didn’t get a prize, which led me to conduct many studio visits and learn a lot about what my peers were doing; it was a wonderful experience during which I learned a lot. I felt that in general, artists seemed careful when discussing art, which is probably another by-product of the tense political atmosphere. It’s easier to speak for my fellow Venezuelans living outside of the country; every time I do a show in Europe, strangers come to greet me. They don’t necessarily like the work but there is definitely a sense of pride. The bottom line is that I don’t know if everyone understands my approach and the game behind it. Once a curator invited me to do an exhibition, but only wanted to show my abstract paintings, as they corresponded to a more recognizable canon of art than the Fruit Paintings, which look so typically “Latin American.” I realized that the exact issues I was trying to fight were actually sustained by the same people who had the potential (and admitted will) to solve them. But this is only an anecdote and doesn’t reflect what the younger generation of artists I know thinks, so it might be a generational problem.

9.-Sol-Calero-'Salsa',-2014,-Gillmeier-Rech,-Berlin.-Installation-view

Sol Calero, Salsa, 2014. Gillmeier Rech, Berlin. Installation view. Courtesy of the artist.

EL: I would like to know more about your background in design. Very often your work materializes in environments that are very carefully arranged, with objects and props that evoke a domestic space where your paintings are integrated in a broader artistic context. Exceeding the agenda of an art object, those props can often be manipulated by the audience in what becomes a stage for social situations to materialize.

SC: I have a background in design and I’ve always been fascinated by architecture, interior design and fashion. That explains why my work is so aestheticized. When creating such social spaces, I’m trying to outgrow the usual function of an art exhibition. In the search for my own identity and in a surge of romantic nostalgia I often need to create environments that encourage people to meet and exchange ideas. Venezuela has a strong street culture and the fragility of the political situation is often translated with the motto “anything can happen,” which is a very rich and fruitful philosophy that I try to translate in my creative process. This spontaneity is very much the opposite of what you experience in Germany, where I’m currently based. It’s also a way of questioning the sacredness of the white cube, which is also a Western invention. Very often the only time the space is activated is during the opening is after everything is pretty much dead. I’m interested in the idea of commitment both from the artist and the audience and I am devising situations that allow for things to slow down while challenging the usual limitations of art institutions. I get quite sad when I get an email asking me when I’m planning to de-install, weeks before my show has even opened! To me this highlights how commodified art has become and leads us to forget why we (artists, curators) are making projects in the first place.

6.-Sol-Calero-'El-buen-vecino',-2015,-SALTS,-Basel.-Installation-view.-Courtesy-of-the-artist,-SALTS,-Basel-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London.-3jpg

Sol Calero, El Buen Vecino, 2015. SALTS, Basel. Installation view. Courtesy of the artist, SALTS, Basel and Laura Bartlett Gallery, London.

7.-Sol-Calero-'El-buen-vecino',-2015,-SALTS,-Basel.-Installation-view.-Courtesy-of-the-artist,-SALTS,-Basel-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London

Sol Calero, El Buen Vecino, 2015. SALTS, Basel. Installation view. Courtesy of the artist, SALTS, Basel and Laura Bartlett Gallery, London.

EL: The project we did together at SALTS (El Buen Vecino, Basel, April 2015) was dealing with the community of neighbors living in the residential buildings surrounding the gallery. I remember that the first time you came to visit the space you immediately noticed that, as often in Switzerland, the neighbors didn’t know each other although they shared a garden or had been living on the same floor for years. Your reaction was to create a project that would allow them to meet each other. As in other projects, you consciously instrumentalized your own work in order to encourage interactions that were ultimately out of your hands. Days after the opening, the colorful Caribbean pavilion we built in the garden of SALTS became a hang-out spot for some neighbors.

SC: It was great to find out that it worked out and that some people appropriated this newly created space. Inspired by colonial architecture, it had a front porch and the inside displayed some elements that evoked a domestic space. The shape and colors of the pavilion contrasted so strongly with the surrounding architecture that one could spot it from the other side of the river! Such a simple strategy proved to be successful.

I did something similar with the project Salsa (Gillmeier Rech, September 2014), during which I redecorated a salsa school in Berlin and organized free dance classes. Only German teachers worked there and the project proved how anyone can appropriate anyone’s cultural identity. Not only were they great dancers, they had developed a very “Latin” attitude that could not have symbolized the “exotic” better. In both cases, I built environments that were able to alter and question the behavior of the people activating it, bringing a new reality that to me is truly hybrid.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.-Sol-Calero-'El-buen-vecino',-2015,-SALTS,-Basel.-Installation-view.-Courtesy-of-the-artist,-SALTS,-Basel-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London

Sol Calero, El buen vecino, 2015. SALTS, Basilea. Vista de instalación. Cortesía de la artista, SALTS, Basel, y Laura Bartlett Gallery, Londres.

Sol Calero es una artista nacida en Venezuela que actualmente vive en Berlín. En sus últimos proyectos ha explorado la identidad y el compromiso cultural. En sus audaces instalaciones y proyectos sociales cuya estética suele coquetear con lo kitsch, Calero destaca que al revisar la historia del arte latinoamericano desde los ojos de un inmigrante, el juego de influencias es cualquier cosa menos uni-direccional.

4.-Sol-Calero-'Cambures',-2014

Sol Calero, Cambure, 2014

Elise Lammer: Sol, tu serie reciente Fruit Paintings y tus instalaciones semi-domésticas son coloridas, saturadas de frutas y flores exóticas y contienen una feliz mezcla de símbolos y estereotipos apropiados indistintamente de diferentes países de América Latina. ¿Estás sugiriendo que el público al que te diriges no sabe nada de las especificidades de cada país o estás operando esta simplificación a propósito?

Sol Calero: Cuando empecé a investigar este tema hace tres años, me di cuenta de que el arte latinoamericano se había vuelto más popular entre curadores y artistas occidentales, y que la identidad era el núcleo de la mayoría de los proyectos que encontraba. Sin embargo, a menudo aún se presenta a América Latina como una versión global y simplificada de todos los países que se extienden en una amplia zona geográfica. Como señalas, cada país tiene su propia identidad y su historia con su propio patrimonio cultural asociado, pero estoy particularmente interesada en los estereotipos culturales que operan dentro y fuera de todos esos países. Para mí, cuando se trata de la identidad, la simplificación es tan problemática como es fructífera; se trata de la percepción y a la mediación del otro.

A diferencia de México, Venezuela, donde nací y crecí hasta los 17 años, tiene una relación muy diferente a su propia historia, sobre todo porque la Venezuela precolombina estaba poblada por tribus nómadas que dejaron pocos rastros de su existencia. A falta de los antiguos referentes visuales sobre la que otros países han construido su identidad visual, Venezuela se ha centrado en sus recursos naturales y construido un vocabulario visual basada en representaciones del Caribe, convirtiéndose en uno de los lugares más exóticos del inconsciente compartido. Mi pregunta se convirtió entonces en: ¿cuál sería la esencia del Caribe si tuviera que representarla?

Has mencionado los colores brillantes primarios como clichés, sin embargo, algunos de los elementos que utilizo en mi trabajo se refieren a momentos históricos específicos. Pensemos en la “Good Neighbor policy”, la estrategia política que fue promovida por el presidente estadounidense Roosevelt en la década de 1930, diseñada para mejorar las relaciones diplomáticas entre los EE.UU. y los países latinoamericanos. Una gran cantidad de dinero fue invertido con el fin de promover una cierta idea de América Latina, combatir la xenofobia en los EE.UU. y lo más importante, proteger el negocio del petróleo. Esto a su vez creó una identidad completamente nueva, y aunque la política fue hecha a medida para ese momento específico y siguió una agenda clara, algunas ideas y símbolos trascendieron el territorio estadounidense.

 

Lo más interesante es que ésa identidad construida a su vez influyó en las personas de los países cuyos símbolos culturales habían sido apropiados en primer lugar, llevándolos a reciclar esas narraciones y a adoptarlas como parte de su cultura. Por ejemplo, mientras que los artistas del modernismo tomaron gran inspiración de simbolismo francés durante sus numerosos viajes a Europa, el formalismo de Josef Albers fue claramente influenciado por el arte precolombino, y un sinnúmero de ejemplos similares. Cuando era niña, recuerdo que a menudo me enfrenté a representaciones del Caribe que no estaban lejos de mostrarlo como un edén terrenal. Creo que el país entendió que podría beneficiarse de esos estereotipos, al menos en el plano económico, y aprendió a manipular esos símbolos para su propio provecho.

 

En mi trabajo, trato de llamar la atención sobre este tipo de fenómenos pero siempre trato de evitar ser demasiado dramática sobre ellos. Mi investigación del arte latinoamericano de los años 1960 y 1970 me hizo entender que en muchos países controlados por dictaduras opresivas, el arte era más político y funcionaba como una herramienta para la protesta, sin embargo, no siempre retrataba la violencia de manera directa. Estas estrategias me inspiraron a pensar en maneras de hacer frente a las largas y a menudo dolorosas historias políticas de los países que estoy investigando de una manera menos dramática. Venezuela es hoy en día uno de los países más peligrosos del planeta y siento la responsabilidad de colaborar con mi país a través de mi arte, pero no siento que simplemente mostrar la corrupción y el crimen sean la forma más eficaz de proceder.

8.-Sol-Calero-'Salsa',-2014,-Gillmeier-Rech,-Berlin.-Installation-view

Sol Calero, Salsa, 2014, Gillmeier Rech, Berlin. Vista de instalación. Cortesía de la artista.

EL: Creciste en Venezuela, pero estudiaste arte y desarrollaste tu carrera en Europa, entre España, Alemania y el Reino Unido. Tu obra está marcada por las influencias de todos los lugares en los que viviste pero también admite hacer referencias sutiles a algunos pintores latinoamericanos, con motivos tomados de Diego Rivera y el enfoque conceptual de Joaquín Torres García. Estoy diciendo “sutiles” porque creo que el ojo occidental no entrenado no necesariamente las identifica inmediatamente, sin embargo son referencias obvias en la tradición de la pintura latinoamericana.

SC: Mi trabajo enfatiza que no soy ni de uno ni de otro lado. Tengo todos los síntomas del inmigrante, que a menudo necesita simplificar sus propias referencias con el fin de fundirse en un nuevo entorno. Después de haber tenido el privilegio de escapar de Caracas y de haber conseguido asentarme y prosperar en un entorno más seguro, no hay opción para mí de regresar a Venezuela por más que por períodos cortos de tiempo. La situación política actual es tan desesperada que muy poco de la rica herencia cultural de Venezuela ha podido viajar más allá de sus propias fronteras. Esto implica que sólo sea posible llevar a cabo una investigación a fondo pasando el suficiente tiempo allá como para obtener experiencia de primera mano; entrevistando a gente, visitando bibliotecas y explorando las colecciones de los museos. Esto en gran medida explica por qué utilizo las referencias más obvias y me gusta exagerarlas: esto refleja mi incapacidad (y por deducción, la de muchas personas) de profundizar en la historia del país y por lo tanto cambiar las ideas superficiales que circulan sobre él. Por otra parte, como resultado de una larga serie de gobiernos corruptos, la historia del país ha sido re-escrita varias veces con el fin de ajustarse y dar servicio a la agenda política de turno.

2.-Sol-Calero-'La-Escuela-del-Sur,'-2015.-A-Studio-Voltaire-commission.-Installation-view-Studio-Voltaire,-London.-Courtesy-of-the-artist-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London

Sol Calero, Escuela del Sur, 2015. Una comisión de Estudio Voltaire, Londres. Cortesía de la artista y de Laura Bartlett Gallery, Londres.

3.-Sol-Calero-'La-Escuela-del-Sur,'-2015.-A-Studio-Voltaire-commission.-Installation-view-Studio-Voltaire,-London.-Courtesy-of-the-artist-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London

Sol Calero, Escuela del Sur, 2015. Una comisión de Estudio Voltaire, Londres. Cortesía de la artista y de Laura Bartlett Gallery, Londres.

EL: ¿Sabes algo acerca de la forma en que se recibe tu arte en Venezuela?

SC: La comunidad del arte es más bien pequeña, pero aún así no puedo saber cómo se percibe mi trabajo allí. La primera vez que expuse en Caracas fue con motivo del Premio Salón Banesco Jóvenes con FIA en 2014, un concurso nacional de arte en el que fui galardonada con el 3er premio y posteriormente fui invitada a hacer mi primera exposición institucional (Interacciones, Sala Mendoza , julio de 2015). Para esa exposición decidí invitar a todos los artistas nominados que no recibieron premio, lo que me llevó a hacer muchas visitas de estudio y aprender bastante acerca de lo que mis colegas estaban haciendo; fue una experiencia maravillosa. Sentí que, en general, los artistas parecían cuidadosos al hablar de arte, lo que es, probablemente, otro subproducto de la tensa atmósfera política. Para mis compatriotas venezolanos que viven fuera del país es más fácil hablar; cada vez que hago un show en Europa, desconocidos vienen a saludarme. No les gusta necesariamente la obra, pero definitivamente hay un sentimiento de orgullo. En conclusión, no sé si todo el mundo entiende mi enfoque y el juego detrás de él. Una vez un curador me invitó a hacer una exposición, pero sólo quería mostrar mis pinturas abstractas, ya que correspondían a un canon más reconocible que las Fruit Paintings, que parecen tan típicamente “de América Latina.” Me di cuenta de que las cuestiones con las que precisamente estaba tratando de luchar eran sostenidas por las mismas personas que tenían el potencial (y la voluntad, si la aceptaban) de resolverlas. Pero esto es sólo una anécdota y no refleja lo que piensa la joven generación de artistas que conozco, así que podría ser un problema generacional.

9.-Sol-Calero-'Salsa',-2014,-Gillmeier-Rech,-Berlin.-Installation-view

Sol Calero, Salsa, 2014. Gillmeier Rech, Berlín. Vista de instalación. Cortesía de la artista.

EL: Me gustaría saber más acerca de tu experiencia en el diseño. Muy a menudo, tu trabajo se materializa en ambientes que son cuidadosamente dispuestos, con objetos y utilería que evocan un espacio doméstico donde tus pinturas se integran en un contexto artístico más amplio. Excediendo la clasificación como objeto de arte, esa utilería a menudo puede ser manipulada por el público, en lo que se convierte en un escenario para materializar situaciones sociales.

SC: Tengo experiencia en diseño y siempre me ha fascinado la arquitectura, el interiorismo y la moda. Eso explica por qué mi trabajo es tan estetizante. Al crear este tipo de espacios sociales, estoy tratando de superar la función habitual de una exposición de arte. En la búsqueda de mi propia identidad y en una oleada de nostalgia romántica, a menudo necesito crear ambientes que animan a la gente a reunirse e intercambiar ideas. Venezuela tiene una fuerte cultura de la calle y la fragilidad de la situación política se traduce a menudo con el lema “todo puede pasar”, que es una filosofía muy rica y fructífera que trato de traducir en mi proceso creativo. Esta espontaneidad es básicamente lo contrario de lo que se experimenta en Alemania, donde vivo actualmente. Es también una manera de cuestionar el carácter sagrado del cubo blanco, que también es un invento occidental. Muy a menudo, la única vez que se activa el espacio es durante la inauguración, después de la cual todo está prácticamente muerto. Estoy interesada en la idea de compromiso de parte tanto de la artista como de la audiencia y estoy ideando situaciones que permiten desacelerar las cosas al desafiar las limitaciones habituales de las instituciones de arte. Me pongo bastante triste cuando recibo un correo electrónico preguntándome cuándo planeo desinstalar, ¡incluso semanas antes de que mi exposición haya abierto! Para mí esto pone de relieve la manera en que el arte se ha convertido en mercancía, llevándonos a olvidar por qué nosotros (artistas, curadores) estamos haciendo proyectos en primer lugar.

6.-Sol-Calero-'El-buen-vecino',-2015,-SALTS,-Basel.-Installation-view.-Courtesy-of-the-artist,-SALTS,-Basel-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London.-3jpg

Sol Calero, El buen vecino, 2015. SALTS, Basilea. Vista de instalación. Cortesía de la artista, SALTS, Basel, y Laura Bartlett Gallery, Londres.

7.-Sol-Calero-'El-buen-vecino',-2015,-SALTS,-Basel.-Installation-view.-Courtesy-of-the-artist,-SALTS,-Basel-and-Laura-Bartlett-Gallery,-London

Sol Calero, El buen vecino, 2015. SALTS, Basilea. Vista de instalación. Cortesía de la artista, SALTS, Basel, y Laura Bartlett Gallery, Londres.

 

 

EL: El proyecto que hicimos juntas en SALTS (El Buen Vecino, Basilea, abril de 2015) se ocupaba de la comunidad de vecinos que viven en los edificios de viviendas que rodean la galería. Recuerdo que la primera vez que viniste a visitar el espacio, de inmediato te diste cuenta de que, como suele suceder en Suiza, los vecinos no se conocían entre sí, a pesar de que comparten un jardín o habían estado viviendo en el mismo piso durante años. Tu reacción fue la de crear un proyecto que les permitiera conocerse entre sí. Al igual que en otros proyectos, instrumentalizaste conscientemente tu propio trabajo con el fin de fomentar interacciones que en últimas estban fuera de tus manos. Días después de la inauguración, el colorido pabellón del Caribe que construimos en el jardín de SALTS se convirtió para algunos vecinos en un espacio exterior de encuentro.

 

SC: Fue genial descubrir que funcionó y que algunas personas se apropiaron de este nuevo espacio. Inspirado en la arquitectura colonial, tenía un porche y en el interior dispuse algunos elementos que evocaban un espacio doméstico. La forma y los colores del pabellón contrastan tan fuertemente con la arquitectura circundante que se podía divisar desde el otro lado del río! Una estrategia tan simple resultó ser un éxito. Hice algo similar con el proyecto Salsa (Gillmeier Rech, septiembre de 2014), durante el cual redecoré una escuela de salsa en Berlín y organicé clases de baile gratuitas. Allí sólo trabajaban profesores alemanes y el proyecto demostró cómo cualquier persona puede apropiarse de la identidad cultural de otra persona. No sólo eran grandes bailarines sino que habían desarrollado una actitud muy “Latina” ​​que no podría haber simbolizado mejor el ” lo exótico”. En ambos casos, construí ambientes que fueron capaces de alterar y cuestionar el comportamiento de la gente que los activaba, trayendo una nueva realidad que para mí es verdaderamente híbrida.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Mar Bermejo

Israel Lund

A/W 14

Cindy, Carmine, George, Pierre y otros