Contemporary Art in the Americas Arte Contemporáneo en las Américas

New Bourgeois Latin American Immigrant who Learned Shopping and has Good Taste: Identity Subversions in the work of Elena Tejada-Herrera

By Florencia Portocarrero

Florencia Portocarrero highlights the historical importance of Peruvian artist Elena Tejada-Herrera’s practice and its relevance to understand the experience of migrants in the current political panorama.

Florencia Portocarrero resalta la importancia histórica de la práctica de la artista peruana Elena Tejada-Herrera y su relevancia para entender la experiencia de los sujetos inmigrantes en la coyuntura política actual.

Tejada-Herrera-IMMIGRANT-2

Elena Tejada-Herrera, New Bourgeois Latina Immigrant Who Learned Shopping and Has Good Taste: subversions in the work of Elena Tejada-Herrera, 2005, performance. Photo by Frank George Kanelos. From the archive of Elena Tejada-Herrera. Courtesy of the artist.

I

Except for scant inclusions in collective exhibitions and a handful of mentions in specialty publications, Elena Tejada-Herrera’s work has been left out of recent years’ accounts of contemporary Peruvian art. The omission has not only to do with the fact the artist has lived outside Peru for fifteen years, but primarily because of her insistence on elaborating a syncretic visual language that, by questioning gender relations and other identity categories, allows her to question public life and intervene in the re-creation of collective sensibilities. To that end, the artist had to initiate an alternative model for the circulation of her work, that —based on “guerrilla” style interventions in urban and virtual public space— revealed the blind spots of the circuit Lima’s art establishment legitimates. An anti-formalist and undisciplined impulse that traverses her work has made her an artist hard to classify and, despite her centrality to contemporary Peruvian art history, easy to marginalize.

Elena Tejada-Herrera began her artistic education in the mid-1990s, specializing in painting at the Arts Department at Pontificia Universidad del Perú, an art school that promoted the development of a subjective and “a-politicized” language. However, the artist soon lost her interest in “pure forms,” and began to assert a vocation for what we might call a promiscuity regarding the use of media. Indeed, on a formal level, Tejada-Herrera’s artistic practice is situated at the intersection between performance, installation, video and “socially engaged practice.” This intense hybridity of form is not merely linked to her commitment to feminism, and to exploring sexuality and female erotic desire, but constitutes a critical stance to the art market fetish logic as well.

Despite the fact that Tejada-Herrera’s contribution to the devel- opment of contemporary Peruvian art is increasingly recognized, her reputation rests almost exclusively on three performances she realized and documented in the second half of the 1990s, during the “Fujimontesinista” dictatorship. [1] The first is Señorita de buena presencia buscando empleo (1997), in which she burst into a round-table discussion at the First Lima Ibero-American Biennial [2], in an outfit made of clippings from a newspaper’s help-wanted section. The costume only exposed her crotch, calling attention to the Peruvian labor market’s reigning racial and sexual authoritarianism. Recuerdo (1998), was an action in which —emulating a corpse sealed in a black plastic bag— the artist dragged herself across the courtyard at the Universidad Nacional de San Marcos literature department as she cried out the names of students a paramilitary commando had murdered in 1992, in an act of state terrorism known as the “La Cantuta case.” And finally, there was Bomba y la bataclana en la danza del vientre (1999), in which Tejada-Herrera performed a shoddy exotic dance next to cross-dressed comedian. The piece was a clear indication of her interest in rubbing high against popular culture by recuperating a politically incorrect sense of humor from the street.

Tejada-Herrera-Senorita-2

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Señorita de buena presencia buscando empleo, 1997, performance. Camera: Adrian Arias. Editing: Elena Tejada-Herrera. From the archive of Elena Tejada-Herrera. Courtesy of the artist.

Tejada-Herrera-Senorita-1

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Señorita de buena presencia buscando empleo, 1997, performance. Camera: Adrian Arias. Editing: Elena Tejada-Herrera. From the archive of Elena Tejada-Herrera. Courtesy of the artist.

I would like to argue here that these first three Tejada-Herrera performances constituted a space of political revelation in two senses: As a woman-citizen, to the degree they presented a feminine corporality that —aware of its class- and race-based privileges— demanded public deliberation in a society where parity within the debate is not within every citizen’s realm of possibilities. And as a woman-artist, by confronting the locally predominant patriarchal modernist canon through a questioning of traditional artistic disciplines and notions such as “the work’s quality” and “good taste.” Along similar lines to what theorist Amelia Jones [3] posits in relation to certain US “body art” practices, we could say Tejada-Herrera’s performances activated a mode of “dramatically intersubjective” [4] artistic production for the first time in Peru. Establishing a convulsive relationship with her audience, the artist made visible how identities are articulated dialectically, each forming the other, through a continuous exchange of desires and identifications.

The artist’s constant attempts to articulate her personal story in its social context and to postulate these themes as defining issues within the public-sphere intersubjective dynamic, may well have constituted her most original contribution to Peruvian contemporary art. Nevertheless, her quest to democratize her language and audience found a critical vacuum. It was precisely due to a lack of referents and interlocutors that in 2001 the artist traveled to the United States to undertake an MFA as a fellow at Virginia Commonwealth University. [5] Since the artist left Peru, relatively little has been written about her more recent work, leaving a void that only now is being filled by renewed interest in it. [6] What I seek to do here is make up for that lack of information by focusing on a very specific, not-yet-studied moment from her artistic trajectory: her earliest productions in the United States, through an analysis of three specific performances: Accents of Color (2004-2006), One Day Around the neighborhood Choreographing Me (2006) and Nouveau Bourgeois Latin American Immigrant Who learned shopping and Has Good Taste (2004-2006).

Tejada-HerreraBATACLANA-2

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Bomba y la bataclana en la danza del vientre, 1999, performance. Video directed and edited by the artist. From the archive of Elena Tejada-Herrera. Courtesy of the artist.

Tejada-Herrera-Immigrant-1

Elena Tejada-Herrera, New Bourgeois Latina Immigrant Who Learned Shopping and Has Good Taste, 2004-2005, performance/collage digital. From the archive of Elena Tejada-Herrera. Courtesy of the artist.

II

The MFA that Tejada-Herrera completed between 2001-2003 at Virginia Commonwealth University promoted study practice in painting, drawing and engraving. It was a program in which the interdisciplinary was not encouraged, so once again the artist found herself hobbled in attempts to develop projects that went beyond those disciplines. Nevertheless, the broader university context did allow her to explore other topics and visual languages. It was within this framework that she first had access to digital editing, the use of color and filters.

This period of experimental freedom came to an end when Tejada-Herrera finished her studies and decided to stay in the United States to apply for citizenship. To that end, she moved to Williamsburg, Virginia —a small city that can be seen as a living museum of the US colonial identity—and took on jobs in nearby cities that allowed her to fulfill requirements for permanent residence. Her change in status from “foreign student” to “immigrant” had immediate, important repercussions both in the way she lived and in her artistic production. Unlike in Lima —a hybrid, mixed-race city where Tejada-Herrera enjoyed of a privileged space of enunciation [7]— in Williamsburg she was subject to a minority position, doubly marginalized within the social hierarchy: that of being a woman as well as a Latin American immigrant.

Between 2003 and 2006, Tejada-Herrera had no studio in which to produce and store her work. Moreover, the milieu of which she had once formed a part at the university started to disappear, ultimately leaving her immersed in an alien social dynamic. In this precarious, solitary context, her performance practice became the only means to continue creating and, thus, a reaffirmation of her identity as an artist. Lacking means and resources, yet once again following a “guerrilla,” “do-it-yourself” logic of taking to the streets that had characterized her Lima interventions, the artist decided to live her work rather than just exhibit it.

Tejada-Herrera-Accent-Color-Mall

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Accent Color Mall, 2004-2005, performance. From the archive of Elena Tejada-Herrera. Courtesy of the artist.

When Tejada-Herrera takes stock of this period, she insists these performances also allowed her to both apprehend and integrate herself into her new context. Thus despite the original bewilderment she felt at a lack of city institutions dedicated to contemporary art, she soon realized that in many US working-class communities, “the market” is not only the place where salaries are spent, but is also a space of encounters, sociability and cultural exchange. With an irreverent take on these social dynamics, Tejada-Herrera’s performances acted as a quirky reading and interpretation-machine for her circumstances. This quasi-hermeneutic use of performance —based on a decoding of mass symbols— allowed the artist to find a place as a cultural producer, despite her condition as a minority/immigrant subject.

Accents of Color (2004-2006) encapsulates the living situation described above quite well. With the realization that in the United States, clothing is bought much more cheaply than supplies for painting, Tejada-Herrera decided to acquire clothes in highly vivid shades and would then go into the streets while imagining she was painting with her body. While the documentation of this action shows the artist as a “spot” of color in wide-open, at times abandoned spaces (highways, parks, shopping centers) in Williamsburg, it also documents her first incursions into other, more populous and cosmopolitan urban centers. In Williamsburg, the artist seems lost in herself, standing in the same locations for several hours. That said, in more populous areas, interaction with the public turns Accents of Color into a participatory piece. For Tejada-Herrera, this action implied transforming the performance into an extension of her in-studio visual practice. Yet it can also be read as an attempt at “visibility” within a social framework that tends to disappear subjects that, like her, do not embody a prototypical form of citizenship.

Vecindario-2

Elena Tejada-Herrera, One Day Around he Neighborhood Choreographing Me, 2006. Courtesy of the artist.

One Day Around he Neighborhood Choreographing Me (2006) is a multi-channel, highly colorful video filled with superimposed images and sounds that document a performance Tejada-Herrera made in her Williamsburg neighborhood in 2006. At first the voice of the artist is heard off-camera, in English with a heavy Latino accent, comparing life in Lima and the US. The artist goes door-to-door until she manages to work her way into her neighbors’ houses. The proposed exchange features a naïve tone that appeals to or reinforces fantasies of the Other, in this case an ingenuous, infantilized immigrant. The initial conversation revolves around clothes and other consumer habits. When a certain amount of trust has been built up, the artist asks her neighbors to teach her a dance. Surprisingly, the dances make evident that even in Williamsburg, citizens’ origins are quite diverse.

Finally, Nouveau Bourgeois Latin American Immigrant Who Learned Shopping and Has Good Taste (2004-2006) is an action the artist performed for a number of years in various cities in the states of Virginia and New York. The performance’s documentation begins with a four-channel projection. Elena Tejada-Herrera appears, standing and evincing an affirmative gesture at the entrance to a Williamsburg shopping center, brandishing a small sign that reads “Nouveau Bourgeois Latin American Immigrant Who Learns Shopping and Has Good Taste.” The artist is dressed in garments that call up clichéd, vintage femininity: pearls, colorful skirts or dresses and high-heeled shoes. Her apparel’s codification as stereotypically bourgeois contrasts with the evidently more popular origins of passers-by, who constitute an audience for the effects of this action. Immediately thereafter, the artist appears “in character” at different cultural institutions in the college town of Norfolk, also in Virginia, performing interventions at concerts, art galleries and cocktail bars. Finally the video takes us to New York’s Union Square. On camera and in front of passers-by, Tejada-Herrera changes outfits several times, as if experimenting with the various identities she can take on through clothing. In general, the video has an ironic tone and presents the artist as self-conscious, reclaiming bourgeois origins, spending power and good taste, all the characteristics that do not correspond to the typical image of the Latino immigrant in the US public sphere.

VECINDARIO-3

Elena Tejada-Herrera, One Day Around he Neighborhood Choreographing Me, 2006. Courtesy of the artist.

III

Elena Tejada-Herrera has never thought of herself as a “producer of objects.” On the contrary, she has sought to anchor her work to its context and to have the work dialogue with that context. Therefore —beyond formal elements that move through the performances described— what interests me is to think of how they function at once as an index and a subversion of immigrant subjects’ experiences in the United States.

In his book Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics, [8] Cuban-American academic José Esteban Muñoz maintains that affirming a sense of the self that includes political agency is an arduous task for subjects in whom more than one minority position in the social hierarchy converge. These subjects find themselves obliged to negotiate identity in dialogue with a generally adverse, or even phobic, majoritarian public sphere that makes them invisible or even punishes them for not embodying an ideal citizenship. Or, put another way, for not conforming to the logics of hetero-normativity, white supremacy and misogyny that underlie the formation of the US nation state.

Elena Tejada-Herrera’s performances return to the public eye a subjectivity that normally does not have a voice with which to produce its own interpretation of the world, and has been simultaneously subjected to a dual process of racialization and racism. With humor and an irreverent attitude, the artist generates short-circuits within processes of identification, problematizing grotesque representations of immigrants in the US public sphere.

Tejada-Herrera-BATACLANA-1

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Bomba y la bataclana en la danza del vientre, 1999, performance. Video directed and edited by the artist. From the archive of Elena Tejada-Herrera. Courtesy of the artist.

On more than one occasion, Tejada-Herrera has referred to a sense of humor as one of her most important professional tools for minimizing tensions and allowing “the Other” to be identified, or draw near to her life experiences without reacting defensively or aggressively. But humor doesn’t only exercise a communicative function in her work. As Freud stated in on humor, [9] appeals to a humorous attitude —as opposed to other intellectual activity processes— speak of a self that refuses to recognize the affronts reality affords it and insists that trauma from the outside world can not only not touch it, but is in fact a source of pleasure. Therefore, while the artist’s performances testify to a desire for integration into the new social context that takes her in, use of parody also speaks of a relationship of insubordination in light of as much. This, therefore, is a self that fights to de-identify itself from the toxic, stereotypical image of the Latino immigrant and reconstruct its identity from a more amenable or even seductive place.

José Esteban Muñoz defines de-identification as a survival strategy minority subjects employ to resist socially prescribed models of identification that generally constitute damaged stereotypes. Thanks to different versions of Tejada-Herrera’s immigrant self —whether these be poetic, subtle, infantilized or affirmative— the phobic object is reconfigured and repaired. Seen from this perspective, we can affirm that humor in the artist’s work functions as both a political and pedagogic project.

In Trump’s “America,” where celebration of the patriarchy, misogyny, xenophobia and racism are rapidly replacing the liberal common sense that developed thanks to the historic struggles for civil rights, representations that seek to activate new meanings of the self and new social connections are more urgent than ever. The political efficacy of performances of a self in opposition to definitive and grotesque categories lies in that they are capable of forming and empowering a counter-public. These representations make it possible for the spectator —often other minority subjects that have been rendered invisible— to imagine a world where it is indeed possible for their life experiences to be taken into account in all their complexity, and to resist the assaults of a new political environment based on fascism and intolerance of difference.

Tejada-Herrera-RECUERDO

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Recuerdo, 1998. Courtesy of the artist.

Notes

[1] The “Fujimontesinista dictatorship” is how the period between 1990 and 2001 has been named. During these years former president Alberto Fujimori and his advisor Vladimiro Montesinos set up a mode of governance equal parts strong-man, populist, crony-ist and just plain abuse of power.
[2] The discussion into which Tejada-Herrera intervened was one of the most eagerly anticipated at the biennial because its invited speakers included figures of international renown such as the Cuban curator and director of the Havana Biennial, Llilian Llanés; Mexican curator Raquel Tibol; Brazilian critic and curator Paulo Herkenhoff and Paraguayan curator Ticio Escobar, et al.
[3] See Amelia Jones, Body Art: Performing the Subject, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 1998.
[4] Ibid.
[5] Personal communication with the artist (April 2016).
[6] At Proyecto AMIL I recently curated Elena Tejada- Herrera, Videos de esta mujer: registros de performance 1997- 2010. The exhibition gathered twenty-one performance documentations the artist created over the course of almost a decade of artistic production in Peru and the United States.
[7] Due to a series of identity-related characteristics —i.e., being white, drawn from the educated, bourgeois classes and an artist— Tejada-Herrera occupied a privileged position in her native Lima.
[8] José Esteban Muñoz, Desidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 1999.
[9] Sigmund Freud, “El Humor” in Obras Completas de Sigmund Freud, Madrid: Amorrortu Editores, 1998.

Tejada-Herrera-IMMIGRANT-2

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Nueva burguesa inmigrante latina que aprendió a ir de compras y tiene buen gusto: subversiones en el trabajo de Elena Tejada-Herrera, 2005, performance. Fotografía por Frank George Kanelos. Del archivo de Elena Tejada-Herrera. Cortesía de la artista.

I

Salvo escasas representaciones en exhibiciones y contadas menciones en libros especializados, la obra de Elena Tejada-Herrera ha sido omitida de los relatos que en los últimos años se han construido en torno al arte contemporáneo peruano. Dicha omisión no sólo responde a que la artista vive hace más de 15 años fuera del país, sino sobre todo a su insistencia en elaborar un lenguaje plástico sincrético que desde el cuestionamiento de las relaciones de género y otras categorías identitarias le permite nada menos que interpelar la vida pública e intervenir en la recreación de las sensibilidades colectivas. Con este fin, la artista tuvo que poner en marcha un modelo alternativo para la difusión de su trabajo, basado en intervenciones de corte “guerrilla” en el espacio público urbano y virtual que puso en evidencia los puntos ciegos del circuito legitimado por la oficialidad artística limeña. Este impulso antiformalista e indisciplinado que atraviesa su trabajo la han convertido en una artista difícil de clasificar y, a pesar de su centralidad en la historia del arte contemporáneo peruano, también fácil de marginar.

Elena Tejada-Herrera inició su formación artística a mediados de los noventa en la especialidad de pintura en la facultad de Artes de la Pontificia Universidad del Perú –escuela donde se promovía el desarrollo de un lenguaje subjetivo y a-politizado. Sin embargo, la artista pronto perdería su interés por las formas puras para afirmar su vocación por lo que podríamos llamar una promiscuidad en el uso de los medios. En efecto, en términos formales, la práctica de Tejada-Herrera se ubica en la intersección entre el performance, la instalación, el video y la “práctica social”. Esta intensa hibridez de la forma no sólo está ligada a su compromiso con el feminismo y la exploración de la sexualidad y el deseo erótico femenino, sino que también constituye un posicionamiento crítico frente a la lógica fetichista del mercado del arte.

A pesar de que la contribución de Tejada-Herrera al desarrollo del arte contemporáneo peruano está siendo cada vez más reconocida, su reputación descansa casi exclusivamente sobre tres performances que realizó y documentó en la segunda mitad de los años noventa, durante la dictadura fujimontesinista [1]: Señorita de buena presencia buscando empleo (1997), en la que irrumpió en un conversatorio organizado por la 1era Bienal Iberoamericana de Lima [2], con un traje hecho de retazos de la sección de empleos de un periódico, que sólo dejaba al descubierto el área del pubis, llamando la atención sobre el autoritarismo racial y sexual imperante en el mercado laboral peruano; Recuerdo (1998), acción en la que –emulando un cadáver envuelto en una bolsa plástica negra– la artista se arrastró por el patio de la facultad de letras de la Universidad Nacional de San Marcos mientras exclamaba los nombres de los estudiantes que en 1992 fueron asesinados por un comando paramilitar en un acto de terrorismo de estado conocido como el caso “La Cantuta”; y finalmente, Bomba y la bataclana en la danza del vientre (1999), en el que Tejada-Hererera performó un remedo de baile exótico junto a un cómico ambulante y travestido. Esta pieza dejó claro su interés por friccionar la alta cultura y la cultura popular, recuperando de la calle un sentido del humor políticamente incorrecto.

Tejada-Herrera-Senorita-2

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Señorita de buena presencia buscando empleo, 1997, performance. Cámara: Adrian Arias. Edición: Elena Tejada-Herrera. Del archivo de Elena Tejada-Herrera. Cortesía de la artista.

Tejada-Herrera-Senorita-1

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Señorita de buena presencia buscando empleo, 1997, performance. Cámara: Adrian Arias. Edición: Elena Tejada-Herrera. Del archivo de Elena Tejada-Herrera. Cortesía de la artista.

Me gustaría argumentar aquí que estos tres primeros performances de Tejada-Herrera constituyeron un espacio de revelación política en un doble sentido: como ciudadana, en la medida que presentaron una corporalidad femenina que, consciente de su privilegio de clase y raza, reivindicó la deliberación pública en una sociedad donde la paridad en el debate no está al alcance de las posibilidades de todos los ciudadanos. Y por otro lado, como artista mujer, al enfrentar el canon modernista patriarcal asentado localmente, a través del cuestionamiento de las disciplinas artísticas tradicionales y de nociones como “calidad de la obra” y el “buen gusto”. En la misma línea de lo que plantea la teórica Amelia Jones [3] en relación a algunas prácticas de body art estadounidense, podríamos afirmar que los performances de Tejada-Herrera activaron por primera vez en el Perú un modo de producción artística “dramáticamente intersubjetiva” [4]. Estableciendo una relación convulsiva con su audiencia, la artista hizo visible cómo las identidades están articuladas dialécticamente las unas a las otras a través de un continuo intercambio de deseos e identificaciones.

El constante intento de la artista por articular su historia personal en su contexto social y postular estos temas como definitorios dentro de la dinámica intersubjetiva de la esfera pública constituyó quizás su aporte más original al arte contemporáneo peruano. Sin embargo, su búsqueda por democratizar su lenguaje y a su audiencia se encontró con un vacío crítico. Fue justamente por la falta de referentes e interlocutores que en el 2001 la artista viajó a los Estados Unidos para hacer una maestría con una beca de la Virginia Commonwealth University [5]. Desde su partida se ha escrito relativamente poco acerca de su trabajo más reciente, dejando un vacío que sólo ahora está siendo llenado por un renovado interés en su obra [6]. Pretendo aquí contribuir a subsanar dicha falta centrándome en un momento muy específico y aún no estudiado de su trayectoria artística. Esto es, su producción inicial en EE.UU., específicamente a través del análisis de tres performances: Acentos de color (2004-2006), Un día por el vecindario coreograféandome (2006) y Nueva burguesa inmigrante latina que aprendió a ir de compras y tiene buen gusto (2004-2006).

Tejada-HerreraBATACLANA-2

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Bomba y la bataclana en la danza del vientre, 1999, performance. Video dirigido y editado por la artista. Del archivo de Elena Tejada-Herrera. Cortesía de la artista.

Tejada-Herrera-Immigrant-1

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Nueva burguesa inmigrante latina que aprendió a ir de compras y tiene buen gusto, 2004-2005, performance/collage digital. Del archivo de Elena Tejada-Herrera. Cortesía de la artista.

II

El Master en Bellas Artes que Tejada-Herrera cursó entre los años 2001 y 2003 en la Virginia Commonwealth University promovía una práctica de estudio en las áreas de pintura, dibujo y grabado. Se trataba de un programa en el que la interdisciplinariedad no era fomentada, por lo que una vez más la artista encontró trabas para desarrollar proyectos que excedieran estas disciplinas. Sin embargo, el contexto universitario más amplio sí le permitió explorar otras problemáticas y lenguajes plásticos. Fue en este marco en el que la artista tuvo acceso por primera vez a la edición digital, al uso de filtros y al color.

Esta etapa de libertad experimental llegó a su fin cuando Tejada-Herrera culminó sus estudios y tomó la decisión de permanecer en EE.UU. para aplicar a la ciudadanía. Con ese fin se mudó a Williamsburg (Virginia) –una pequeña ciudad que puede verse como un museo vivo de la identidad colonial estadounidense– consiguiendo una serie de trabajos en ciudades aledañas que le permitirían aplicar a la residencia permanente.

El cambio de status legal de “estudiante internacional” a “inmigrante” tendría repercusiones inmediatas e importantes tanto en sus condiciones de vida como sobre su producción artística. En efecto, a diferencia de Lima –ciudad híbrida y mestiza donde Tejada-Herrera gozaba de un lugar de enunciación privilegiado [7]– en la conservadora Williamsburg se abrió ante ella una posición minoritaria y doblemente marginal en la jerarquía social: la de ser mujer e inmigrante latinoamericana.

Entre los años 2003 y 2006 Tejada-Herrera no sólo no tuvo un taller que le permitiera producir y almacenar su trabajo, sino que el milieu del cual formaba parte fue desapareciendo hasta dejarla inmersa en una dinámica social que le era ajena. En este contexto precario y solitario, la práctica del performance se convirtió en la única vía para continuar creando y, por tanto, en una reafirmación de su identidad como artista. Entonces, sin los medios ni los recursos –pero replicando la lógica “guerrilla” y “hágalo usted mismo” de tomar las calles que caracterizaron sus intervenciones en Lima– la artista decidió vivir su trabajo en lugar de mostrarlo.

Tejada-Herrera-Accent-Color-Mall

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Acentos de color, 2004-2005, performance. Archivo de Elena Tejada-Herrera. Cortesia de la artista.

Cuando Tejada-Hererra da cuenta de esta etapa insiste en que estos performances también le servían para aprehender e integrarse a su nuevo contexto. Así, a pesar del extrañamiento inicial que le causó la ausencia de instituciones dedicadas al arte contemporáneo en la ciudad, pronto se percató de que en muchas comunidades norteamericanas de clase trabajadora “el mercado” no solamente es el lugar donde se consume el salario, sino que es también un espacio de encuentro, de sociabilidad e intercambio cultural. Con una relación de irreverencia frente a estas dinámicas sociales, los performances de Tejada-Herrera funcionaron como una máquina de lectura e interpretación excéntrica de sus circunstancias. Este uso cuasi hermenéutico del performance –basado en la decodificación de los símbolos de masas– le permitió a la artista encontrar un lugar como productora cultural a pesar de su condición de sujeto minoritario/inmigrante.

Acentos de color (2004-2006) resume bastante bien la situación vital descrita líneas arriba. Al constatar que en EE.UU. comprar ropa era infinitamente más económico que comprar materiales para pintar, Tejada-Herrera decidió adquirir prendas de colores muy encendidos para luego salir a las calles imaginando que pintaba con su cuerpo. El registro de la acción muestra a la artista como un “punto” de color en espacios amplios y a veces abandonados (carreteras, parques, centros comerciales) de Williamsburg, pero también da cuenta de sus primeras incursiones en otros centros urbanos más poblados y cosmopolitas. En Williamsburg, la artista aparece ensimismada, parada en las mismas locaciones por varias horas. Sin embargo, en las áreas más pobladas, la interacción con el público convierten Acentos de color en una pieza participativa. Para Tejada-Herrera esta acción implicó transformar el performance en una extensión de su práctica pictórica en el taller. No obstante, también puede ser leída como un intento de “aparición” dentro de un entramado social que tiende a desaparecer a sujetos que, como ella, no encarnan una forma de ciudadanía prototípica.

Vecindario-2

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Un día en el vecindario coreograféandome, 2006. Cortesía de la artista.

Un día en el vecindario coreografeándome (2006) es un video multicanal, muy colorido y lleno de superposiciones de imágenes y sonidos que documenta un performance realizado por Tejada-Herrera en su vecindario en la ciudad de Williamsburg en el 2006. Al inicio se escucha su voz en off, que con un inglés de marcado acento latino, hace un contrapunto entre su vida en Lima y EE.UU. La artista toca puerta por puerta hasta lograr introducirse en las casas de sus vecinos. El intercambio propuesto tiene un tono naif que apela o refuerza las fantasías de “el Otro”, en este caso, un inmigrante ingenuo e infantilizado. La conversación inicial gira en torno a la ropa y otros hábitos de consumo. Cuando se ha establecido cierta confianza, la artista les pide a sus vecinos que le enseñen un baile. Sorprendentemente, los bailes hacen evidente cómo incluso en Williamsburg los orígenes de los ciudadanos son muy diversos.

Finalmente, Nueva burguesa inmigrante latina que aprendió a ir de compras y tiene buen gusto (2004-2006) es una acción que la artista llevó a cabo durante varios años y a través de varias ciudades del estado de Virginia y Nueva York. El registro del performance comienza con una proyección en cuatro canales. Elena Tejada-Herrera aparece parada, con gesto afirmativo, en la entrada de un centro comercial en Williamsburg sosteniendo un pequeño cartel que dice: Nouveau Bourgeois Latin American Immigrant Who Learns Shopping and Has Good Taste. La artista va vestida con prendas que evocan una feminidad cliché y vintage: collar de perlas, faldas y/o vestidos coloridos y tacones. La codificación de su ropa como estereotipadamente burguesa, contrasta con el origen evidentemente popular de los transeúntes, que para el efecto de esta acción, constituyen su audiencia. Acto seguido, la artista aparece “en personaje” en diferentes instituciones culturales de la ciudad universitaria de Norkfolk, también en Virginia: conciertos, galerías de arte y bares son visitados por la artista en “personaje”. Finalmente, el video nos traslada a Union Square en Nueva York. Frente a la cámara y los transeúntes, Tejada-Herrera se cambia varias veces de atuendos, como experimentado con las diferentes identidades que puede asumir a través de la ropa. En líneas generales, el video tiene un tono irónico, y muestra a la artista consciente de sí misma, reivindicando un origen burgués, capacidad adquisitiva y buen gusto; todas características que no corresponden a la imagen prototípica del migrante de origen latino en la esfera pública estadounidense.

VECINDARIO-3

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Un día en el vecindario coreograféandome, 2006. Cortesía de la artista.

III

Elena Tejada-Herrera nunca se ha pensado como una “productora de objetos”; por el contrario, ha buscado que su trabajo esté anclado y en diálogo con su contexto. Por ello, más allá de los elementos formales que atraviesan los performances descritos, lo que me interesa pensar es cómo funcionan al mismo tiempo como un índice y una subversión de la experiencia de los sujetos inmigrantes en Norteamérica.

En su libro Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics [8], el académico cubano-americano José Esteban Muñoz sostiene que afirmar un sentido del yo con agencia política es una tarea ardua para los sujetos en quienes confluyen más de una posición minoritaria en la jerarquía social. Dichos sujetos se ven obligados a negociar su identidad en diálogo con una esfera pública mayoritaria generalmente adversa e incluso fóbica que los invisibiliza o incluso castiga por no encarnar una ciudadanía ideal. Es decir, por no cumplir con las lógicas de la heteronormatividad, supremacía blanca y misoginia que subyacen a la formación del Estado Nación norteamericano.

Los performances de Elena Tejada-Herrera devuelven al ojo público una subjetividad que normalmente no tiene voz para producir su propia interpretación del mundo y que ha sido sometida simultáneamente a procesos de racialización y racismo. Con sentido del humor y una actitud irreverente, la artista genera corto-circuitos en los procesos de identificación, problematizando las representaciones caricaturescas de los inmigrantes en la esfera pública en EE.UU.

Tejada-Herrera-BATACLANA-1

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Bomba y la bataclana en la danza del vientre, 1999, performance. Video dirigido y editado por la artista. Del archivo de Elena Tejada-Herrera. Cortesía de la artista.

En más de una ocasión Tejada-Herrera se ha referido al sentido del humor como una de sus herramientas de trabajo más importante para minimizar tensiones y permitir que “el otro” pueda identificarse o acercarse a su experiencia de vida sin reaccionar de manera defensiva o agresiva. Pero el humor no sólo juega una función comunicativa en su obra. Como afirmaba Freud en El Humor [9], la apelación a la actitud humorística –en lugar de otros procesos de actividad intelectual– habla de un yo que se rehúsa a reconocer las afrentas que le ocasiona la realidad y que se empecina en que los traumas del mundo exterior no sólo no pueden tocarlo, sino que son una fuente de placer. Entonces, si bien los performances de la artista dan cuenta de un deseo de integración al nuevo contexto social que la acoge, el uso de la parodia habla también de una relación de insubordinación frente al mismo. Se trata, pues, de un yo que lucha por desidentificarse con la imagen tóxica estereotípica del migrante de origen latino y reconstruir su identidad desde lugares más amables o incluso seductores.

José Esteban Muñoz define la desidentificación como una estrategia de supervivencia empleada por sujetos minoritarios para resistir los modelos de identificación prescritos socialmente, que por lo general constituyen estereotipos dañados. El objeto fóbico es, gracias a las diferentes versiones del yo inmigrante de Tejada-Herrera –ya sea poéticas, sutiles, infantilizadas o afirmativas– reconfigurado y reparado. Visto desde esta perspectiva, podríamos afirmar que en el trabajo de la artista, el humor funciona como un proyecto político y pedagógico.

En la Norteamérica de Trump, donde la celebración del patriarcado, la misoginia, la xenofobia y el racismo están reemplazando rápidamente el sentido común liberal que se desarrolló gracias a las luchas históricas por los derechos civiles, son más urgentes que nunca las representaciones que buscan activar nuevos sentidos del yo y nuevos vínculos sociales. La eficacia política de los performances de un yo que se opone a categorías definitivas y caricaturescas radica en que son capaces de formar y empoderar un contra-público. En efecto, estas representaciones posibilitan al espectador –frecuentemente otros sujetos minoritarios que han sido invisibilizados– imaginar un mundo donde es posible que su experiencia de vida sea tomada en cuenta en su complejidad y resistir el embate de una nueva atmósfera política basada en el fascismo y la intolerancia a la diferencia.

Tejada-Herrera-RECUERDO

Elena Tejada-Herrera, Recuerdo, 1998. Cortesía de la artista.

Notas:

1. Dictadura fujimontesinista es la manera en como se ha denominado al periodo comprendido entre los años 1990 y 2001, en el que el ex-presidente Alberto Fujimori y su asesor Vladimiro Montesinos instalaron una forma de hacer política que combinó caudillismo, populismo, clientelismo y abuso de poder.
2. El conversatorio “intervenido” por Tejada-Herrera era uno de los más esperados de la bienal pues contaba entre sus invitados a figuras de renombre internacional como: la curadora cubana y directora de la Bienal de la Habana Llilian Llanés, la curadora mexicana Raquel Tibol, el crítico y curador brasileño Paulo Herkenhoff, el curador paraguayo Ticio Escobar, entre otros.
3. Ver más en: Amelia Jones, Body Art: Performing the Subject, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 1998
4. Ibid.
5. Comunicación personal con la artista (Abril, 2016)
6. Recientemente curé en Proyecto AMIL Elena Tejada- herrera, Videos de esta mujer: registros de performance 1997-2010. La exposición reunió 21 registros de performances creados por la artista a lo largo de casi una década de producción artística entre el Perú y los Estados Unidos.
7. Por una serie de características identitarias –a saber, ser blanca, de clase media educada y artista– en Lima Tejada- Herrera ocupaba una posición privilegiada.
8. José Esteban Muñoz, Desidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 1999.
9. Sigmund Freud, “El Humor” en Obras Completas de Sigmund Freud, Madrid: Amorrortu Editores, 1998.

Tags: , ,

Cities of Ys

Impenetrable

On Some Future

90 gramos de vida útil